Building a Case for Measuring Tools Without Damaging Them - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    termite, the world would be better off, if you just got off your ass and do something, make something!
    the long winded non sense post, does not build boxes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean View Post
    Would you happen to have/know of a picture of fitted blocks/pegs where this could work for the lid storage?



    Kind of like my wooden chisel box, I plan to keep it flat on a bench until I need to take it somewhere, then it will fit within a sleeve like a book on its side inside the pouch of a bag. That's why I'm concerned that the tools resting on the side in their box might get damaged, like bending a square blade.
    Much like the picture in your original post. It's less of making a "hole" for the tool and more of just blocking it in place just enough that it doesn't move in any way, but is also easy to see how it drops in.

    This is a thread I started about this topic awhile back:

    Tips for Organizing Machinists Chests

    crzypete in post #12 has the concept down IMO. The Micrometers are held in place with fitted "D" shaped pegs in the middle, but nothing around the outside so that the thimble can be at any position and it's easy to grab. It's a balance because the more fitted the retainment is, the better it holds the tool, but the harder it is to grab and the more "custom" it becomes, less likely to fit with future tools.

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  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    Much like the picture in your original post. It's less of making a "hole" for the tool and more of just blocking it in place just enough that it doesn't move in any way, but is also easy to see how it drops in.

    This is a thread I started about this topic awhile back:

    Tips for Organizing Machinists Chests

    crzypete in post #12 has the concept down IMO. The Micrometers are held in place with fitted "D" shaped pegs in the middle, but nothing around the outside so that the thimble can be at any position and it's easy to grab. It's a balance because the more fitted the retainment is, the better it holds the tool, but the harder it is to grab and the more "custom" it becomes, less likely to fit with future tools.
    Ah, okay, I do understand that! Should I use a toggle in the lid for lid storage? Thanks again for your thoughts and help with this.

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    Don't rule out Bondo.

    Small blobs placed down on box bottom, with the tool in saranwrap.
    Push it down into the blob, to make some intricate "keyway shape".

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Don't rule out Bondo.

    Small blobs placed down on box bottom, with the tool in saranwrap.
    Push it down into the blob, to make some intricate "keyway shape".
    That is an interesting idea!
    Some heavy tools that come in boxes like the Starrett 199 level, rattle around in the box, to a point the level will break the box, especially if shipped without further packing. I could see a lump of putty under some felt covered wood at the ends could be a good way of getting a tight fit at the bottom.
    I bough a used level, it ate the box up pretty bad when it was shipped, the level showed no damage itself, but the box took a couple of hours to glue back together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    That is an interesting idea!
    Depending on the replacement cost of the tool, the OP might want to use qty (2) layers of saranwrap....

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Depending on the replacement cost of the tool, the OP might want to use qty (2) layers of saranwrap....
    Across the oxygen stealing nostrils of the wuckfit that pried a tin of PAINT open with a precision square, you mean?

    I dunno if that would class as a "crime of passion" or just a "public service"?

    I might be tempted to simply lend him a more appropriate tool?

    With his first lesson in what happens when not used safely.
    Even if the slowest learner on-planet, he wouldn't need a second lesson.

    You'd have to know dead blow hammers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    termite, the world would be better off, if you just got off your ass and do something, make something!
    the long winded non sense post, does not build boxes.
    Division of labour, thing.

    Your job is boxes. Or rust removal.

    MY job is to "slow-cook" fine foods. And enjoy them. Greatly.

    That's all you need to know for now.
    Last edited by thermite; 04-08-2021 at 04:37 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean View Post
    Ah, okay, I do understand that! Should I use a toggle in the lid for lid storage? Thanks again for your thoughts and help with this.
    I'd use toggles for each tool. You can also use the lid to keep the tools in place, but as I noted before that means they need to stay in place via gravity when you open and close the case and depending how well the tools fit into their places, a tool could shift when opening or closing and mess things up.

    Lots of different ways to do it. The best way is all dependent on how well the tools fit with your design. Might take a few trial runs before the final version comes together.

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    "VPI/first-cousin paper" Under the felt, an excellent idea actually, one of the best offered here.

    I read once of moth balls dropped in the bottom drawer of a tool chest for rust prevention, not such a bad smell and much less odious upon opening than large areas of rust. I bought camphor packs and have had no complaints.
    I do wonder why everyone is stuck on wood, since some plastics are far stronger, and though my personal choice is seldom either plastic or wood I've made small tool boxes out of acetal that neither rust tools nor beat them up. They do warp but that factor would have a tug of war with wood IMO.
    In any case the enclosure must be worth much less ($$ or labor) than what it protects to make sense to me, but also if it doesn't prevent 95% of rusting it's a waste.
    One friend of mine has a huge number of steel roll away tool boxes, I can see that as the tool storage answer with camphor, and for even better protection a golden rod in the bottom of each, but then that also means a cord also to each box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    I do wonder why everyone is stuck on wood, since some plastics are far stronger
    I hate plastic, it screams CHEAP, I don't care how strong it is today, give it a few years in a shop and it will get brittle and break. I feel sorry for those of you still battling rust, was working on the boomlift yesterday and found a razor blade I left in engine compartment 5 years ago, barely a speck of rust on it.

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    I forgot to mention finish, I give the insides of wood boxes a few coats of poly, even if I use an oil finish on the outside.
    The highest dollar shotgun cases are often made of white oak, and covered in leather.
    Another option is to add metal plate in places, like Gerstner drawer bottoms, it increases the space considerably, and keeps out the termites.

