Can lathe jaws be re-machined & if so , who does this kind of work. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    It is not a hard or complicated job to do it yourself. But certain precautions must be taken. I used a small abrasive point in a Dremel tool that was strapped to the tool post. I just aligned it by eye.

    1. Protecting the lathe from abrasive dust is a must. I used both aluminum foil and rags. Extra care was taken around the spindle bearing area and a piece of cotton was stuffed in the spindle bore. Yes, I know the bore has no openings to the bearings, but I did not want the abrasive dust to come out the rear opening and go places from there.

    2. The lathe jaws need to be tightened against something to force them against the scroll. This something needs to be out of the way of the grinding process. I used a ring and drilled some holes in the tops of the jaws for pins to grip it. Other arrangements have been used: search for "spider". Another useful internet search term may be "grinding lathe chuck jaws".



    3. This is a light touch operation so you don't really need a heavy set up. I created an extension for the Dremel tool to reach inside the chuck to the faces of the jaws. A standard Dremel collet nut and collet and I turned and threaded the extension with a tapered hole in the nose.



    4. Here it is in action. I turned the shop lights off for a more spectacular picture.



    As I said, use a light touch. At the most, you only take off a thousandth at a pass. Less for finishing.

    5. I took great care not to drop any of the abrasive dust on the machine when I was cleaning up. And the chuck was completely disassembled and all the parts completely cleaned.

    My results were mixed. The faces of the jaws were very nice after the grinding. And the angular alignment of a part gripped in them was quite good. But that chuck had scroll damage and it did exhibit different centering errors at different diameters. So overall, it was unsatisfactory and in the end, I purchased a new chuck.

    But it was an educational experience and a great light show.

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  3. #22
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    I could be wrong, but from the looks of the third photo, it would appear that someone has ground or machined these jaws before. The gripping surface has a radius while most factory jaws are ground flat.



    Quote Originally Posted by THEJKSHOW View Post
    Here is one of the jaws in question. ThanksAttachment 276833Attachment 276836Attachment 276838

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