Cast Iron Cookware VS. Steel -Metallurgical Question - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Have you tried pickling the cast iron pans?

    Seems like the first thing you should try is to process the cast iron the same way that you process the steel pans. If that doesn't work then you can start researching supposed pores in the metal.

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  3. #22
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    Welp if it's Field you are with, as that is their main selling point, I have 2 of their pans. Canola oil doesn't do jack to them, the only thing I've used so far that has stuck is frying some pork belly in them. Doesn't do to well though if you can't sell a pan because it's not Kosher/Halal. Although these by far are the best pans I've see for doing cornbread in. Tip the pan over and it just falls right out.

    Really waiting to see a Dutch oven from them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMasochism View Post
    Welp if it's Field you are with, as that is their main selling point, I have 2 of their pans. Canola oil doesn't do jack to them, the only thing I've used so far that has stuck is frying some pork belly in them. Doesn't do to well though if you can't sell a pan because it's not Kosher/Halal. Although these by far are the best pans I've see for doing cornbread in. Tip the pan over and it just falls right out.

    Really waiting to see a Dutch oven from them.
    Canola oil is for de-greasing dirty machinery and hands rather more gently than some other options.

    It has no business in the kitchen around heat, nor even on cold salads.

    Beef tallow rather than pork, some "jurisdictions", mutton for others, "Ghee" has few political enemies.....thence to Macadamia, Avocado, Olive, Coconut...

    Or no oil of any kind... rather more common than some folks might be aware of, given a Wok is utilized to boil or steam as often as for stir-frying.

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    You guys are bored apparently.

    As a Chef and a Machinist...I don't really give a fuck. I don't expect CI to be non-stick(really) low-stick maybe. As for seasoning the problem with it is that over the years the Rachel Reys and Julia Childs' (I miss that drunk old bitch) have impressed on people that Seasoning is a thing you can do as in a treatment. In my experience, it just isn't. REAL seasoning just happens over time and care. OTOH, when I get a new CI pan I coat it with Olive and turn it upside down over FIRE, until the pan itself starts to smoke. Cool, do it again, cool, do it again. Seasoning is a thing of art and flavor, not non-stickiness. As far a s Steel pans go---throw that junk in the trash.

    R

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    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    As far a s Steel pans go---throw that junk in the trash.
    I did exactly that.. or repurposed it into the shop for parts cleaning and sorting.

    Once I found out how good the GOOD stuff [1] really is and how to use it to best advantage.

    CAVEAT: I'm a dedicated "slow food" chef, rather more entrees and sides as not, no salt in my work area, nor refined sugar, either. No need. Asia, the Med, & c. have more elegant ways to please.

    Long cook times, and low temps, relatively, as to heat levels. Components even of an ignorant beef stew cooked separately, THEN married-up. Not in the game of creating any more carcinogens than we already surround ourselves with.

    Works for us. Med, Cantonese, and more. If we LIKE it? It must be Cantonese cooking, even if it might more easily be found on a Bayerisches Speisekarte!

    Fusion. ANYTHING good is adopted into South China.

    Far cry from a B'in Law's "special" Christmas dinner his own personal cook prepared one year, Beijing.

    Variety? Would you believe thirty-two distinct "dishes"?

    And every damned one of them dumplings!




    [1] Mostly Spring (Swiss) & Demeyere (Belgian), but bought many years ago, costlier and heavier-made than most of what shows in their lines NOW. "I got mine" it is durable, damned hard to hurt, will outlast my need of it. Hong Kong selection and Virginia, are "in depth" choices fit for a purpose, never marketeer's "sets".

  8. #26
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    Sesame seed oil , Olive Oil or lard.

    The tools that your using may not be sharp enough or are rolling the edge so your loosing porosity .

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    This is relevant to my interests, my new Blackstone griddle arrives today.

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    FWIW, the local auction house tells me the bottom has fallen out of the Griswold market.
    Wilers Auction House

    Some of the prices I have been seeing, you could buy an antique Griswold,
    and use it for your everyday cooking.

  12. #29
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    I just bought a Griswold #8 chicken pan for $90, same price as the comparable Lodge new. I figured I'd see what the fuss was about with Griswold.

    I could have bought a Vaughn, who were bought out by Griswold for $30 less. Both of them had a milled finish and were lighter than the Lodge.

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    Flax seed oil is bulletproof.
    I wouldn't cook with it, but it provides a very stable base on a cast iron pan that has had its seasoning removed (generally by burning it off in the cleaning cycle of an oven or by exposure to similar temps)

    I have had similar issues with seasoning durability in cheap cast iron pans that I have milled or ground to make smooth. I found that if I tossed them in the blast cabinet and hit them with aluminum oxide until they were white, it didn't make them noticebly rough, but it markedly improved the "seasonability"

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