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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by entasis View Post
    I have a dimensional stone business, 6" is thin for us, Milland is sort of right, hey he's a granite stater - we sometimes use a worm drive saw with water feed & GFCI to cut stone on site - a decent quality turbo diamond blade and water will cut as deep as saw cutting depth will allow, but should be done in steps - then flip the plate and repeat - also the stone can be broken off if you cut 1/3 of the way through, put the cut on a raised straight edge and wack and end with a 3 lb hammer, using a block of wood to save stone from the blow of the hammer - the deeper the cut the cleaner the break, but in any case will break unevenly if snapped - DO NOT FORGET TO USE A GROUND FAULT INTERUPTER
    Skill and Makita worm drives are sold with water feed adapters just for cutting stone. They work and many stone shops have one because sometimes it is needed, gets them out of a jam. Cut from each side in steps with a straight edge if doing 6 inch. I have a 4" circular saw, Alpha. I have cut small bits of granite 3CM in a single pass using a garden sprayer set up to water feed it.
    You could also rent a ring saw and have at it from one side. I cut a big opening in a 10 inch thick concrete foundation with one. Rent not so bad and they will measure thickness of diamond rim before and after when returned.

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    Good enough diamond blades can be purchased on line for very small money I've got a selection for my Felker wet saw.

    Fitted to a $60 double insulated Makita circular saw, (they come in an attractive blue fitted case) Make two cuts while playing water in the kerf with a garden hose. (not too much!)

    First cut 3/4 inch deep on the bottom , then flip the stone and cut 2 inches or so deep directly opposite on the good side. use a fence if you want the cut straight.

    Drive as many wooden shims as you can into the 2 inch kerf. Shims are sold in packs at the building supply where you bought the circular saw.

    The shims don't need to be over driven, just "goot-en-tite". Pair them up if the kerf ends up too wide for one. Cut the thin parts off the shims to get a good fit in the kerf.

    With the kerf well populated with hammered in wooden shims, PUT THE GARDEN HOSE BACK ON THE STONE. let the water swell the wooden shims. You will know when the effort has paid off ;-)

    In the good old days, water ice would have done the same job in winter.

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    Richard,
    We met a few years back, when you were first moving into the old shoe factory building.

    Home Depot Rental has 14” and 16” hand held gas/diamond blade concrete cutting saws...4 hour minimum rental.
    You probably have less than 30 minutes of cutting to halve that…with a gas saw.

    We can talk technique more when you choose the type of equipment to use.

    In the late 1980's I developed the first hydraulic concrete cutting chain saw from a prototype bar and chain supplied by Oregon Chain. These are available, but not at all necessary for this type of cut.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Any suggestions for a guy on a low budget?
    Surely. Don't let hunger blind you to hassle.

    Go and find a plate that needs NO cutting, nor the associated labour, time diverted, risk, nor rigging you are not equipped to manage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Surely. Don't let hunger blind you to hassle.

    Go and find a plate that needs NO cutting, nor the associated labour, time diverted, risk, nor rigging you are not equipped to manage.
    This is good advice.

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    How about the ancient Egyptian method. Drill holes in block, pound in dry wooden wedges, soak with water, wait. Rather than hand drilling I would suggest a mag base drill, a piece of steel plate and a few CMUs for ballast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mnl View Post
    How about the ancient Egyptian method. Drill holes in block, pound in dry wooden wedges, soak with water, wait. Rather than hand drilling I would suggest a mag base drill, a piece of steel plate and a few CMUs for ballast.
    Too much like work, drilling with Bronze hand tools.

    The Ancient Egyptians actually used abrasive sawing techniques on stone when they were up to fine work. Rougher work, they simply split the stone on a scored or chiselled line.

    Much as is still done today where stoneworks have a frame with hydraulic power to press a "dotted line" of wedge-tips to make "flagstone" to marketable sizes or to order.

    Quick, slick, low waste.

