Deburr internal passageways on manifold
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  1. #1
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    Default Deburr internal passageways on manifold

    I'm working on some hydraulic manifolds with lots of intersecting internal passageways. Some of those are pretty deep in the part and I'm really struggling on how best to deburr them. Currently I'm trying to get in there with a small burr on a dotco, which is very difficult and easy to muck up. Does anyone have any good ways to do this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaguar36 View Post
    I'm working on some hydraulic manifolds with lots of intersecting internal passageways.
    Know anyone with an Extrudehone ?

    If not, maybe you could make a feeble one without too much trouble.

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    Interesting, I've not heard of that but I had been kicking around the idea of just dumping some grit into some oil and just pumping it through. Didn't have a good idea on how to keep the grit suspended and also not just destroy the pump. The putty the Extrudehone uses seems like it would solve the first issue.

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    Look up a process called thermal deburring. I don't know if it would work on an aluminum part. I made steel and ductile iron hydraulic valve bodies that were sent through the thermal deburring process. The process also removed flash rust.

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    Would you be able to “sandblast” the parts with dried ice, walnut, or other media? I’m thinking something other than oxide grit, unless you can flush out the passageways.

    Another alternative would be a vibratory tumbler with any one of several medias.

    I’ve had good results with both of these processes, but also haven’t done something quite as precise as what you’re describing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaguar36 View Post
    I had been kicking around the idea of just dumping some grit into some oil and just pumping it through. Didn't have a good idea on how to keep the grit suspended and also not just destroy the pump.
    I think extrudehones use two cylinders, one on each side, then push-pull push-pull push-pull the paste. If there's no resistance it doesn't deburr very hard.

    If you have enough parts to do, seems like you could rig something up like that ?

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    Back in the seventies, we had to clean out some SS radioisotope static mixers with intricate channels. We made up a device using a hydraulic press and another old hydraulic cylinder that had screwed on end caps. We would charge the cylinder by unscrewing the end cap. The abrasive was rock tumbling compound that came in four grades in a kit. We made a "slurry" out of the abrasive and white lithium grease. We used the press to compress the loaded cylinder and force the slurry through the mixer. It worked.

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    As stated above, look at thermal deburring. I know Sol does it Deburring | Gardena CA | Mechanical Metal Finishing but he's clear across the country. He can tell you what to do.

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    A long lolipop cutter and a debur tool path
    Don


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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    Cogsdill make a variety of tools that would make this very simple if the geometry allows:

    Deburring Tools by Cogsdill - Originator of One-Pass Deburring

    Many of those have machinable 'noses' so you can shorten up the front of the tool a little.

    A twisted abrasive brush might also be an option if the passages are large enough to allow them:

    McMaster-Carr

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    How about a twisted wire deburring brush? basically just chuck it up in a battery drill or in-situ on the machine and run it down the hole.


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