Cleaning ugly oily floor hack saw mess 30 years worth...
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Missoula Mt
    Posts
    428
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    165

    Default Cleaning ugly oily floor hack saw mess 30 years worth...

    What is the easy/ best way to clean up the mess from a old hacksaw area? Hydrolic saw with a leak,cutting oil, rusty chips ect 30 years worth about, shop boy didnt do job, hi hi 20x20ft...cement floor and wall...Thanks Phil

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana USA
    Posts
    326
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    203

    Default

    Would the area be OK for you to use a pressure washer? i.e a drain, nothing to get damaged from water, etc. I might try using a combination of emulsifiers or solvetns to break down the grease/oil followed up by detergents in a pressure washer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    491
    Likes (Received)
    3801

    Default

    There are hand maneuvered rotary floor cleaners for power washers that do a pretty good job of containing the splash. They look about like a round small push mower. You still have lots of water to control, but a couple of squeegees should handle that. A good thing about the rotary floor cleaners is they take a lot of the reaction out of the nozzle. You can handle a gpm/pressure combination that you would never be able to handle in a wand.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    2,693
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    393
    Likes (Received)
    774

    Default

    Soak it with solvent or mineral spirits, scrape with shovel, cover with absorbent- sawdust or kitty litter. Let sit a day. Suck that up. Then use Zep Industrial Purple - scrub it and suck it up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,197
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    425

    Default

    I sprayed down my Racine saw with Gunk engine cleaner. Let it set a few minutes then pressure washed it with warm water. In this case the motor and electrical panel had already been removed for cleaning and upgrading so there was no need to cover them. I also tipped the saw on it's side and flushed out all the caked on swarf in the reservoir. The degreaser dissolved the crusty hydraulic oil so it could be flushed down the drain The swarf could be swept up and disposed of. Just make sure you clean up the swarf before it dries. Once dry it's hard to move and leaves stains on the floor.


    As a side note you probably should have fired the "shop boy" 29 years earlier. I was the one assigned that particular duty when I first started in a machine shop. Luckily it had been done on a regular basis before I arrived so it wasn't that big of a deal. To put it in the proper context is was a far more pleasant chore than helping my father (a plumber) clean up sewage spills from broken pipes.

  6. Likes kustomizer, Phil in Montana liked this post
  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,757
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    560
    Likes (Received)
    969

    Default

    I'm here to tell you that oil loves concrete.

    If it's been there for that long it will keep resurfacing IME.

    Clean it with muriatic acid and pressure washer, in 3 days it will be oily again.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    4,723
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1824
    Likes (Received)
    2266

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    I sprayed down my Racine saw with Gunk engine cleaner. Let it set a few minutes then pressure washed it with warm water. In this case the motor and electrical panel had already been removed for cleaning and upgrading so there was no need to cover them. I also tipped the saw on it's side and flushed out all the caked on swarf in the reservoir. The degreaser dissolved the crusty hydraulic oil so it could be flushed down the drain The swarf could be swept up and disposed of. Just make sure you clean up the swarf before it dries. Once dry it's hard to move and leaves stains on the floor.


    As a side note you probably should have fired the "shop boy" 29 years earlier. I was the one assigned that particular duty when I first started in a machine shop. Luckily it had been done on a regular basis before I arrived so it wasn't that big of a deal. To put it in the proper context is was a far more pleasant chore than helping my father (a plumber) clean up sewage spills from broken pipes.
    Thats funny stuff there. A couple jobs ago they were so into environmental protection that all the machines that used coolant had to have a sheet metal box under them that was twice the volume of the tank to contain any spills.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    5,743
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5318
    Likes (Received)
    5434

    Default

    100% agree with Dan from Oakland. Scrape it up before trying to clean further. If it's really stuck I'd suggest a pneumatic floor scraper. I bought one from HF years ago for under a hundred and it holds up well if you keep it oiled with air tool oil. I bought mine for ice removal during one brutal winter.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Northern califorina, usa
    Posts
    378
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChipSplitter View Post
    I'm here to tell you that oil loves concrete.

    If it's been there for that long it will keep resurfacing IME.

    Clean it with muriatic acid and pressure washer, in 3 days it will be oily again.
    You got that right, oil permeates concrete. Long term equipment placement that spatters/drips etc oil just seeps into the upper layer of the concrete. We tried industrial chemicals ,hot high pressure washers, even knotted wire wheels. We finely hired a concrete grinding company to clean it up.
    I can't off the top of my head recall the correct name of the machine they used but it's the same machine they use to expose the pea gravel in concrete when polishing. They took about 1/8"or a little more off the top to get clean material.

  11. Likes J Grainger liked this post
  12. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    4,664
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2095

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dana gear View Post
    You got that right, oil permeates concrete.
    The sawdust will eventually soak up most of it. Enough so it doesn't look like an Exxon Valdez memorial, at the very least. You can help it along by adding some light solvent to the mess.

    And then your concrete isn't destroyed.

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana USA
    Posts
    326
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    203

    Default

    When we built our new shop in January we had the floor sealed and painted with a water based epoxy with a "high percentage of solids" (sales lit statement). Damn glad we did, it is SO much easier to keep clean. Our old shop was bare concrete and it was saturated with oil under several pieces of equipment.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    4,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5386
    Likes (Received)
    2547

    Default

    I have this small powered scrubber I bought at a garage sale that uses 2 6" brushes and that combined with purple power or ZEP floor cleaner does a decent job on the floors I've had to clean.

    The powered scrubbing makes things much better/faster.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,197
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Thats funny stuff there. A couple jobs ago they were so into environmental protection that all the machines that used coolant had to have a sheet metal box under them that was twice the volume of the tank to contain any spills.
    It seems there are different rules for different industries. There's a do it yourself car wash about a mile from our house. You'd be surprised what goes through there. I've seen everything from farm tractors to construction equipment to off road vehicles go through there. Sometimes the walls and floors are covered with all kinds of grease, oil, goo, and who knows what.

    That's where I cleaned my saw. I asked before I did it to avoid potential problems.

  16. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,149
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    The degreaser dissolved the crusty hydraulic oil so it could be flushed down the drain.
    Where I live, that is a huge no-no. A better way is to plug your drain and use a shop vac to suck up the effluent, then go out in a field and dig a hole and pour the waste fluid into it. The critters in the soil will eat it eventually. Way better environmentally.

    metalmagpie

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Missoula Mt
    Posts
    428
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    165

    Default

    Thanks guys, I scraped up the top stuff, used diesel fuel and scraped more, added floor dry and scrubbed.... let sit 3 days swiped up floor dry... then purple soap and water... a lot better but the oil is weeping up so now on to saw dust...Phil


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •