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    Question Cut out oblong

    Hello. I have a (approximately) 2.2” round bar in 4340 steel, which I need to cut out to a oblong shape. Which tools should I use for this job? The picture below describe what I’m trying to achieve.


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    You taking the piss?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    You taking the piss?

    This is the guy named Drill Department who needed help with drilling previously.

    From what I recall, he's not working with industrial equipment, or if he is, he doesn't know how to use it. What tolerance on the size and flatness? It COULD be done with a decent belt sander and a scrap angle plate. Or it could be done on a mill. Or it could be done on a live tooled late. Or it could be done with a table saw (not well, but it could be done). Given enough time, it could be accomplished by scraping. You could do it on a surface grinder. You could do it with an angle grinder. You could do it in a box. You could do it with a fox. You could do it here, or there. You could do it anywhere.


    So, Drill Dept, help me help you. What machinery do you have available to do this?

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    A shaper or horizontal mill would be the classic way to go. Will any of it remain full round or is it oval all the way?
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    This is the guy named Drill Department who needed help with drilling previously.

    From what I recall, he's not working with industrial equipment, or if he is, he doesn't know how to use it. What tolerance on the size and flatness? It COULD be done with a decent belt sander and a scrap angle plate. Or it could be done on a mill. Or it could be done on a live tooled late. Or it could be done with a table saw (not well, but it could be done). Given enough time, it could be accomplished by scraping. You could do it on a surface grinder. You could do it with an angle grinder. You could do it in a box. You could do it with a fox. You could do it here, or there. You could do it anywhere.


    So, Drill Dept, help me help you. What machinery do you have available to do this?
    Well, I only have a drill press, a dremel and hand tools. I wounder if this could be done with accuracy by using a drill press and drilling multiple holes like a straight line and finish it off using a hacksaw? I imagine that it will lack accuracy and that I will have a hard time getting rid of the excess material between each hole? 4340 isn’t as hard as stainless to machine, but it’s still hard.

    I need to be able to make straight cuts. What’s the best solution for this without using expensive tools?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drilldept View Post
    Well, I only have a drill press, a dremel and hand tools. I wounder if this could be done with accuracy by using a drill press and drilling multiple holes like a straight line and finish it off using a hacksaw? I imagine that it will lack accuracy and that I will have a hard time getting rid of the excess material between each hole? 4340 isn’t as hard as stainless to machine, but it’s still hard.

    I need to be able to make straight cuts. What’s the best solution for this without using expensive tools?
    Home Page - Projects and Articles on Our Forum! | The Hobby-Machinist is the place for YoÜ.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drilldept View Post
    I need to be able to make straight cuts. What’s the best solution for this without using expensive tools?
    Place material in cardboard box, carry it down the street to a machine shop....hand to an experienced machinist...job done.
    Don't forget your wallet.
    Cheers Ross

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    A shaper or horizontal mill would be the classic way to go. Will any of it remain full round or is it oval all the way?
    Bill D
    It’s oval all the way, like in the picture. I need to get rid of 14.1mm on both sides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drilldept View Post
    Well, I only have a drill press, a dremel and hand tools. I wounder if this could be done with accuracy by using a drill press and drilling multiple holes like a straight line and finish it off using a hacksaw? I imagine that it will lack accuracy and that I will have a hard time getting rid of the excess material between each hole? 4340 isn’t as hard as stainless to machine, but it’s still hard.

    I need to be able to make straight cuts. What’s the best solution for this without using expensive tools?
    A hacksaw and a file. I'm not kidding. You will work up a sweat and probably go through several blades but it can be done.

    Make layout lines.
    Cut OUTSIDE of the lines using a coarse tooth blade in a GOOD hacksaw frame.
    Start filing with a coarse file, taking care not to get too close to the lines.
    Finish with a fine file and then sandpaper wrapped around something truly flat.

    And use a good cutting oil while sawing.

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    Seriously guys,

    I'm as willing as anyone else to help a newbie but I think a moderator needs to set this individual straight about pushing the limits of a MACHINING forum. These posts aren't just amateur they are almost pushing the limits of a hobby forum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Seriously guys,

    I'm as willing as anyone else to help a newbie but I think a moderator needs to set this individual straight about pushing the limits of a MACHINING forum. These posts aren't just amateur they are almost pushing the limits of a hobby forum.
    Ooh....your a bad man....
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    It's a variation on the old joke about a hobo asking a nice lady if she could do some mending for him.

    She asks what mending he needs.

    Holding up a button he asks, Can you sew a new coat to this button?

    Everyone has been really good about sketching out almost all the ways he could accomplish it with the equipment he's got. I guess nobody suggested a cold chisel and file, but that's one more option. Keyways were sometimes actually made with a cape chisel and files. Taking it to someone who has the equipment has to be the best suggestion. Other methods could work but I'd be absolutely flabbergasted if THIS guy actually accomplished any of them. If he does, I hope he'll come back and describe his experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    It's a variation on the old joke about a hobo asking a nice lady if she could do some mending for him.

    She asks what mending he needs.

    Holding up a button he asks, Can you sew a new coat to this button?

    Everyone has been really good about sketching out almost all the ways he could accomplish it with the equipment he's got. I guess nobody suggested a cold chisel and file, but that's one more option. Keyways were sometimes actually made with a cape chisel and files. Taking it to someone who has the equipment has to be the best suggestion. Other methods could work but I'd be absolutely flabbergasted if THIS guy actually accomplished any of them. If he does, I hope he'll come back and describe his experience.

    Hard to type with 7 fingers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drilldept View Post
    I wounder if this could be done with accuracy
    Sure can, you'll be accurate within 1/8" at best.


    Quote Originally Posted by Drilldept View Post
    What’s the best solution for this without using expensive tools?
    You have 3 solutions.
    1) hacksaw and file.
    2) have a REAL machine shop do it for you
    3) find another hobby

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    Go real old school: rough it out with cold chisels and finish by filing. Textbooks from the late 19th and early 20th century are available on the internet as PDF or Epub files. They usually cover chisel techniques.

    Since your tooling is limited, do you even have the tools to lay out the cut lines or make accurate measurements?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinoyance View Post
    Since your tooling is limited, do you even have the tools to lay out the cut lines or make accurate measurements?
    Well, he has these really nice calipers from Harbor Freight.

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    Bust out the angle grinder.

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    Clamp a low buck import one or two axis table on the drill press and put an endmill or face mill in the drill chuck.
    Bob

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    Grab it in vise grips. Drive about 25mph on a paved road, concrete if possible. lean out door and apply work to the ground with firm pressure Check for fit every 200 feet or so. Be careful to make full even contact so the ends do not get overdone.
    Could this be shaved down on a gun range with enough accuracy?
    Bil lD.

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    Another take. Find an end mill that fits in your drill press. Mill until drill press fails. Get another drill press. Lather, rinse, repeat.

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