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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    "VPI/first-cousin paper" Under the felt, an excellent idea actually, one of the best offered here.
    Not as if I "invented" it.

    When I was younger and not yet grown as stoopid, I used to salvage bits of it. Then learnt it lost its kick. Frustrating, that!

    Only late in life, when I had grown my stupidity to a more mature LEVEL, off the back of laziness.. did it cross my mind that the folks sending goods to me already wapped in bits of VCI/VPI didn't actually s**t the stuff as part of the goods.

    They had to BUY it.

    Lo and be HELL'ed it's just one more freakin' commodity.
    And you do NOT need a Blaster's permit to JF buy some.

    So I did.

    Roll stock. Pre-cuts.

    There are MANY vendors. Online, even.

    And I double bag my stash in big Zip-locks. So it doesn't loose it chemistry so fast.

    Out of necessity rather than any sort of brilliance, I always DID use open weave elastomers or textile pads in the tool drawers. No glue, gravity is good enough,

    Ones that I could easily cut, easily REMOVE, shoot with a preservative, clean fast.. outright replace. Divert for another tasking.

    So the vapour walks right up though the porous material, hangs around at low-level, does the job without being seen, in the way, ripped to shreds.. "etc."

    And its is "sort of" trapped. In the closed drawers. Not"sealed" but not much of a wind, either. The less-often opened and used? The longer it hangs around. Sorta "self regulates"?

    Annnnnnd ... I'm not wearing it in my gloves, shoes, nor undershorts to give rise to a skin rash or such, either. Negligible exposure to ME. Enduring exposure to the metal.


    Like I said.

    A person has to get older and stoopider before some of the more OBVIOUS s**t in a long life has time to trickle in!

    Weird s**t, weirder the better, we ponder over. At high priority.

    Obvious we MISS.

    You'd have to know human nature?


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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    I forgot to mention finish, I give the insides of wood boxes a few coats of poly, even if I use an oil finish on the outside.
    The highest dollar shotgun cases are often made of white oak, and covered in leather.
    Another option is to add metal plate in places, like Gerstner drawer bottoms, it increases the space considerably, and keeps out the termites.
    Works a treat, too. Good on yah!

    I don't even route OVER the left coast when off to Asia!

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    Lee Valley Tools sells the felt flocking material to line routed out wooden shapes in felt fuzz.
    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...9-flocking-kit



    Brush on glue, shaker on the flocking fuzz, tap it around and dump the excess.

    It's really comparable to they way would would grease and flour a cake pan.

  17. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven-Canada View Post
    Lee Valley Tools sells the felt flocking material to line routed out wooden shapes in felt fuzz.
    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...9-flocking-kit



    Brush on glue, shaker on the flocking fuzz, tap it around and dump the excess.

    It's really comparable to they way would would grease and flour a cake pan.
    I think /Ron Popiel has a simpler answer....https://www.amazon.com/Looking-Color.../dp/B0026SGLWK

  18. #57
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    Ha Ha! Everyone will admire the thick beautiful hair on your palms, and hairy boxes.

  19. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven-Canada View Post
    Lee Valley Tools sells the felt flocking material to line routed out wooden shapes in felt fuzz.
    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...9-flocking-kit



    Brush on glue, shaker on the flocking fuzz, tap it around and dump the excess.

    It's really comparable to they way would would grease and flour a cake pan.
    Gawd Nooooo!

    That s**t was all the rage when I was in JR HS! Seemed half of America was addicted to TV adverts:

    "Just Flock it!"

    Buying a tinplate-tube hand-pumped overgrown "Flit" bug-spray "Flocking gun" and all sorts of colours of short-chopped strands of - Nylon? "Dynel" polyester? was it?

    And then.. even taught in art class AND "Industral Arts" SHOP class...
    fools were slopping the glue-paint on bass boats, automobile ceilings, metal dashboards, window frames, kid's furniture, toilet seats.... their girfriend's jeans if not also her ass... EVERYTHING in reach..

    "got FLocked".

    It didn't last.

    The fad or the Flocking F**k.

    Technique is OLD.. still around.. industrialized and saner. Mostly. Seems the short fibers get into the lungs.. kinda like Asbestos?

    From a Wiki article:

    Flocking (texture) - Wikipedia

    Extract:
    Health issues
    Main article: Flock worker's lung
    Flocking can expose workers to small nylon particulates, which inhaled can cause flock worker's lung, a type of interstitial lung disease. Other exposure in the flocking industry can include acrylic adhesives, ammonium ether of potato starch, heat transfer oil, tannic acid, and zeolite.[3]
    So NOW it is no longer the cover EVERYTHING (and badly!) eyesore of a FAD it was for a while.

    Thank God in her infinite mercy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    Ha Ha! Everyone will admire the thick beautiful hair on your palms, and hairy boxes.
    Just buy her a razor.

    Help her out ... so she doesn't get a crick in her neck.

    Less pain than a "bikini wax".

    Or so the growns-up tell me.

    For your SELF?

    Might try the "Sterno" jellied-alcohol and Zippo lighter trick?

    That'll break you of "repetitious" bad-habits in a New York Minute!

    What's not to like about THAT?


  21. #60
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    Nice job on the rifle case donie.

    I know you have more sense than to knock the rifle as "just a 22" lol...


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