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Thread: Crescent Pliers

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Channel locks vs. Knipex

    "...how come when I enquire about a famous US quality brand the majority of posts back German made Knipex?"

    Having pinched my hands* numerous times with Channel locks, once you use a Knipex, with its superior no-pinch design, you'll want to put the Channel locks on reserve duty.

    Both brands are nicely made, but the pinch free design is what cinches it for me.

    *the Knipex design has a stop that prevents the handles from coming together. The Channel locks allow the handles to come together on any size larger than the smallest, and you can pinch flesh between the handles. Ouch! Careful use can prevent this from happening, but I still prefer better tools than those that can bite me even if I use it "correctly".

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    Most of the single tools are still made here and are good quality, but the socket/combination blowmold cased tool kits are from China. Quality level of the Chinese made tools seems on par or better than Craftsman. The "Cresent" wrench included in the kit is also from China.

    http://www.cooperhandtools.com/brand...cent/index.cfm

    http://www.coopertools.com/

  3. #23
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    I always thought that water pump pliers were the design that had scalloped indentations for the pivot pin to rest in and were guaranteed to slip at the wrong moment. Proto was one company that made them and I have one in my tool box that will never, ever get used if I am still of sound mind.

    Channel locks, or groove joint pliers have the slots that securely hold the two jaws in position and allow you to pinch yourself if not handled carefully.

    Now, you can all tell me the I am wrong and it can just be chalked up to nomenclature that was picked up when I was young and impressionable. Not like now, when I am old and set in my ways.

  4. #24
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    Dave - I understood that water pump pliers were any pliers with the offset or angle design. Channel locks were just an improved slip joint design. I am still looking for "gas burner" pliers that used to be made by Utica. Strong box joint pliers.

  5. #25
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    Nobody seems to have mentioned "Rottenburger" which are the best pump pliers I have seen to date. They are German I think.

    CD.

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    Default Why the Plierwrench?

    I don't want to hijack, but the Eifel pliers have been mentioned twice -What makes them desirable? I have been watching a couple on E-bay since their mention.

    I too, will say that I am a Knipex convert. Years ago, I watched a co-worker cut expanded metal with side cutters (dikes). I came back later with my Channel Lock brand and could not even put a dent in it. I have since bought a large set of their snap ring pliers, several dikes,needle nose, and probably have about a dozen of their pump pliers. If there is a plier that I need, I look to see if they have it in there line-up. Absolutely no comparison between them and Channel Lock.

    Luke

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    Luke -- In my opinion the Eifel Plierwrench is an interesting and cool curiousity, but not a particularly useful plier in the class (pump pliers) we're talking about. The advantage of these is the parallel jaw action. Personally, I find them hard to quickly adjust. I'd guess that most owners consider them more of a collectible than a daily use tool.

  8. #28
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  9. #29
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    ( Can't help with pliers, but about the Bahco adjustable open-end wrench.... No.
    They often take / receive credit for this, but it isn't entirely true. The design and product was around for decades previous. I hava an article about it, by a historian who collects them. Bahco just did a much bigger and better job of it. )

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbc58 View Post
    Dave - I understood that water pump pliers were any pliers with the offset or angle design. Channel locks were just an improved slip joint design. I am still looking for "gas burner" pliers that used to be made by Utica. Strong box joint pliers.
    Don't know if there's a translation problem

    Is this what you call gas pliers?

    http://www.insulatedtoolsshop.co.uk/..._Pliers_2.html

    If so these are a good brit brand, without the plastic handle, as it says NOS and limited stock, AFAIK no longer made by Elliot Lucas.

    http://www.knighton-tools.co.uk/acat...ss_Pliers.html

  11. #31
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    Cool plyers

    I bought a pair of Knipex to try. They are GOOD, and what if I did. Mori Seiki is concereded a great machine and we buy them if we can. I thought quality was a big issue here, NOT BUYING cheap China junk!!!!!!!!!
    I have all the others and double of most (home and work). If I want to try something like this I will, we need to make something to match up.
    We are buying machines from overseas as long a the quality is there, why give a guy a bunch of Crap just for a pair of plyers......
    not fair.
    ben

  12. #32
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    Water pump pliers - for tightening shaft packing glands on water pumps !

    Jim C.

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    Default

    The last several pairs new of Crescent-branded, groove-jointed, waterpump pliers I've seen were made in China, and I'm pretty sure that there was a generation before that made in Taiwan. For my money, the de-facto standard groove-joint waterpump pliers are made by Channellock.

    The competitive European pliers -- Knipex, Bahco, and several other brands -- are box-jointed slip-joint pliers, and from what I can tell they're as tough as the genuine Channellock groove-joint pump pliers.

  14. #34
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    Dunno about the 'prop wash' or 'relative bearing grease', but there really is a 'metric crescent wrench'......the Swedish 'Bahco' make.

    Actually, the old ones were good steel, the best 'shifting' or 'adjustable' wrench, a bit stronger than the Crescent make.....but....the 'knurl' part which is turned to open or close the jaw is 'left-handed'....it operates in the opposite direction from the American Crescent and crescent-type wrenches.

    cheers

    Carla

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    Default Water Pumps

    Quote Originally Posted by j.carlson View Post
    Water pump pliers - for tightening shaft packing glands on water pumps !

    Jim C.
    The water pumps of early automobiles had packing glands and lasted just about the life of the car, requiring only periodic maintenance. Sometime after WWII, I think, they went to a design that requires replacement every 70,000 miles. Progress?

    Years ago, I was showing off a brand-new pair of 24" Channellocks to my younger brother. He pointed out that I did not then have any particular use for such a huge tool, and suggested that it had been a waste of money to buy them. Within a day of him saying that, we were using them on a home plumbing repair. I only kidded him a little bit about his earlier comment.

    You really need three sizes, a 24", the usual 12" and the mini 6" or 8", I forget the exact size.


    John Ruth

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    Not having good luck with the Crescent pliers of any type. The coating on the handles wears away very quickly when jostled around in the tool bag or box. You don't even need to use them before the coating will begin to break and wear away.

    I have replaced all of my pliers ( 1 yr. ago) with the Channel Lock brand and I am not having any problems, and carry the same tool bag.

  17. #37
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    I don't know about US wide but the Cooper tool Manufactor around here has moved to Mexico. 200 people laid off. So i personally can not say cresent is still made in US.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Don't know if there's a translation problem

    Is this what you call gas pliers?

    http://www.insulatedtoolsshop.co.uk/..._Pliers_2.html

    If so these are a good brit brand, without the plastic handle, as it says NOS and limited stock, AFAIK no longer made by Elliot Lucas.

    http://www.knighton-tools.co.uk/acat...ss_Pliers.html
    Yes, those are the pliers. Not exact but close enough. Thanks for the link!

  19. #39
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    Those pliers were made in Sumter SC about 5 years ago. Was in that plant. Neat place.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbc58 View Post
    Most of the single tools are still made here and are good quality, but the socket/combination blowmold cased tool kits are from China. Quality level of the Chinese made tools seems on par or better than Craftsman. The "Cresent" wrench included in the kit is also from China.

    http://www.cooperhandtools.com/brand...cent/index.cfm

    http://www.coopertools.com/
    That is no big surprise as many of the craftsman brand tools are now made in china also...


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