Correct technique for draw filing - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Great post. Seems we agree on some things, after all!

    We didn't have to dub the teeth. No shortage of files in varying degrees of wear back when they were used so much more often! One sort of "graded" them and used what they had wherever they gave appropriate results.
    You'd probably be shocked at how many things we agree on!

    But yeah, in a world full of folks that never really understood how a file works, it was a rare treat to be able to pick and choose, and occasionally rathole away a particularly good example of the art, so as to be able to rely upon it when needed!

    As an aside, if anyone really wants to see variety in files, the Grobet File Company catalog is a worthwhile way to spend a little of your bathroom reading time.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    You'd probably be shocked at how many things we agree on!
    Aye.. but that's most folk who have ever had to work to pay their bills and feed a famly.


    But yeah, in a world full of folks that never really understood how a file works, it was a rare treat to be able to pick and choose, and occasionally rathole away a particularly good example of the art, so as to be able to rely upon it when needed!

    As an aside, if anyone really wants to see variety in files, the Grobet File Company catalog is a worthwhile way to spend a little of your bathroom reading time.
    Herr Pelz had stocked us with Simmonds and Heller for production work - "double cut", more than anything else. An ambidextrous filer, I never liked either brand or the patterns we had. Not aggressive enough.

    OTOH, that may have driven his choice, hand-filing being still a batch-production task on a line of min-wage and bored-stiff housewives.

    My prefs have been Nicholson, (initially of the 1950's until ??) Vallorbs & Grobet "always" .. not much else...

  3. #43
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  5. #44
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    If you are doing it correctly, with a sharp file, you will see little “curlycue” chips form, and it will seem almost like magic, how can that much work be done with such little force?

    Yes, single cut for this is better, one of the the only things it’s better for, really.

    It hardy matters the stroke or the angle once you hit the sweet spot, so I just look to find it, it’s a zen thing.


    Yes, I do prefer the pull stroke generally to get there, but slow and steady over all else technique wise.


    “ a few files”? A FEW?? I’ve got literally hundreds. Needle, riffler, bastard, mill bastard, crossing, barrette, pillar, slotting, and all the French names, file nomenclature is some of the most colorful in the metalworking game.

    The traditional apprenticeship of a Japanese metalworker begins with a 3” rough cube of steel, and a file. The task is to produce a square block by hand. They say it usually takes 6 months to a year, and if you are really good it will be bigger than a sugar cube when your sensei finally says, “good!”

  6. #45
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    Dragging a file on the return stroke is allot like running your endmill backwards. All I can say for sure is, being a left handed guy, files don't cut for shit because the direction of cut is an unnatural motion to make for a southpaw.

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post

    The traditional apprenticeship of a Japanese metalworker begins with a 3” rough cube of steel, and a file. The task is to produce a square block by hand. They say it usually takes 6 months to a year, and if you are really good it will be bigger than a sugar cube when your sensei finally says, “good!”
    This used to be common in watchmaking too, and I've run a few guys through it. Start with maybe 2cm rough cube and finish near 1cm. A talented guy will take 2-3 days for the first one, then by the 3rd can do it in a few hours. This is checking with a mic and a little precision square (I have a super cute Mahr about and inch overall length). When they are within about 3 microns going all over with a Mit digimic I tell them to stop.

    Some guys just never quite make it past around 0.01mm though. Doesn't mean they don't turn out to be good or great watchmakers or machinists.

  8. #47
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    Dragging a file on the return stroke is allot like running your endmill backwards. All I can say for sure is, being a left handed guy, files don't cut for shit because the direction of cut is an unnatural motion to make for a southpaw.

  9. #48
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    Draw filing can be useful for many things. I sharpen lawn mower blades with a mill file and then use a variant of draw filing to remove small amounts of metal during final balancing.

  10. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mechanola View Post
    Awe man that was good! A translation would be welcome but I wouldn't mind a stock of the old boys best work in my drawer that's for sure!


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