Chuck size for a 9' benchtop lathe
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    Default Chuck size for a 9' benchtop lathe

    Hi, newbie here. I've been wanting to get into machining for a while now, as a hobby, and I finally purchased my first piece of equipment. It's a Wabeco D2400 german benchtop lathe (bought used for 950 USD equivalent):

    eszterga.jpg

    It's 220mm swing with 500mm between centers, so around 9' x 20', comes with a 100mm/4' three jaw chuck. The first addition I want to make is definitely a 4 jaw independent chuck, and I think the best size would probably be 5' which I can get new for around a 130 bucks. I live in Romania, so old USSR gear is available for cheaper, but the sizes start at 160mm/6'-ish. I can get a 160mm 4 jaw independent for 50 bucks or so. Do you think this little lathe could handle a chuck that size or should I just bite the bullet on a new, more appropriately sized chuck?

    Also, I want to just pour a big slab of concrete and bolt the lathe down to it to improve stability, do you think it noticeably helps? If you have any quick and easy improvement/first step ideas, I'm all ears.

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    More information on the lathe here, but no there is no comment on the OEM chuck offerings.

    Page Title

    But it is stated that the spindle has a 3 Morse taper with a 20 mm bore. That information indicates to me that you should not use a heavy chuck, or one larger than 125 mm in diameter. The lathe is very lightly built, so a concrete base would probably not be better than a thick timber base.

    Save your concrete for a time when you get a heavier machine. Most small shops start with light machines and gradually improve with more industrial quality as time goes by and experience is gained.

    Larry

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    You should have probably read this first
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...elines-137724/
    JR

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRIowa View Post
    You should have probably read this first
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...elines-137724/
    JR
    Yabutt....it's not the same shade of green....

    So it may be OK.

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    I also wondered about the 9'?
    Is that length times width times height?
    If thats swing, it's up there with the bit Gray VTL we had,
    JR

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    IMO a 6'' 4 jaw will be okay, just bear in mind imbalance and speeds .....take a little extra care.


    To the naysayers

    It's actually German, so that knocks one of the no - no's out, .........please bear in mind the OP is in Romania where I suspect it's hard to find machine tools of any sort, so the OP probably had to take what he could get.

    Ref Page Title

    Or put another way -can we lighten up guys ............oh and the 9' is actually typo ,........not that any of you ever make mistakes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    ..not that any of you ever make mistakes.
    Ya but it was because of heavy drinking at the time.
    Milacron might have a soft spot, but I'm not sure a benchtop lathe is one of them.
    JR

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    The second section of this forum is a division for South Bend lathes:
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/
    "The most Popular American Lathe"
    They are much more tolerant in that part of the forum. And the size of your lathe would fit right in. I have a South Bend 9C (also bench top) that I still use regularly in my commercial shop. The SB came with a 6 inch chuck as mentioned by Larry V. I later got a better quality 5 inch that I am happier with, more because of the quality of the chuck than the size. So 5 or 6 inch would be very good.

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    In the second section of this forum is a division for South Bend lathes:
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/
    "The most Popular American Lathe"
    They are much more tolerant in that part of the forum. And the size of your lathe would fit right in. I have a South Bend 9C (also bench top) that I still use regularly in my commercial shop. The SB came with a 6 inch chuck as mentioned by Larry V. I later got a better quality 5 inch that I am happier with, more because of the quality of the chuck than the size. So 5 or 6 inch would be very good.

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    The chuck makes the lathe so would spring for the better chuck..what ever that may be.
    know how and when to leave a skim and go to centers when needing close.

    10 extra minuets going to centers can make a part 100% better.

    keep a lot of stubs because they can be chucked and make a one use chucked mandrel.Yes with a having slight taper or fit then lock at taper. Some times great for back-side at flipping part.

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    How big a diameter can you swing over the apron? probably no need for a chuck any bigger then that. That seems to be the relation to the size of a steady rest for a lathe.
    My Father's 9" south bend lathe came with a 5" 3 jaw and a 6" 4 jaw chuck.
    Bill D.
    Modesto, CAlifornia USA
    Last edited by Bill D; 02-12-2018 at 09:03 PM.

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    Regarding other improvements, an Aloris-style quick change tool post and an assortment of tool holders will make your life much easier.

    I really like my Variable Frequency Drive, too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    Regarding other improvements, an Aloris-style quick change tool post and an assortment of tool holders will make your life much easier.

    I really like my Variable Frequency Drive, too!
    One of the pictures on Tony's Wabeco page shows a lathe with a little size Aa 40 position quick change tool post, like a German Multi-Suisse or AXA brand. German stuff is probably easier to get in Europe than an American Aloris. Does Aloris make one that small? Are there European copies?

    Larry

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    Can you thread with this lathe? I do not see any provision for changing gear ratios for different thread spacing.
    Bill D

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    Looks like a highly regarded German hobby and craft lathe and seems the OPs machine a steal at $900 because it seems they may run close to $3K (?)

    Bed ways look like steel rolls , Threads .4 to 4. Mm and Imp 10-32, weight about 130lbs, spindle bore 3/4
    *One thread I read made it seem the threading ability was an option(?).
    Looks like a larger CNC might be $15K or so,
    https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/i...prices2015.pdf

    looks like the D6000 a cast iron bed 10-24 with .25-7 mm and 10-40 TPI for about $4K
    inductively hardened and ground guideways..1 1/8 spindle bore optional for +$200. ball screw +$1400

    *looks like the (a) better small lathe for the guy who is not so set on a lowest price. IMHO

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Can you thread with this lathe? I do not see any provision for changing gear ratios for different thread spacing.
    Bill D
    I do have the optional change gear set for both metric and imperial threading. Funnily enough, it's a toothed belt + gears setup, which, together with the cylindrical guide ways makes for an oddball machine. A new chinese import similar size would've cost me almost twice as much, and old USSR gear is available, but usually starts at 2000 pounds weight, which i didn't want to commit to as a beginner. Thanks!

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    Change gears Z 16,18,20,22, 24, 28,32,34, 36, &40 optional..
    One might call the company for the price..

    OP bought a used machine so should not compare with new..Likely this is a better machine than a China bargain lathe.
    Likely well worth the purchase of change gears.(if in good condition)

    $140. plus postage a good price for gears.
    Wabeco Set of 1 Change Gears

    Yes best to call to be sure for the OPs lathe..

    Rusty Ebay one with no change gears for almost $5K
    PRAZI II APOLLO WABECO PRECISION LATHE D24-DLX + ELECTRONIC FEED 8 X 2" 115V | eBay

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    I find this:

    Lathe D24 - Lathes

    Looks like a decent small lathe.

    As the OP is from Romania I'll give him some slack for ' instead of ". He writes better English than some of us in the USA.

    Paul

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    3201 euros = $3950
    plus 399ur for 1 1/2 spindle bore, 110ur for change gear set..

    So about $4590 US dollars for a nice but small lathe...
    still likely a nice lathe..

    Don't know, Don't think it has an offset tail feature for a taper..


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