Centering a hub and bolt circle - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Its easy, when the hub is in the lathe use a sharp point tool and scribe the bolt hole ring (5 1/2 inch for 5 on 5 1/2 pattern) this is to check your work when you drill your holes....center the bore up on the mill and count turns and use bolt hole tables in the machinist handbook...Phil

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    hub centering the wheel: any conical nuts/bolts will centre the wheel. thats why the "centering" hub has 0.004" plus of play and plastic bushings are used.

    as for prying off wheels/rotors: use the power steering.

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    The average Ford F-350 does not have power steering. Not on the rear end, anyway.

    Probably the best trick is to use the threaded brake caliper bracket holes, along with some nuts and bolts, to force the rotor off. Lots of penetrating oil helps, especially if you make it yourself using mineral spirits, transmission fluid, paprika, Oil of Thyme, and two teaspoons of sulfuric acid.

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    A printer is a surprisingly accurate layout tool. you dust the back of the paper with super77 and center punch your holes. No dro or table of numbers. If you are fancy with a laser printer you can place the fresh print ink side down on the disk and dab acetone on it ant the ink will transfer to the steel. Works best with fresh xerox copies. It is a gun engraver trick that has bailed me out more than once.

  5. #45
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  6. #46
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    I think many OEMs that appears hub centric are not.
    One could get out the the bore gauges and mics to check on new. I do not think these are one thou fits.
    It is close for ease and speed of assembly and for sure can rust up the gap with age.
    Agree that .010 out on stud spacing or circle center not very good.
    And then there is expected or allowed runout of the tire itself mounted on the rim. Unsure why people think this to be zero.
    Today is different in making such than 30-60 years back. Nobody wants a small vibration in a new car so lots of money and effort spent.
    Bob

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    Back in the late 80's, an older guy 'Frank' was a highly respected dynamic balancing expert at the company I worked for. He had decades of experience in balancing high RPM turbines and motors, big ones at that.

    Frank had a faded 70's Plymouth Duster, and he still ran bias ply tires. He did something that very few people are willing to do - when he would buy new tires, he would put them in a tire shaving machine/lathe and cut the tread until the tire was 'round'. No way will most people cut tread off a new tire. But he did, and of course would also balance them to his own liking. Every once in a while, someone would talk shit about how smooth their new car rode to the point that Frank would let them drive his Duster down the highway a few miles. That inevitably shut them up.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    The average Ford F-350 does not have power steering. Not on the rear end, anyway.

    Probably the best trick is to use the threaded brake caliper bracket holes, along with some nuts and bolts, to force the rotor off. Lots of penetrating oil helps, especially if you make it yourself using mineral spirits, transmission fluid, paprika, Oil of Thyme, and two teaspoons of sulfuric acid.
    You put the lug nuts back on, and leave them backed off 1/8" - 1/4"
    and then drive it. Usually a few feet works, sometimes you need to drive further.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    hub centering the wheel: any conical nuts/bolts will centre the wheel.
    In fact, if they fight, the hub fit will win. If you get a bad wheel with conical seat you can see it, the mating surface will be worn off-center. The seats are strong but not strong enough to pull metal through metal.

    thats why the "centering" hub has 0.004" plus of play and plastic bushings are used.
    .004" is way more than enough to center an automotive wheel. The tires run out way more than that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    You put the lug nuts back on, and leave them backed off 1/8" - 1/4"
    and then drive it. Usually a few feet works, sometimes you need to drive further.
    Ouch, as much as I hate this method it often works.
    Why, Because the wheel is not hub centered and some up/down shift breaks it free. It is not just the hub the wheel attaches itself to.
    In a truly hub centered one needs to toss the vehicle into a turn at speed. Snug it back up and go back into the shop.
    1/8 to 1/4 inch gap seems a bit large.
    Pain in the butt on a seized wheel. Have ruined some rims doing the sledge hammer, penetrating oil and block of wood method.
    At some point one gets so mad that you no longer care. Darn thing is coming off no matter what.
    Ever been so frustrated that you pull out the gas hatchet?....... "You are a piece of metal in a machine shop... you will yield to me".
    To each his own.
    Bob

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  12. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Ouch,
    At some point one gets so mad that you no longer care. Darn thing is coming off no matter what.
    Ever been so frustrated that you pull out the gas hatchet?....... "You are a piece of metal in a machine shop... you will yield to me".
    To each his own.
    Bob
    0

    did you not add the paprika or to much thyme to the oil? A little sear on the edges doesn't hurt anything anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Ouch, as much as I hate this method it often works.
    Why, Because the wheel is not hub centered and some up/down shift breaks it free. It is not just the hub the wheel attaches itself to.
    In a truly hub centered one needs to toss the vehicle into a turn at speed.
    Disagree. The locating surface is not meant to be load-bearing, it's skinny. Put a thousand pounds on it offset, and then drive a foot and it's going to slip off. Locating portion is not generally directly under the center of the tire.

    I don't think they locate car tires to the nth degree of precision, doesn't really matter so much, but the lug nut seats aren't always the primary means of locating. One should be aware of that if using an old hub for a model, that's all. No big.

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