Camshaft Material
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  1. #1
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    Default Camshaft Material

    Hello all

    I was wondering if I could impose on everybody's opinion as to what material I should purchase for making a camshaft. I keep hearing of camshaft blanks. Where does one obtain these blanks?? Single lobe of course.
    I'm just playing around with different projects and was wondering if I'm able to make one. I have a series of different model engine projects that will require the making of a camshaft at some point. So this winter will be the winter I learn to do them. I have access to a lathe and milling machine, but lack the material. Also I live in Canada and sometimes we cannot get the same materials, so I'd like to hear from those that care to express what they have used in the past.

    Here's hoping for a positive result,

    Brian

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    What kind of engine?
    What RPM?

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    Oem is normally chilled cast iron. You can't duplicate that.

    for one off 8620 would be good after you carburize and grind it.

    Realize the cam and lifters must be slightly differing hardness.

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    8660 induction hardened is another popular one in the automotive world. but its for a model engine? what will the running time be?

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    For a fullsize V8 roller cam, 1075. Gets almost file hard (and it's through hard, so shock from an inverse or concave flank won't crush through the surface). If it's small just get some oil-hardening tool steel online...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leg17 View Post
    What kind of engine?
    What RPM?
    I have several different engines from Lee Hodgsons 9 & 18 cylinder radial engines, to twin cylinder Hoglets, to inline 4 cylinders to V8 print & plans. This is sort of my retirement projects.

    Rpm = various, but all model engine style.

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    A7 toolsteel might be a good choice- air hardening, low distortion - for one off cams, it works pretty well.

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    You want a case hardening steel, not a through hardening steel if you go the steel route. Lots of shock loads in a cam so a softer core with a hard face would probably be better. You could also do like a lot of modern engines and go with a powdered metal cam lobe and steel tube shafting. Heat shrink the lobe to the shaft.


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