cost of use calculation software
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  1. #1
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    Default cost of use calculation software

    Does anyone know of software that I can buy that helps calculate the cost to use tooling? I'm trying to justify better tooling but unless I can show it'll actually cost less to use more expensive tooling we're stuck with the tools we have. I'd also like to be able to check if we can push tools harder and replace them more often but save money because the total manufacturing hours would decrease.

    I'm looking for something that lets you enter in things like:
    -tool purchase price
    -volume removal rate
    -tool cycle life span
    -shop burden rate
    -etc.

    Our rep at MSC says they use a calculator for this but it's not for sale since it's only for sales reps.

    I could make a complicated excel file but I'm sure I'd forget some component and it would throw off the whole calculation and i wouldn't know it.

    thanks

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    Take a look at TST-Software. They may have what you are looking for. TST: Tooling Software Technology, LLC | Tooling Industry Software

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    It is called trial and error. Even if such a calculator was even close to useful it would be good for nothing but a semi educated guess. There are just too many variables involved. One of them is how the exact same tooling can vary from batch to batch at the same time variations in raw materials can be quite pronounced even from the same vendor purchased from the same mill. How many times do recommended feeds, speeds and depth of cut coming from tool reps work perfectly? Some stuff I have gotten away with running twice recommended rates and gotten great tool life, on the flip I have had to drop to 1/2 speed to keep from burning up tools.

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    There are several calculators available on the internet... there is one I am thinking of from a hold down company... can't remember there name.

    I make an excel spread sheet. Not that hard, not that complex, not that time consuming. Plug in fixed costs, plug in number of pieces, and I can see how different approaches and tooling weigh on the final cost.

    I did one recently that instead of using some common tools that would run maybe $80, I found a tool that was $180 that would save 2 setups. It knocked about $500 off the cost of the job. Hoping that gets me the job...

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    If you make your own Excel spreadsheet, one of two things will happen.

    1. It will work and convince management that new tools are needed.

    2. Some management, hot shot will quickly point out the problems and you can correct them and resubmit.

    I love Excel because it is a great tool and because, properly done, it makes a very impressive presentation. Even if it is wrong, it still looks great and impresses people.

    What I would look for is an Excel template that you can adopt and convert to your needs.

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    Default excel

    Excel does math and the math can include many factors
    .
    sudden tool failure often can have a random factor. that is for every 100 parts you can have 99 parts with no tooling problems. BUT the 1 failure you can use the lost time, material and tooling costs and use that to factor in "average" REAL tool life and costs.
    .
    that is often tool salesman can say a new tool will save $3000. a year but it can end up actually costing you $6000. more per year. the actual experienced data can have tremendous value.
    .
    so Excel math calculations can be more complex the more factors that are used but it ends up being more reliable accurate data. i often use the Excel average formula in calculations. for example actual sudden tool failure data adding 20 minutes to machining time per 100 parts. material, tooling and labor costs all add up

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    Thanks everyone. A lot of good info here. I think I'll pick a part and start working on an excel spread sheet for existing tooling vs tooling I'd like to change. I'm still open to software and I'll investigate that TST to see what they have to offer along with others the internet may have to offer.


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