Bewildering Choice of Carbide Tip Lathe Tools
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Bewildering Choice of Carbide Tip Lathe Tools

    I’m relatively new to using replaceable carbide tip tooling on a lathe. A tool catalogue I have has 14 pages of tool holders and 34 pages of carbide inserts. The inserts are round, square, triangular, diamond shaped. Needless to say the choices are overwhelming to a hobbyist trying break into this tooling. Can anyone provide some general guidance on applications or direct me to a source that helps sort the field out.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    5,124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4812
    Likes (Received)
    957

    Default

    CNMG432….DNMG432…VNMG432. GOOD BASIC INSERTS for most all applications. Buy a couple of grades which allow the greatest range of materials used. You can order inserts specific to the types of metals you work. Buy boxes never get too few.
    You must have inserts to cut and will always need them they break and wear out.

    This is a adequate starting point for general lathe work. They are OD turning inserts. There are many inserts with different chip breakers and various grades of carbide. These basic destinations will have types which vary depending on the material to be turned.

    ID tooling can be the same yet using boring bars. You want the chips to break rather than string up. Be careful if you do not know how to run a lathe as they will injure and kill. Wear safety glasses of good quality do not risk your eyes. Do not use long sleeves as they catch and will pull you into the machine.

    Long hair tie it back out of the way or cut it all off.

  3. Likes boosted liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    40
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    12

    Default

    This could be the guide you seek:

    Introduction to Indexable Tooling for the Metal Lathe: A User Guide Introduction to Indexable Tooling for the Metal Lathe: A User Guide: Best, David P.: 9798713564643: Amazon.com: Books

    No relation. I haven’t read it. A lot of the hobby guys seem to love it.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    the Netherlands
    Posts
    246
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    46

    Default

    As a hobbyist as well I get by with hss mostly. To try and and find out what worked best for a relatively small lathe I got a set of 8 or 10 ccmt holders(left and right, boring bar, facing etc.) These are sold at stores that cater to hobbyists and model engineers. Usually supplied with a general purpose insert. I am sure that they will not hold up if compared to professional quality tooling, but for a hobby they work well enough and do not break the bank. I added inserts for aluminium later.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Apex, NC
    Posts
    1,786
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    901

    Default

    On the manual lathe, the most common turning carbide insert tool I use is a Kennematal NKLCL-0805V (left) & NKLCR-0805V (right) with uncoated NPL 51 K68 inserts (trapezoidal with two cutting edges). These are *uncoated*, almost polished and very sharp, and can be had in different tip radii. They're all-purpose "profiling" inserts, so can turn up to a face, face, profile etc, and do anything from delicate work to pretty good hogging. There are also boring bars that accept that insert (not for small diameters). Holders and inserts can be found on ebay at reasonable prices. They work well on everything from stainless to aluminum. Otherwise I don't use a lot of carbide, just some small boring bars, custom ground brazed tools, threading occasionally, etc. On low-power manual machines, sharp, uncoated polished inserts tend to work best. Learn how to grind and hone HSS cutters, they're also useful and a necessity on a manual lathe.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    51
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    This chart is helpful when you need to decode and insert or understand its geometry.

    www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-insert-d.htm

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    8,932
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1770

    Default

    Be careful. I bought some cheap inserts and holders from China on the bay and later realized they are for 55 degree threads not 60 degree.
    Price inserts before buying the holder
    Bill D

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    9,729
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4680

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4thTool View Post
    The inserts are round, square, triangular, diamond shaped. Needless to say the choices are overwhelming ...
    Triangles probably make the most sense for you.

    There, that cuts it down a little

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    8,932
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1770

    Default

    In theory a round insert has a infinite number of cutting edges for general rounding work. Wear out the cutting edge and rotate a fraction of a degree and voila! a new fresh edge is presented to the work.
    Bill D

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    9,729
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4680

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    In theory a round insert has a infinite number of cutting edges for general rounding work.
    They also chatter like a mofo unless you have a lot of mass and hp and push them, and they won't go into corners.

    For this person, I'll stick with recommending triangles ...

  12. Likes Terry Keeley, TeachMePlease liked this post
  13. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Davidson NC USA
    Posts
    1,551
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    652
    Likes (Received)
    963

    Default

    You don't state what size lathe you are using. After years of using carbide on large lathes, I have found that HSS in a tangential holder works best for my South Bend 9, and Rockwell 11. Not to mention cheaper.

  14. Likes Steven-Canada liked this post
  15. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    My lathe is a Hardinge HLV. At present my operations are turning and boring mostly of aluminum, carbon steel, and occasionally SSTL. I’m using HSS tools to perfect my external threading skills. I perform roughing but would like to learn/tool for smooth finishes as well. As a hobbyist, of course I have a limited budget.

  16. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
    Posts
    9,825
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16888
    Likes (Received)
    12045

    Default

    You know how I deal with the insane plethora of inserts as a professional..

    I pick up the phone..

    "Hey Curtis.. Send me something that does XYZ".. It shows up on my doorstep and it works, and I don't get raked over the coals.

    Curtis even has some cool little kits for the home shop guys.. And its the same stuff I use that WORKS.

    HOBBY LATHE KIT

    Trying to figure it out by yourself, is JUST NOT WORTH IT..

    Every time you buy a tool, or an insert, a portion of that money is for TECH SUPPORT.. USE IT!!!!!
    You are paying for it.. USE IT..

    You'll pull your hair trying to figure it all out, its just ridiculous. I tried when I was new in this game.
    I failed spectacularly.. There is just TOO MUCH!!! Let the people that KNOW this stuff pick your inserts.. Its really that easy, and weather You pick it, or They pick it.. You're paying for them anyways, might as well use their expertise.

  17. Likes richard newman, Cole2534 liked this post
  18. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Bobw, good point! Does anyone see anything wrong with import tooling for the hobbyists? If I choose it, what will I be disappointed with?

  19. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    5,729
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1128
    Likes (Received)
    2520

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobw View Post
    You know how I deal with the insane plethora of inserts as a professional..

    I pick up the phone..

    "Hey Curtis.. Send me something that does XYZ".. It shows up on my doorstep and it works, and I don't get raked over the coals.

    Curtis even has some cool little kits for the home shop guys.. And its the same stuff I use that WORKS.

    HOBBY LATHE KIT

    Trying to figure it out by yourself, is JUST NOT WORTH IT..
    Yup. And he remembers I like boats, so we talk about those too.



    Programmed via Mazatrol

  20. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,152
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    195

    Default

    On my Monarch ee which generally comes under the "light lathe" catagory I went to Carbide Depot and bought the high positive 332 (3/8 inscribed circle size ie SMALL) WNMG brand name inserts.

    They will fit both left and right handed boring bars and R/L turning tools. This should cover 90% of your carbide needs with one insert.

    The high positive WNMG has 6 cutting edges making it a screaming deal, providing you don't break the insert and crack the seat. Stick with one maker on the holders so they share common seats (shims), pins, clamps and screws. And have at least one back up's on those too.

    As a home gamer, learn to properly grind efficient HSS tooling. Understanding tool geometry should be a basic skillset. Check out some of the older texts from the era when HSS was king. The Henry Ford manual from WWII is a good start: it unlike the Southbend "how to run a lathe" text was intended for first year apprentices rather than "that guy" with a lathe and drill press in his garage.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •