Brown & Sharpe Horizontal Mill No. 000 Plain - has anyone used one?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maine
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Brown & Sharpe Horizontal Mill No. 000 Plain - has anyone used one?

    I saw an old Brown & Sharpe Horizontal Mill "No. 000 Plain" for sale within driving distance of my home.

    Has anyone ever seen one of these? I find almost nothing in online searches.

    I was thinking to pick up this small machine for doing keyways in crankshafts for powersports crank-alignment applications.

    Looking for anyone who may have encountered this specific machine model who may know about things to look for before buying.

    00f0f_edc2lwxvxgw_600x450.jpg
    00q0q_htbpty60caa_600x450.jpg

  2. Likes adh2000 liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    3,520
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    610
    Likes (Received)
    1536

    Default

    Looks like it'd make a hell of a tube notcher, if nothing else.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    23,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    7313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HiltzMachining View Post
    I saw an old Brown & Sharpe Horizontal Mill "No. 000 Plain" for sale within driving distance of my home.

    Has anyone ever seen one of these? I find almost nothing in online searches.

    I was thinking to pick up this small machine for doing keyways in crankshafts for powersports crank-alignment applications.

    Looking for anyone who may have encountered this specific machine model who may know about things to look for before buying.

    00f0f_edc2lwxvxgw_600x450.jpg
    00q0q_htbpty60caa_600x450.jpg
    There are some serious limitations vs a conventional knee mill, but the sliding head WITH overarm design, table at constant height above Earth, should make it right handy for your application - and lots of others. It only has to elevate a mostly known-in-advance mass, not deal with the variable mass of whatever is on the table.

    "Look for"... what? There isn't anything complicated even "there", let alone hidden, as could present much of a barrier to putting it in good working order right inexpensively.

    I'd be tempted to Just F(irmly) grab it unless the asking price is silly-high.

  5. Likes adh2000 liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    83
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    59
    Likes (Received)
    62

    Default

    Ditto to what Thermite said! I fondled one of these in a used equipment store back in '87? wanted it real bad but could only afford one and I only had room for one, bought a quaint little M-head instead. If it was within an afternoon's drive for me I'd get it and cure that itch.
    Greg

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    23,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    7313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shutinlead View Post
    Ditto to what Thermite said! I fondled one of these in a used equipment store back in '87? wanted it real bad but could only afford one and I only had room for one, bought a quaint little M-head instead. If it was within an afternoon's drive for me I'd get it and cure that itch.
    Greg
    LOL! if ye'd ha' bought THIS one instead of the kiddiegarter-gumband-powered M-head, you wudda KNOWN you still needed a mill, kept looking, sooner ended up better-off than having an M-head to frustrate and delay fulfillment of THAT need!



    I already have "two and 3/4 mills". I count the Quartet combo two, the Burke #4 as half a mill, the repurposed Pantoengraver as a 1/4 of a mill!

    This puppy would replace the Burke #4, given the Quartet is "here". The H.B. Preise is "good with curves", of course.


    As an "only" mill, OTOH, not such a good idea.

    Readily controllable "axes" thing. Or lack-thereof, actually.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    1,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    685
    Likes (Received)
    566

    Default

    Looks like a Production mill. Probably has limited cross travel (if any). Would be great for doing one job thousands of times.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    23,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    7313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    Looks like a Production mill. Probably has limited cross travel (if any). Would be great for doing one job thousands of times.
    I don't see "any" cross-travel. That isn't actually a show stopper for the type of tasking a horizontal is usually fed.

    Think adding the metalworking equivalant of an adjustable "fence" on a tablesaw or positionable Vee blocks or similar clamping on a PHS or bandsaw, and you might have all you need for "production" of keyways even where the goods to BE keyed vary significantly, one to the next.

    As an all-too-common need for milling in general, that could EASILY justify the small footprint and power budget as is all this little puppy asks for.

    Mind. "Not as your ONLY mill". Unless that IS all you need. Some folk, it actually IS.

    Per its PO, my Burke, which IS a "general purpose" horizontal, even to OEM vise and universal table, had gone 30+ years asked to do nought BUT keyways, lawn care & groundskeeping equipment repairs, mostly.

    As with a bespoke "key" not "keyway" cutter machine, this machine wudda made that easier.

    Less messing with setups for that frees the General Purpose mill for the more challenging work.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    17

    Default

    In the 1953 brochure it lists 'maximum length of cutting feed is 5 1/2 inches. Transverse adjustment of spindle is 2 inches. Vertical adjustment of spindle head is 5 1/2 inches.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    23,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    7313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffm8622 View Post
    In the 1953 brochure it lists 'maximum length of cutting feed is 5 1/2 inches. Transverse adjustment of spindle is 2 inches. Vertical adjustment of spindle head is 5 1/2 inches.
    That can still do a useful lot.

    Ex; Nearly all our milling was done on 4 hor-bores. A K&T horizontal and the Toolmaster vertical next to it were pretty much LEFT set up, 3 shifts, month after month to do the common keyways we had on mining and rail rebuild. A rounded-end 3/4" keyslot on a tapered motor shaft end was about all we asked of the Toolmaster. The K&T horizontal did the longer, open-ended, and/or sliding keyslots.

    A fair range of sizes is addressable even with the SMALL size and work-envelope of this critter. If one has the need at all often, of course. ELSE NOT - it may as well be a decorator.

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    That can still do a useful lot.

    Ex; Nearly all our milling was done on 4 hor-bores. A K&T horizontal and the Toolmaster vertical next to it were pretty much LEFT set up, 3 shifts, month after month to do the common keyways we had on mining and rail rebuild. A rounded-end 3/4" keyslot on a tapered motor shaft end was about all we asked of the Toolmaster. The K&T horizontal did the longer, open-ended, and/or sliding keyslots.

    A fair range of sizes is addressable even with the SMALL size and work-envelope of this critter. If one has the need at all often, of course. ELSE NOT - it may as well be a decorator.
    Was the K&T new at that time? I'll bet it was nice to work on. Jeff

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    23,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    7313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffm8622 View Post
    Was the K&T new at that time? I'll bet it was nice to work on. Jeff
    For the 1960's? Not too damned old. Prolly a 1920's or 1930's vintage. It had at least left the factory with one of those new-fangled electric motors.

    The smaller one I'd been using in prior years, different Day Job was a lineshaft conversion, bought used prior to 1929, may have predated War One as its junior sibling, a B&S "0" did.

    Horizontals are ALWAYS "nice to work on". They don't have a whole zoo of leftover parts hung all over 'em, all loosey-goosey, agnostic as to where TF to point one sorta random-like moment to the next, so they don't f**k yah around. They just mill stuff.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    850
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    222

    Default

    Looks like a production mill to me too......about 1" travel of spindle side to side to set cutters.........usually only one speed with a few sets of change gears for speed changes.Round here small ones interest hobbyists ,until they discover how little use they actually are,and Ive seen the bigger ones repurposed as brake disc lathes.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    23,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    7313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Looks like a production mill to me too......about 1" travel of spindle side to side to set cutters.........usually only one speed with a few sets of change gears for speed changes.Round here small ones interest hobbyists ,until they discover how little use they actually are,and Ive seen the bigger ones repurposed as brake disc lathes.
    Oz and necessity the Mother of invention, would see just about ANYTHING "re-purposed" to meet an unrelated need, given the distances, etc.

    Here, a larger-sized B&S "O" universal table is slated as an "accessory" for my larger drillpress.

    Not for milling. Got a decent mill for that.

    For easier and better positioning between holes and such. Sort of a "half-vast" jig-bore - to Kaintucky windage precision.


  16. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia (Hobart)
    Posts
    3,360
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    454
    Likes (Received)
    2348

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Oz and necessity the Mother of invention, would see just about ANYTHING "re-purposed" to meet an unrelated need, given the distances, etc.

    Here, a larger-sized B&S "O" universal table is slated as an "accessory" for my larger drillpress.

    Not for milling. Got a decent mill for that.

    For easier and better positioning between holes and such. Sort of a "half-vast" jig-bore - to Kaintucky windage precision.

    I have a brand spanking new (old stock) all angle Deckel FP1 table as an accessory for my Kearns horizontal mill. Makes some of the local Deckel tragics cry in their beer but it works for me and it's not for sale.

    Great for setting up angled cuts.

    PDW


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2