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  1. #81
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    I started collecting/purchasing Craftsman tools going back to when I was a boy almost 50 years ago. I used and abused them for decades and other than a handful of sockets and a few screw drivers that I used well outside their intended use, I still have them and they work as good today as they did then.

    I also have a few SK tools but my USA made Craftsman never let me down. YMMV, but I have no regrets investing in my Craftsman hand tools. Their power tools? Well, that's a horse of another color, never liked most of them.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdlinger View Post
    Hi Stew! We did not make the digital wrenches you referenced. The 25 year old one was probably what they used to call "digitorque" that I cannot remember who made but the new(er) "tech wrenches" are made by a brand they bought in the 90's. The dial type you have is definitely made by us, and is probably a model TESI20 like the pic below. Those are the type of torque wrenches that started our company when my grandfather invented it in 1938. If fact, unless I want his ghost to haunt me I should correct my wording to "torque instrument haha. When he and my dad would put on their tweed suits and go to Snap-On shows to sell and educate people on our products they believed if you call them torque "wrenches" people will treat them like....wrenches, whereas if you called them "instruments" people would be a little more careful with them funny old tales of the way things used to be.

    Stay safe!

    Matt

    Attachment 288290

    You're spot on Matt. My first one was indeed called Digitorque, & the crap one was a Tech-Wrench. I've no idea who makes their current one's, but so far both my 3/8th & 1/2 inch have been totally reliable.
    Indeed my dial type ia a TES120, & you (& your grandfather) will be pleased to know I treat it & all my torque wrenches as precision instruments....They never get left out, & always get returned to their boxes after use.
    #

    I also have a couple of your split-beam 'instruments' as back up for my 3/8th & 1/2 inch digital one's. A better mechanical torque intrument is yet to be invented!


    Cheers.


    Stew.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bdog507 View Post
    You're spot on Matt. My first one was indeed called Digitorque, & the crap one was a Tech-Wrench. I've no idea who makes their current one's, but so far both my 3/8th & 1/2 inch have been totally reliable.
    Indeed my dial type ia a TES120, & you (& your grandfather) will be pleased to know I treat it & all my torque wrenches as precision instruments....They never get left out, & always get returned to their boxes after use.
    #

    I also have a couple of your split-beam 'instruments' as back up for my 3/8th & 1/2 inch digital one's. A better mechanical torque intrument is yet to be invented!


    Cheers.


    Stew.
    Hi Stew! I believe the same company of theirs has always made the techwrench so they just must be getting the hang of it.

    The dial type you have will last a life time as there is virtually no wear components. The split beam click wrenches are, indeed, the best click-type torque instrument for many applications. My father designed it in the late 70’s and we made them for SO through 2002ish. Any part number with an “E” at the end is the copy of ours from after they left us and copied the design. Of course the patents were expired by then so it’s not like anything too shady was going on, but a real kick in the knickers after 65 years of exclusivity haha!

    There are many parts in our products that this forum has helped make better! I love it!

    Take care!

    Matt

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    I thought Blackhawk was the name put on Snap-On tools that were wear items, things they didn't want to replace for free?
    I remember when Home Depot first had Husky hand tools. They were different looking than the old Husky, but still made in the USA with a lifetime replacement. Now Husky is just cheap crap from china, how did that happen?
    I used a husky set on the railroad and beat the absolute living crap out of them. They held up just fine, and the set was $100 on a Christmas sale or something. With Ingersoll rand, I probably had less than $800 into what was in my box and made out OK. I would put husky as a cut above harbor freight and very often the same price. I don’t think this was always the case, but it seems like it now.

    In stark contrast, my coworker, who’d didn’t have a year in when I started, had $15,000 worth in Snap-On financing. Brand new tool box with everything you could think of in it. He didn’t have anything more than I did, so I figure he paid most of what he did for the “lifetime guarantee” on tools that were never going to break. I think they repo’ed his tools, now he’s working as a delivery guy or something.

    Disclaimer: I was a shitty mechanic. I’m glad I didn’t stick with it too. It was a lot of fun, but the pay sucked and the hours were long.

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  6. #85
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    Hey Nerdlinger,

    Couple pix attached of my Snap On torque "instruments". Did your company make these ?

    Big torque wrench is 1" drive, 1300Nm.

    Bench top 3/8" drive tool probably used to verify other small torque wrenches ?

    Sorry to all for drifting off original topic.

    Thanks,

    excello









    img_4660.jpgimg_4658.jpg

  7. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by excello View Post
    Hey Nerdlinger,

    Couple pix attached of my Snap On torque "instruments". Did your company make these ?

