Call yourself a machist? Cut a meshing pair of these.
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 50
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,718
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    41
    Likes (Received)
    4415

    Default Call yourself a machist? Cut a meshing pair of these.

    Here's a stupifying solution looking for a problem.

    Hyperboloidal Gears 3D Printed 75 Deg. Skewed Axis Animation and Assembly - Hyperboloid - YouTube

    Next step, helical hyperboloidal gears

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    16,233
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    10820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    Here's a stupifying solution looking for a problem.

    Hyperboloidal Gears 3D Printed 75 Deg. Skewed Axis Animation and Assembly - Hyperboloid - YouTube

    Next step, helical hyperboloidal gears
    Usta beee.. a Machinashitist....

    What I am NOW .. you radical agitating TEASE! ... is just one more jealous Old Fart a wishing and hungerin' I had me one of them 3-D printers he used ... (that part is EASY!) ...that could spit-out 4XXX pre-hard.. 8620.. or Nickel-Aluminium BRONZE!

    Which is NOT so easy.... YET!

    Especially when you get the same follow-on You Tube as I did!

    Photogrammetry!!!

    How to Copy (almost) Any Object - YouTube

    Keep 'em coming, Forrest!

    There is still more to life than "subtractive" masheenin' on fossilizing Old Iron!

    The Operators, if not also our machines..


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    wales.uk
    Posts
    1,351
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    205
    Likes (Received)
    246

    Default

    Suppose a cnc could do it, old school you’d be stuck with a gorton copy mill if you needed a copy, either way a challenge I’m sure
    Mark

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4933
    Likes (Received)
    1727

    Default

    Can't they do things like that on a multi axis wire, the gears part?

    Brent

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2635
    Likes (Received)
    3961

    Default

    I didn't see operations to add internal threads for the small fasteners, were they printed right in the parts?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12
    Likes (Received)
    22

    Default

    5 axis wire should do it

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4933
    Likes (Received)
    1727

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I didn't see operations to add internal threads for the small fasteners, were they printed right in the parts?
    Yes, we are printing threads in toolsteel where I'm at. Shity looking threads but they buy them.

    Brent

  8. Likes Mud liked this post
  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,181
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7668
    Likes (Received)
    2732

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    Here's a stupifying solution looking for a problem.
    Couldn't the same be achieved with a set of 45* helix-angle gears? - That is, transfer power 90* off-axis?

  10. Likes Bobw liked this post
  11. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    2,136
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1358
    Likes (Received)
    2732

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I didn't see operations to add internal threads for the small fasteners, were they printed right in the parts?
    A lot of times you can use a regular screw as a self-tapper, with the right pilot hole size. I've printed some threads into parts, but little stuff like that which requires very little torque to 'form tap' with the screw... I might just print it as a regular pilot hole. For stuff that matters, an embedded slot or hexagon for a captive nut is best.

  12. Likes Mud liked this post
  13. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    16,233
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    10820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jashley73 View Post
    Couldn't the same be achieved with a set of 45* helix-angle gears? - That is, transfer power 90* off-axis?
    He is not at 90 degress here. Said it was what 75 degrees?

    Whatever the application NEEDS is the actual point.

    Historically, "universal solution" HAS BEEN to come in at right-angles, then rotate a second set of right-angle gears at any arbitrary angle 'round that output shaft. Works well, is all over the place for hundreds of years.

    But takes more space ... and two sets of gears, rather than but the one.

    3-D is one of the most USEFUL of game-changers since casting was expanded from holes in the ground and sand molds to precision metal dies and alloys that came out ready to use.

    It is also perhaps the fastest improving technology yet introduced since the Industrial Revolution began.

    Since the same CNC tools aready proven underpin it, it can also allow production at arbitrary distances from design, R&D, and testing.

    IF.. mankind can avoid obliterating ourselves long enough to reach out for the stars?

    3-D printing.. or something several steps yet BEYOND it.. will play a MAJOR role.

  14. Likes allloutmx liked this post
  15. #11
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,208
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    589

    Default

    And you termite are the fastest deterioration of a human! As you call it "a rotted mind"!

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,181
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7668
    Likes (Received)
    2732

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jashley73 View Post
    Couldn't the same be achieved with a set of 45* helix-angle gears? - That is, transfer power 90* off-axis?
    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    He not 90 degress here. it as waht 75 degrees/ Whateer the application NEEDs is the point.
    So let me ask it another way, in case the implied meaning wasn't clear enough previously... Couldn't the same be achieved with a set of [X / 2] helix-angle gears? - That is, transfer power [X] off-axis?

  17. Likes Mud, Bobw liked this post
  18. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2635
    Likes (Received)
    3961

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jashley73 View Post
    So let me ask it another way, in case the implied meaning wasn't clear enough previously... Couldn't the same be achieved with a set of [X / 2] helix-angle gears? - That is, transfer power [X] off-axis?

    I can't see why not. Like bevel hypoid gears. That the axes are non-intersecting severely raises the degree of difficulty, might require a single purpose specialty gear cutting machine or wire as mentioned above.

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    6,074
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jashley73 View Post
    So let me ask it another way, in case the implied meaning wasn't clear enough previously... Couldn't the same be achieved with a set of [X / 2] helix-angle gears? - That is, transfer power [X] off-axis?
    Yes. You can cut bevels at any angle you want. And no one in their right mind would make gears with face widths like that. This guy mostly needs a big jar of KY jelly for his hand.

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,181
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7668
    Likes (Received)
    2732

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Yes. You can cut bevels at any angle you want. And no one in their right mind would make gears with face widths like that. This guy mostly needs a big jar of KY jelly for his hand.

  21. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1470
    Likes (Received)
    373

    Default

    i dont see how this couldnt be cut on a 5 axis mill, am i missing something?
    prob not the most efficient way to do it, but for sure doable.

  22. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    16,233
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    10820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by empwoer View Post
    i dont see how this couldnt be cut on a 5 axis mill, am i missing something?
    prob not the most efficient way to do it, but for sure doable.
    As with Herringbone gears.. after long pondering over whether their intersection should be a sharp chevron or a complex curve, modern analysis proved a GAP is actually stronger and more enduring AS WELL AS easier to generate!

    Note the fine detail as his "demo" hourglass gears approach their least diameter?

    "Only because he COULD" Putting on airs, actually.

    No need to GO there at all. Lose nothing of importance if there is more "air", less material in there.

    Make the "real" power-transfer section simpler, faster, and easier to cut.

    Motor-vehicle offset hypoid differential gears are only a narrow "ring", after all. Not all that often they fail, is it?

  23. #18
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,421
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1255
    Likes (Received)
    1783

    Default

    Note that the question is about being a machist. He said nothing about machinists.

    I just thought I'd point that out for you...........


  24. Likes empwoer, Joe Miranda, fusker, Oldwrench liked this post
  25. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    6,074
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by empwoer View Post
    i dont see how this couldnt be cut on a 5 axis mill, am i missing something?
    prob not the most efficient way to do it, but for sure doable.
    DMG does this at shows, 4 axis is enough. Sometimes 3. In fact it's kinda the new (ten years or so anyhow) thing for big parts, it's way slower than a big generator but much more versatile.

    But still would never make the face width like that.

  26. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    16,233
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    10820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChipSplitter View Post
    Note that the question is about being a machist. He said nothing about machinists.

    I just thought I'd point that out for you...........

    So we should correct it? To what?

    "mock ass" seems to be what the guy with the spastic-plastic gears is getting the most of!

    Forrest is probably chuckling, either way! Cat amongst pigeons thing..

    You'd have to know Fold Arts and our sense of humour?



Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •