Boring/Facing or dedicated fly cutter?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default Boring/Facing or dedicated fly cutter?

    Is a boring/facing setup like that produced by Gamet/Enco capable of providing a perfectly clean surface finish so much that something dedicated to fly cutting like those produced by suburban tool would be an unnecessary addition?

    I don't intend to do much fly cutting, but it would be nice to have the additional capability. I also don't do much boring but would like to add the capability. Would be nice to use one tool for both and actually see some routine use out of it combining the two features, but I'm curious if this is advisable or if a boring/facing tool makes a lousy fly cutter.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    5,011
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4556
    Likes (Received)
    3018

    Default

    If you don't care about holding bore tolerances,sure go ahead and use your boring head as a fly cutter.
    There's a reason they are 2 different tools.

  3. Likes tdmidget, Mike C. liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Stillwater, Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    755

    Default

    Hey, there's a whole new technique I'd never considered. So I've got this 6" x 8" cast iron plate I need to surface. Ditch that cranking all the X and Y handles and making multiple passes. Now I'm looking for an automatic facing head, heavy duty so I can take a decent cut, and I'll start in the middle and let it face the whole thing on automatic.

    Of course I'm being facetious and teasing the OP a little about knowledge and experience though we all started in the same place knowing nothing about anything. Mtndew is pointing the right way. Multi-tooth cutters are great for efficient material removal. Fly cutters are slower but offer a wider sweep and usually a good surface finish. (Cutter geometry important here) Boring heads are great for straight holes and can produce very accurate sizes depending on features, tool condition, and operator experience. There are a few instances where a smooth square face to a hole is important and the facing feature comes into play.

    Choose from an array of tools to suit the job at hand though I expect every machinist with years behind him will have stories about accomplishing a task without the right tool through ingenuity, courage and holding his mouth right.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    Hey, there's a whole new technique I'd never considered. So I've got this 6" x 8" cast iron plate I need to surface. Ditch that cranking all the X and Y handles and making multiple passes. Now I'm looking for an automatic facing head, heavy duty so I can take a decent cut, and I'll start in the middle and let it face the whole thing on automatic.

    Of course I'm being facetious and teasing the OP a little about knowledge and experience though we all started in the same place knowing nothing about anything. Mtndew is pointing the right way. Multi-tooth cutters are great for efficient material removal. Fly cutters are slower but offer a wider sweep and usually a good surface finish. (Cutter geometry important here) Boring heads are great for straight holes and can produce very accurate sizes depending on features, tool condition, and operator experience. There are a few instances where a smooth square face to a hole is important and the facing feature comes into play.

    Choose from an array of tools to suit the job at hand though I expect every machinist with years behind him will have stories about accomplishing a task without the right tool through ingenuity, courage and holding his mouth right.
    Thank you for clearing up my confusion. I assumed facing was the same as face milling, but that makes much more sense that one would face a bored hole after making it.

    As mentioned, I did not do much boring since there is little call for it in the parts that I make. So forgive my ignorance please.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    10,235
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2657

    Default

    usually boring head is just a more easily fine adjustable flycutter. most but not all boring heads take inserts which normally are made for boring or facing often they dont have cutting edges for both
    .
    finish is usually ok with care but if spindle out of tram you will get a concave or not flat surface with larger diameters
    .
    usually not a good ideal to do roughing with a flycutter slow rpm and trying to take alot the cutting forces or wack wack wack can be severe enough to do machine damage and move parts in vise or fixture

  7. Likes Mike C. liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,934
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    145
    Likes (Received)
    1327

    Default

    IMO, once you use a face mill with the right inserts and the mill trammed correctly, you'll never consider anything else. Boring heads are for boring.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    usually boring head is just a more easily fine adjustable flycutter. most but not all boring heads take inserts which normally are made for boring or facing often they dont have cutting edges for both
    .
    finish is usually ok with care but if spindle out of tram you will get a concave or not flat surface with larger diameters
    .
    usually not a good ideal to do roughing with a flycutter slow rpm and trying to take alot the cutting forces or wack wack wack can be severe enough to do machine damage and move parts in vise or fixture
    Thank you, appreciate the reply. I intend to use it only for light cuts. I dislike the appearance of multiple passes on a finished surface so often enough I'll take a finished part and have it ground or hand lap it. Only issue is that not every part really calls for that level of work.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    IMO, once you use a face mill with the right inserts and the mill trammed correctly, you'll never consider anything else. Boring heads are for boring.
    I have plenty of them, I just only have them up to a 3.5" diameter.

    I tram the mill and tip the spindle about .0005" over a few inches (typical sweep), enough that the cutter doesn't cut on the back side but not so much that I'm making a big hollow.

    I've done plenty of face milling, but just nothing with a fly cutter. Frankly, I've always bit a tad nervous about fly cutters and I do appreciate that they're hard on the bearings. I've decided to pursue this because I would like to be able to finish surfaces with a higher quality result without resorting to grinding/etc.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    13,230
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6617
    Likes (Received)
    2562

    Default

    As said above, a boring facing head is a high precision piece of equpiment. It's intended to be used to bore a hole and then face off the top and/or bottom of the hole nice and flat. I use a big Chandler often in a #3 Cincinnati vertical for putting bushings in parts that are hard to hold in the lathe. You can bore out the damaged fit and face off the bottom square. Make your bushing in the lathe and leave it about .050 small on the bore. Loctite the bushing in, bore to size and then face off the length flush. Then engage the auto face with the mill head feeding upwards to chamfer the corner.

    Using one for a flycutter, even on light work would be the equivalent of using your dial indicator as a hammer.

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Californeeeah
    Posts
    1,506
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    50
    Likes (Received)
    321

    Default

    You don't have to pay the high price for a flycutter from Suburban Tool to havve a decent flycutter. That's a Cadillac. They're very easy to make, but you can buy them almost as cheap as you can make them.

  13. Likes Mike C. liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •