Books on those obscure tricks of the trade; Looking for recommendations - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    So information in old books is irrelevant? It's no longer correct or useful?
    imho to a certain degree yes. a lot of important info is lacking, e.g. nomenclature of inserts. a lot is irrelevant, e.g. because we use a dro for many tasks. either you want to improve you work or indulge in historical contemplations (i like history).

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    imho to a certain degree yes. a lot of important info is lacking, e.g. nomenclature of inserts. a lot is irrelevant, e.g. because we use a dro for many tasks. either you want to improve you work or indulge in historical contemplations (i like history).
    From a historical perspective, reading the oldies is good. From a practical perspective....you may find some useful nuggets. I have a copy of Carboloy's Cemented Carbide Tool Manual, issue date February 7, 1949. Youll notice it is sitting next to my Mastercam mouse pad and fancy gaming mouse. The contrast between the two is striking lol.

    This manual specifically has A LOT of useful information in it, specifically how and why to grind lathe tools to achieve certain tasks. This is extremely valuable! I am glad to have picked this up because we do grind alot of custom tools in our shop. We do have the latest and greatest technology and we also have a pair of 1967 Hardinge HLV lathes, a 1953 Bridgeport and a 1973 Summit engine lathe. Reading those manuals is very informative.

    Now back to reality in the 21st century...I would say most of the time I am doing CNC work. We have a bunch of fun attachments for the mills - rotary tables, sine plates, etc etc. Very useful to have those tools lying around because inevitably you'll need em. But again, I don't need to use a rotary plate to cut a circle on a mill. Ill just program it.

    For that reason I listed Smid's books because they are more relevant than an obscure carbide tooling manual. Both are important, I would say Smid is more important though.

    Another top book for general reading is "Machining Fundamentals" by John Walker and Bob Dixon. I believe it is basically a text book for trades schools/machining programs at community colleges. Great info on machining as a whole, different processes, and modern applications.

    carbide-2-.jpgcarbide-2.jpg

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    There is still a lot of useful info in the old books that still apply to machinists. Sharpening and grinding tooling. Proper filing techniques. Determining the height for workbenches and vices. Layout of work. Just because we use a DRO, doesn't mean that we should not no the basics of how the machine works, or how to set up an indicator for when the DRO or its scale breaks in the middle of a job.

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    beside books its always a good idea to watch good vids, like joe pieczynski's.
    Last edited by dian; 06-11-2021 at 04:39 AM.

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    I have books and have read more thanks to the public library. But frankly, to learn the tricks is precisely why I am a member of this board and others. I have learned more here than I ever could have from 100 books and that IS the truth.



    Quote Originally Posted by dandrummerman21 View Post
    I've been at my current employer for 14 years (I'm 32), along with 2 years of machine shop in highschool. In that time, I've learned a whole lot of tricks from a few guys, that aren't super obvious but work a treat.


    I had a supervisor, who is now retired, and I'm currently in his role (I was promoted to his position a few years before he retired). I run the CNC mill department. I used to have a lot of questions, and he was usually very patient, and would answer them very well, and then some. Things like stoning the inside edge of a reamer if a chip welded to it, or even scraping the inside of the flute with a piece of carbide. When to slow down the RPM, or increase feed. He showed me how to regrind endmills and grind form tools. The flipping 4 times method for facing coldrolled stock while maintaining flatness. Many other things too.



    So now I'm in his shoes, and I've got a guy with a decent amount of potential. I like to pull him aside when I set something up to teach him stuff. But my problem comes when I give him a job and he comes to me with a question that I think he should either know, or the question wasn't thought out well enough, or he didn't pay enough attention to the setup sheet or print. Sometimes I become a bit of an asshole. I realize it later. But I don't know how to stop it.


    However, I'd like to give to him (or borrow to him, if it is expensive) a book that covers some of this stuff. I imagine it has to be out there. I know there's practical machinist, and I've told him he should join and browse. But I don't think he does. However, if he had a book by the shitter, maybe he'd come back a bit enlightened in some areas.

    I don't expect any book to have everything, but I'd like it to be close. lol.


    So I googled, found this link here on PM: 15 Timeless Books Every Machinist Should Have [Updated 2020] : Practical Machinist but wasn't sure if they were any good or if there was something else I should be looking at. Some of those are a bit pricier than I would like, as well.

    Any suggestions?

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    When I got into machining and purchased some old American iron, circa 2005, I got and read a good number of books on machining. The antique books were very interesting because I always wondered how our grandfathers could have achieved the precision that they did with those floppy old lathes et cet, specifically how did we get from two rocks and a stick to ten thousandths of an inch. Moore's book on precision was quite illuminating there.

    The more recent books also had chapters on safety. The exhortations to be careful were annoying, as they didn't answer the question, be careful of what? The most useful chapters contained many examples of what can go wrong and how to avoid injury. These are invaluable.

    And I use an old method from time to time. They are too slow for production use these days, but they do work and will get one out of a corner.

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    So I gave him the copy of Machine Shop Know-how by Marlow yesterday. Seemed like an alright book, I saw some tidbits I hadn't yet figured out/learned, so that was nice.

    Today on my desk is Machine Shop Trade Secrets by Harvey. This one, I'm gonna probably hold onto for a few more days, because I think this book has way more things in it that I haven't seen, and I have already learned a few tricks myself. But I'll give it to him eventually.

    The old kinks book hasn't shown up yet.


    I also bought him "The Ultimate GD+T Pocket Guide" by Krulikowski for him. It was 20$ on amazon. Seems like a pretty good reference, although we had a tricky composite callout on a print in tne last 2 weeks which wasn't covered in this pocket guide. At least the y14.5 standard had a great example of it in there.


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