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    Screw that

    call a tow truck buy some straps jimmy it up and hook it

    1200 or 2500 pounds you are not moving either very easily so why bother with the noise?

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    Screw that

    call a tow truck buy some straps jimmy it up and hook it

    1200 or 2500 pounds you are not moving either very easily so why bother with the noise?
    There is that. My 30" X 48" Herman were a four-ledge "grade A" nearly twice as thick as this one. Still came in just under 1200 Avoir off liftgate & pallet-jack delivery, ex "Small Tools" up in Ohio.

    They ship LOTS of plates, so have a method that puts them face-down on layers of pasteboard atop a double-pallet stack. Factory table then strapped atop.

    I righted it outdoors with straps off a rented FL, my 2-Ton engine hoist not what I'd trust for that sort of task w/r lateral stability.

    Once dog-paddled indoors on machinery skates, I lifted it with straps off a pair of beam trolleys so as to get the Iron-wheeled table back under it, roll it away on its own resources thereafter. A 30" width rather than 36' lets it clear the 36" firedoors between chip-side of the shop & clean-side storage/layout space.

    It isn't all that hard.

    One just has to be extra careful.... and uncommonly patient.

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    Approaching a granite counter guy is not such a ridiculous idea. When I did the counters in my house I had the opportunity to go to his fab yard where he cuts slabs. He had a large CNC saw with a table that was probably 20' long and 15' wide with a large diameter diamond saw and cooling water. The guy you find on Craigslist probably does not have this set up but they are out there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Surely. Don't let hunger blind you to hassle.

    Go and find a plate that needs NO cutting, nor the associated labour, time diverted, risk, nor rigging you are not equipped to manage.
    Yes, that is good advice Bill. And welcome back, missed you. I've been looking for some time for a local 3' x 4' without any luck.

    But, I have to admit I kinda like the challenge of dealing with this big rock. I'm pretty sure I can get it for $200, and it's only a few miles away. I have a friend who, like me, enjoys moving heavy machines and stuff, it would be a fun afternoon for us. And if we cut it, the pieces will fit in my old Chevy van. No truck, wrecker or loader rental charges. Levers, blocking, come alongs, engine and chain hoist, pallet jack. Just got a used 110v winch to pull shit out of the van onto the dock. What could go wrong????

    What could go wrong?

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    I've been looking for some time for a local 3' x 4' without any luck.
    "Local" is relative. Trucks roll every hour of every day. If my larder has foodstuffs from Canada, Denmark, Thailand, Egypt, Turkey, China, Chile, Peru, Mexico, Scotland, England... yadda, yadda - even the Soviet Socialist Republik of Kalifornicyah - carcinogens and all?

    A surface plate from two states away is not a big deal.

    Exact figures are in a file somewhere, here, but for now, my memory is the Small Tools price for my Herman 30" x 48" was under $400.

    They then shipped it for HALF the cost I expected. Seems they ship often enough to get far better rates than we once-every-five years folks!

    The vertical corners of my plate had seem some battering and chipping. The working top, OTOH, is like NEW. Nary a chip. NO transfer-media stains. The annual certifications had even been kept-up 'til fairly recently.

    Given that a SP is the very "bedrock" off which one bases "accurate stuff" for the whole rest of the shop?

    There be a TON of ways one can save a sheckel or have "fun" dealing with interesting challenges by "field expedient" means.

    Metrology goods should seldom be among those.

    PS: On those "Field expedients. My usual handyman/contractor was about to haul some dead-lovely straight lengths of marble kitchen counter vertical backstop off to the landfill. They were kidnapped and enslaved for odd portable SE use right here instead! Cost-benefit thingie...

    But y'see... I already have that big Grade A maybe-still-or-near-as-dammit Herman SP to vet them against and keep only those with merit.

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    Agreed on all points, BUT...

