Best way to make this part?
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    Default Best way to make this part?

    Based on my current capabilities, I'd be looking at milling it, most likely with an rotary indexer. It would take several operations and would not be ideal for any quantity. A newer machine with a 5 axis multi-head indexer would be nice but the machine cost would be astronomical. I've thought about die casting but adding the cavities seems like it would make for a more complex (expensive) mold. This would definitely require a large number of parts to justify the cost. It's part of something I'm trying to market in the near future but the market price would need to be low enough to sell. Not interested in going overseas to lower the cost if it can be avoided. This is also not the final draft of the part but close enough to give a good idea of the basic shape and features.

    What is the consensus?

    Thanks.

    Edit: the surface will be anodized with a brushed finish underneath, therefore the surface will need to be 64 Ra or better before any surface treatment.

    part.jpg

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    Material requirements?

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    Quote Originally Posted by carbonbl View Post
    Material requirements?
    6061, 2024, or 7075 Aluminum

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    Press form the two halves. Weld them together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinoyance View Post
    Press form the two halves. Weld them together.
    Didn't think of that. What are the considerations that need to be made when designing/machining the form and die?

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    How about carving up a cavity mold for wax injection, leading to a
    lost wax casting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Fleming View Post
    Didn't think of that. What are the considerations that need to be made when designing/machining the form and die?
    -Compensate for springback, make sure die surfaces are smooth and hardened to reduce scarring, fit the dies closely enough to accommodate your desired tolerances, and account for material thickness between the die and form.

    Doc.

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    If your going to weld it, you're kinda stuck with 6061. 7075 and 2024 are not really good for welding as they will tend to crack, either right away or a few months into service.
    6061 in the t6 condition does not like being bent. Anything other than t0, which only lasts till it warms up to room temp from quenching, is likely to crack unless your bend has a large radius (8-10X thickness or bigger).
    I think the 3000's and some of the 5000's are bendable and weldable, but have some other trade off's. Mostly corrosion resistance and strength/toughness.

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    Size? 3D printing in metal might be the way if not too big. Or 3D printing a wax pattern and casting.

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    What's the business case?

    What kind of margins are you looking at? Direct to consumer? Medical? Aerospace? Uncle Sugar?

    How important is overall fit/finish? Is this a cheap commodity thing that needs to be this way to elegantly bring together parts of an assembly? Or is this a Class A part where the quality and haptics will have a big impact on how people use and feel about this as a product?

    Is there market demand for this widget, or are you starting a new thing?

    Those questions are far more impactful on the process you choose here than anything else.

    What you need to do is start making them and iterating. On a 3 axis mill with a rotary and dovetail workholding, that is a 3.5 setup part: .5 puts a dovetail on one of the wide sides. 1 is in the rotary to rough off the material, do the bores/openings, rough and finish everything you have access to. 2 has the part in the dovetail facing up in Z to finish the opposite face. 3 is gently clamped in a vise to cut off the dovetail and finish that last face. If you want to get fancy, the last op could be done with a MiteeBite expanding clamp profiled to slip into and expand into the internal cavity.

    It wouldn't be efficient, but it could get you along enough to do the most important thing, which is prove out the market. Once you have any sort of traction, the world of possibilities for how to make a part open up exponentially. Right now, focus on the part and overall product using your current capabilities.

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    If you weld it, and even if you make your own 6061 rod, after anodizing you will still see the weld. An expensive lesson I learned on a appearance critical part.

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    to gkoenig's excellent points, I'd ask about tolerance. Do the three holes in the end have to comprise an interference fit, to be brazed for use in high vacuum? Or is this a scout neckerchief slide?

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    Answering your initial query, I would say 'under an assumed name.'

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    Still no mention of size, ……which could have a BIG bearing on how the part is made.

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    Perhaps change the design a bit to make it out of sheetmetal

    Peter

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    No dimensions given.
    No tolerance given.
    No material specified.
    No sections provided.
    3D rendering views do not completely show object.

    I suggest learning how to become a machinist first, and worry about making parts for other people later.

    Or is this another one of those wacky questions from an "inventor" trying to make a perpetual motion machine?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    Or is this another one of those wacky questions from an "inventor" trying to make a perpetual motion machine?
    "Athletic Supporter".....

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    OP is on Oaklahoma so I am thinking it for making Y connections in large oilfield pipe.

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    I haven't made it back here in a while, so I'll see what answers I can give.

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug
    How about carving up a cavity mold for wax injection, leading to a
    lost wax casting.
    I don't think the surface finish on the outside of the part would be suitable and would require further machining.

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine
    -Compensate for springback, make sure die surfaces are smooth and hardened to reduce scarring, fit the dies closely enough to accommodate your desired tolerances, and account for material thickness between the die and form.

    Doc.
    I'm starting to think press forming and welding isn't the best option. I'd have to remachine the entire exterior of the part due to the weld bead and possible warping.

    Quote Originally Posted by billzweig
    Size? 3D printing in metal might be the way if not too big. Or 3D printing a wax pattern and casting.
    Roughly 2" wide, 2" tall, 1" thick. Model is not proportional. Surface finish wouldn't be tolerable and would require too much machine work afterwards.

    Quote Originally Posted by gkoenig
    What's the business case?
    New product to promote on a crowd funding site

    What kind of margins are you looking at? Direct to consumer? Medical? Aerospace? Uncle Sugar?
    50% would be ideal but 30% at quantity would be okay. Direct to consumer. Not any of the cases above.

    How important is overall fit/finish? Is this a cheap commodity thing that needs to be this way to elegantly bring together parts of an assembly? Or is this a Class A part where the quality and haptics will have a big impact on how people use and feel about this as a product?
    Very high quality fit and finish. Not a cheap commodity thing but trying to tap a new market. I said previously it's part of an assembly but in actuality that is the final part. Quality and Haptics are essential.

    Is there market demand for this widget, or are you starting a new thing?
    New thing, but people may feel they need it

    Those questions are far more impactful on the process you choose here than anything else.

    What you need to do is start making them and iterating. On a 3 axis mill with a rotary and dovetail workholding, that is a 3.5 setup part: .5 puts a dovetail on one of the wide sides. 1 is in the rotary to rough off the material, do the bores/openings, rough and finish everything you have access to. 2 has the part in the dovetail facing up in Z to finish the opposite face. 3 is gently clamped in a vise to cut off the dovetail and finish that last face. If you want to get fancy, the last op could be done with a MiteeBite expanding clamp profiled to slip into and expand into the internal cavity.

    It wouldn't be efficient, but it could get you along enough to do the most important thing, which is prove out the market. Once you have any sort of traction, the world of possibilities for how to make a part open up exponentially. Right now, focus on the part and overall product using your current capabilities.

    Making the marketing prototypes won't be an issue but mass production is the key. Based on my desire to take it to a crowd funding site, I need to know what kind of prices to expect for production to know how to price it en masse.
    Answered your questions within the quote.

    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr
    to gkoenig's excellent points, I'd ask about tolerance. Do the three holes in the end have to comprise an interference fit, to be brazed for use in high vacuum? Or is this a scout neckerchief slide?
    Tolerance is loose +/- .015. Closer to your latter guess than the former.


    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami
    Still no mention of size, ……which could have a BIG bearing on how the part is made.
    Roughly 2" W x 2" H x 1" D. Size may change based on different designs but will stay semi-close to these numbers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland
    Perhaps change the design a bit to make it out of sheetmetal

    Peter
    Thought about that also but couldn't really come up with a good way to make everything work properly. Still might consider it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F.
    OP is on Oaklahoma so I am thinking it for making Y connections in large oilfield pipe.
    Not quite.


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