    Big torque wrench is 1" drive, 1300Nm.

    Bench top 3/8" drive tool probably used to verify other small torque wrenches ?

    Sorry to all for drifting off original topic.

    Thanks,

    excello









    img_4660.jpgimg_4658.jpg
    Hi Excello! Those are both ours...and old! haha! You can tell by the old Snap-On logo...sometime in the late 90's they changed their logo to have the hyphen go through the "O" and an end wrench in the "S". The tool would have come with a 4' extension handle...it looks like the one in the pic is more like 2' long, but as long as it gives you the leverage you need good for you!

    In an attempt to steer this back on track to the OP, we use the same design on those tools today as we did on the ones in your pic. Many of the processes have been improved but no cheapening of the components or materials. That entire plate and handle on your wrench get heat treated, as well as the dial guards that, well...guard the dial.

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  9. #87
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    Thanks Nerdlinger ! I'll send you a PM with more info and questions - if you don't mind?

    excello

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  11. #88
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    Just checked my Blackhawk 3/4 socket and wrench set and it says Blackhawk by Proto. Not sure if the name has always been associated with Proto or not. I think the name is now used on a second line of imports.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdlinger View Post
    Hi Stew! I believe the same company of theirs has always made the techwrench so they just must be getting the hang of it.

    The dial type you have will last a life time as there is virtually no wear components. The split beam click wrenches are, indeed, the best click-type torque instrument for many applications. My father designed it in the late 70’s and we made them for SO through 2002ish. Any part number with an “E” at the end is the copy of ours from after they left us and copied the design. Of course the patents were expired by then so it’s not like anything too shady was going on, but a real kick in the knickers after 65 years of exclusivity haha!

    There are many parts in our products that this forum has helped make better! I love it!

    Take care!

    Matt

    Good morning all.


    Full marks to your father for coming up with the design Matt. What I particularly like is the fact that one doesn't have to un-wind it after use, & can leave it set.

    I bet it was a kick in the backside, but that's big companies for you! Do you have a European distributor for your instruments?

    Getting back to the original topic of this thread. A lot of companies nowadays just trade on the name, & Snap-On is slowly becoming one of those. As I said earlir, their Blue-Point range have always been re-badged tools made by others, & I do wonder how much of their tools they actually make these days.
    I don't recall ever seeing Craftsman tools in the UK, but I would imagine it's a real disappointment to those who bought Craftsman tools many years ago, & find today's Craftsman tools to be inferior in every way....aka cheaply made tat!


    Cheers.


    Stew.

  13. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bdog507 View Post
    What I particularly like is the fact that one doesn't have to un-wind it after use, & can leave it set.

    I bet it was a kick in the backside, but that's big companies for you! Do you have a European distributor for your instruments?

    Getting back to the original topic of this thread. A lot of companies nowadays just trade on the name, & Snap-On is slowly becoming one of those. As I said earlir, their Blue-Point range have always been re-badged tools made by others, & I do wonder how much of their tools they actually make these days.
    I don't recall ever seeing Craftsman tools in the UK, but I would imagine it's a real disappointment to those who bought Craftsman tools many years ago, & find today's Craftsman tools to be inferior in every way....aka cheaply made tat!


    Cheers.


    Stew.
    Hi Stew - yes, that and there is no other mechanical torque wrench you can adjust/set as that one! We have focused very little on European distribution as we would want to make sure service centers are established which is hard when you're a small(er) company in Chicago haha.

    Back to OP - I think Bahco was a European brand Snap-On bought in the 90's that focused on saw blades, maybe? I wonder if anything has happened to them over time. Does that ring a bell, having been in the European tool biz?

    Also, I remember like 10 years ago seeing "Snap-On" branded products in a Sears Hardware store, which I thought was strange. It wasn't much but it was there...like a flashlight and a tape measure or something.

    I know several years ago a major tool brand had a goal of something like 20% of their sales were to be from "new products." So I took that to believe that they are churning out "new" stuff just to keep it "new" without necessarily making it "better." I think a lot of those good old brands were started by "engineers" of sorts that had a passion for tools, working with their hands, etc. whereas nowadays a lot of those big companies are run by "businessmen" with MBA's that don't have any particular interest in what it is they are selling. (Nothing against businessmen with MBA's) But I suppose that's one of the risks of dealing with large "faceless" companies. I don't know how big Frank Mari's business is but something tells me he personally makes some portion of the products he sells...like he himself runs the machines...the very machines his products would be used on...so he knows what flies and what doesn't. The smaller tool companies tend to be like that.


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