    This is hardly for real metrology use, have an 18 x 24 pink Starrett for that. I just want to assemble a cnc roouter for woodworking use and get it flat & true within .005". Probably way better than most of the commercial routers out there. .005" on wood is just a sloppy, wet kiss, stuff moves around constantly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Agreed on all points, BUT...

    This is hardly for real metrology use, have an 18 x 24 pink Starrett for that. I just want to assemble a cnc roouter for woodworking use and get it flat & true within .005". Probably way better than most of the commercial routers out there. .005" on wood is just a sloppy, wet kiss, stuff moves around constantly.
    ?? You don't actually need a "static" monolith for that. More dead-weight than useful.

    All you need is a stout frame you can eyeball/laser align, locked to three stable anchors. Check and/or adjust now and then.

    WTH - it could be fold-up portable and still do good work when set-up for it.

    Opposite end of the spectrum, it could be reinforced concrete, "cast" in-place. As used for heavy machine-tool pads - or more relevant, even kitchen countertops atop steel framing, certain venues.

    That said, precision Granite metrology-system BENCH tops are out there, used, just as SP are.

    Many include a cabinet/base. Most have holes here and there, but they go cheap because they are not as "general Purpose" useful as an SP of comparable size.

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    Thats what this is, top from some sort of machine, holes, base & all. Been sitting outside for a while, hardly pristine. Is $200 too high for this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Thats what this is, top from some sort of machine, holes, base & all. Been sitting outside for a while, hardly pristine. Is $200 too high for this?
    "Paid to haul it way" can be too high if it is going to take up space, divert time from worthier pursuits, ultimately impair peace and goodwill, whether under your roof.... or just under your hat.

    DAMHIKT! or that I am not alone in coming to that sort of world-view.. albeit "late"!

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Yes, that is good advice Bill. And welcome back, missed you. I've been looking for some time for a local 3' x 4' without any luck.

    But, I have to admit I kinda like the challenge of dealing with this big rock. I'm pretty sure I can get it for $200, and it's only a few miles away. I have a friend who, like me, enjoys moving heavy machines and stuff, it would be a fun afternoon for us. And if we cut it, the pieces will fit in my old Chevy van. No truck, wrecker or loader rental charges. Levers, blocking, come alongs, engine and chain hoist, pallet jack. Just got a used 110v winch to pull shit out of the van onto the dock. What could go wrong????

    What could go wrong?
    You and I have very different ideas on a "fun afternoon". If the seller had a forklift to load it, $200 would be a fair price, but otherwise it just sounds like you are doing him a favor and paying for it. I'd be throwing out some high numbers on what a forklift rental will cost and bargaining the number down. Have you called a tow truck? I'd bet $50 to $100 would get that loaded on a trailer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Have you called a tow truck? I'd bet $50 to $100 would get that loaded on a trailer.
    Still wants some effort to get it properly rigged for a hook, but yes. Saves a ton of billable time.

    Also a trivial load, so a trailer or open-bed pickup is optional. The boom on a typical wrecker can hang it far enough out to "insert" it at least part-way into a closed van. Grillage and skill do the rest.

    That sorted, it is FAR easier to UNload it by legacy Country Boy means (ramp, skids, etc...) at the delivery end - where gravity is working for you rather than against.

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    There was a couple of thread about this in the past. Here is one. I see there are a few You Tube shows too...
    Cutting a granite surface plate into straight edges

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Still wants some effort to get it properly rigged for a hook, but yes. Saves a ton of billable time.

    Also a trivial load, so a trailer or open-bed pickup is optional. The boom on a typical wrecker can hang it far enough out to "insert" it at least part-way into a closed van. Grillage and skill do the rest.

    That sorted, it is FAR easier to UNload it by legacy Country Boy means (ramp, skids, etc...) at the delivery end - where gravity is working for you rather than against.
    55" x 65" doesn't fit in a van, too wide, or too high if standing up(frightening!)

    Best thing would surely be to find a 3' x 4' x 4" granite plate, but this is out there waiting...


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