cutting oil viscosity info needed
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  1. #1
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    Default cutting oil viscosity info needed

    Going to swap to cutting oil instead of coolant in a lathe but can't seem to come up with viscosity ratings of all the different cutting oils.

    With other oils(spindle oil, ex) its easy to find the info but Im not seeing it with cutting oils.

    Is viscosity just not a major factor with it? They all close to the same?

    Thanks for your time.

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    I never saw a lot of viscosity difference in the common oils. The ones with "active" sulfur will work with your heavier tougher stainless and alloys, but will stain brass and make plating of brass difficult or impossible. Some of the non-staining oils suitable for brass can do double duty facilitating cutting as well as lubing roller spindle bearings.
    Worked in a screw machine shop where the owner had New Britains, cutting oil was used for spindle lube there. The oil he had used in California was no longer available so he found Mobilmet 303 locally and used it in all 3 machines. All his work was stainless, some 303 mostly 304 and some 347. Everything worked well. 303 became Omnicron which I have used, went to Mobilmet Nu as it was heavier duty and yet still non-staining. Nu has become 427, there is a family of the 42X oils for different difficulties of work and I assume another family of "active" sulfur oils.
    I think you need to match your requirements and not worry about viscosity.

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    Left you a PM.

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    They very much can vary in viscosity. I have, for example Blaser Vascomill CSF10 and CSF22 in some of our machines. The CSF10 is much lower viscosity, and is used in machines that do gun drilling (think .8mm x 6") and the CSF22 is used for general machining. I'd imagine if you talk to your coolant supplier, they should be able to quantify these things for you.

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    Mobil has data sheets for all the Mobilmet cutting oils on line- same for Chevron.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
    Left you a PM.
    A come on now....spill it !....

    Others might like to know too.

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    Most of the cutting oils that I have run across seem to be similar, but did notice that cutting oil used in aerosol cans seems to be thinner.

    JH

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    Thanks for the info from everyone. I completely forgot about the section 9 on msds sheets giving the physical properties which include the viscosity ratings.


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