Curiosity - anyone seen a home brew solution for a CNC saw stop system?
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Guinea-Bissau, West Africa
    Posts
    746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    133

    Default Curiosity - anyone seen a home brew solution for a CNC saw stop system?

    I donít have time to do anything about this right now, but curiosity got to me as I was looking at my saw the other day. Iíve seen some really nice looking commercial setups (TigerStop, maybe) for CNC cutting stops for chop saws, band saws, and the like. The one I saw could program multiple cuts, and then each ďgoĒ button press would cycle the stop to the next length Ė pretty slick. The prices were pretty impressive too! Easily justifiable for a commercial shop, Iím sure, but for my little non-profit school kind of breath taking.

    The functionality there isnít all that complicated. Iím wondering if anyone has seen a homebrew solution on an Arduino or R.Pi or something like that? It wouldnít even need to be that accurate (in terms of normal CNC accuracy in the thousandths, I mean) to be very useful. Has anyone rolled their own?

    At the very least, I want to get a movable, lockable stop that at least reads on an embedded tape, like the fence on a table saw, but the computerized idea would be pretty cool!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    It would need to be accurate to a few thousandths if you intend the positioned to return to the same place so that you can cut another batch of the same part.

    Tigerstop guarantees .010", which in my humble opinion leaves something to be desired for repeat positioning. For a home shop you're probably better off to simply add a DRO and position the stop yourself.

    Mind you, what may not be apparent is that if you want reliable results the saw itself must be very sturdy and must be capable of holding position, it must carry a sharp blade full kerf and have large, accruate blade stiffeners to keep. If not, than the accuracy of the position is not all that meaningful.

    This saw is typically a few thousand USD to 10k+

    Furthermore the positioner must be mounted in a fashion in which the distance between the saw and the stop remains hard fixed. I built an outfeed table which is bolted to the floor and stiff, the saw is bolted to the floor as well.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Guinea-Bissau, West Africa
    Posts
    746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BHolcombe View Post
    It would need to be accurate to a few thousandths if you intend the positioned to return to the same place so that you can cut another batch of the same part.

    Tigerstop guarantees .010", which in my humble opinion leaves something to be desired for repeat positioning. For a home shop you're probably better off to simply add a DRO and position the stop yourself.

    Mind you, what may not be apparent is that if you want reliable results the saw itself must be very sturdy and must be capable of holding position, it must carry a sharp blade full kerf and have large, accruate blade stiffeners to keep. If not, than the accuracy of the position is not all that meaningful.

    This saw is typically a few thousand USD to 10k+

    Furthermore the positioner must be mounted in a fashion in which the distance between the saw and the stop remains hard fixed. I built an outfeed table which is bolted to the floor and stiff, the saw is bolted to the floor as well.
    Thanks for your thoughts. Yeah, my Wells saw already includes bolt holes on the back that can be used to attach my infeed roller stand, so if the stop were attached to the roller stand, you'd have a rigid assembly attached to the saw.

    Obviously the stop system can't make a saw more accurate than the saw already was, but it would be at least as repeatable as scribing the cut line on the stock and lining that up behind the blade, which is the alternative for most people.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    3,973
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1794

    Default

    If you are not fixated on cnc, this would be pretty easy to do in other ways. The Warner and Swasey AC and AB line used contacts and relays, and they were good for a thousandth or less. Instead of entering numbers you moved trip dogs. Wasn't very difficult

    I can imagine doing this with air or hydraulics or even mechanically, but you have to decide how to move the stock first. Then the method to control the motion will present itself.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    4,650
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1205
    Likes (Received)
    1089

    Default

    One of the guys here did a pretty good one IIRC. I want to say it was jim rozen? Try a search. I don't remember if it was just a stop positioner or if it actually unclamped, advanced and reclamped the stock.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,705
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    136
    Likes (Received)
    928

    Default

    Get a better scale and learn how to read it. Wood moves as it is cut and the operator can only push so hard to try to keep material against a stop or fence. I had a Whirlwind chopper with a Tiger fence. Two years later it was gone.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Chop saws are used for more than woodwork. I have an Omga and I believe they, along with most other industrial brands are geared toward sawing aluminum extrusions to length. That said, wood does not change in length and if it is moving as described than the preparation is suspect and should be evaluated.

    By the time wood is on the chop saw in my shop it has adjusted to the shop humidity, has been jointed, square edged and thickness planed. Hand pressure is enough to clamp it.

    Iím lost as to what learning to read a scale has to do with the post, no different than adding a DRO or CNC capacity to any other machine. Accuracy is often the fastest path.

    Whatever is being cut the steps taken to prep the saw are the same, the cut must be precisely square and the stop must be compared to measurement standards. I find this simple enough. I square the saw then compare measurements to what my longest calipers read.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •