Best practices for evaluating condition of used hydraulic chuck?
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  1. #1
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    Default Best practices for evaluating condition of used hydraulic chuck?

    Say I want to look at a used Kitagawa hydraulic three-jaw chuck at an auction or used machinery dealer. I've really only dealt with hydraulic chucks installed on machines under power, so not sure what should be done for a quick bench inspection.

    Considering I can't hook it up to a lathe or dismantle it, how could I evaluate it to make sure it hasn't been completely abused? Any telltale signs of messed-up master jaws?

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    BUMP...I'm really surprised no one has any insight on this!

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    Put a hex wrench in the removable jaw screw for leverage an see what kinds of sloppy movement you can detect.

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    Be very very - as in extremely careful buying used lathe chucks, ESPECIALLY power types.

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    Does it come with a no-money-back guarantee?

    I'd pretty much want to test it after mounting on the machine for which it is intended. I'd have to take responsibility for freight both in and out. But I'd certainly want a money back guarantee on it's suitable repeatability. If I only intended to chuck short pieces of stock and never had to worry about concentricity with a previously turned surface, then a bargain chuck might be fine.


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