die grinder technique - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Using the least shank hang out sometimes can help along with slower RPM. Also abrasive burrs dressed to size with a dressing stick.

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    I rarely reference videos but a recent one showed Keith Rucker cutting oil grooves in the bed of the planer he is restoring. He used a die grinder. I learned a lot by watching. BTW that planer resto series is worth watching IMO.

    metalmagpie

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  4. #23
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    On the rare () occasion where I need to slot a hole out I often find it's often just as fast to use a sharp
    round file to do the job. A good file will remove a lot of material in a relatively short period of time. Files are
    a forgotten tool in many shops but they do have their place. I rarely if ever use a die grinder; I find them to
    be a very obnoxious tool...

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    The problem with a hand file is its length and the fact that the tool has to travel in a linear direction.....the far side of the file often hits something you don't want it to. I like using a file but only probably 20% of the applications allow it.

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    The technique for cutting things like oil grooves or radiusing an oil port or deburring an internal feature is COMPLETELY different from ovaling a hole to align it with another hole or fastener!

    Variable speed tools and LOW LOW speed is the key to that. Absolutely double cut. Actually, the roto zip burrs are made for this sidecutting job, I’ll have to think about it next time I do it, but I’m inclined to say “never climb”. And hold on tight!

    Oh, and if it does catch, take the internal tooth off the workpiece with that round file if you can, and get back on it.

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    Speaking of die grinders...after 20+ years my well-beat Makita grinder gave it up. So...while they still sell it, I 'upgraded' to the fancy, bigger version that has variable speed.

    My review? The variable speed is nice but the bigger size makes it clumsy. And the biggest offense is the lack of a lock for the already cumbersome paddle switch. You spend more time trying to keep the tool on than you spend grinding.makita-1.jpgmakita-2.jpg

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    Didn't know they made a paddle switch version, I'm no fan of those. the adjustable speed Makitas I've seen have,(as does mine) the sliding side switch.

    advice to anyone buying, get the vari-speed! if you have a single speed electric die grinder, ditch it NOW, and do yourself a favor, get a vari-speed!

    If I need dainty, I'll use the flex-shaft or the air powered dental handpiece.

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    I have a die grinder with a long neck and I find it the easiest to use, one hand on the body and one hand on the neck. I still get some jumping using a ball burr , the long neck gives me more control. I'll have to go look at Keith's video, I am very familiar with the New Haven planer he has and he's done an excellent job on the restoration so far, knowing what he started with. His videos are worth the time.
    Ben

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Yeah. The worst - when you need to stick a carbide burr into a bore with not much clearance, and the burr catches, and bounces around in the bore. If it is a 6" carbide burr, that can bend or break, all the worse.

    For those and many other situations, I prefer electric die grinders with router speed controls. A friend who ports cylinder heads introduced me to it 25 years ago and it was a game changer.

    It allows low rpm, excellent torque, and great feel. I can really bear down against the burr and workpiece. That creates stability and cutter support that I can't get with just my hands. I can feel the cutter tracing along the radius I am cutting, and I can feel the texture of the finish. Nevermind that carbide wants to be run fast - it works just fine at low rpm.

    The lower speed is also crtical for abrasives - flap rolls, tootsie rolls, etc.

    High RPM burrs have their place, but it is a very different technique.
    What he said.

    Milwaukee die grinders of different sizes. A comfortable chair and bench at the correct height so you can rest the tail of the grinder on your shoulder. If the burr orbits the hole, its running to fast.

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    Die grinders along with hacksaws and hand drills are in a group of Ouija tools, the more you try to control them the more the more act on their own

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    What was said over the page. A little finger under the trigger, can make all the difference for speed control on an air grinder and Glug's suggestion of an electric die grinder is good.

    Most of the mold and die shops that used to exist here, ran electric Suhner flex shaft machines, so you were just controlling a comfortable size handpiece, rather than wrestling an air hose, an oversize body and and attempting to control speed. The rpm topped out at around 11k rather than 20~25k. The one here is around 3/4hp, with a hefty amount of torque - if you get blase with a 6" long burr, it will get away from you still! A friend who does lots of porting uses one of these sometimes for finish grinding - shop.suhner-abrasive-expert.com quite expensive compared to the usual brands, easy to control and well supported with parts.

  14. #32
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    It has been 10yrs since I was porting cylinder heads, I did it daily working cast iron and aluminum. I tried most major die grinders and settled on Dotco for stones, and Cleco grinders for burrs.
    I had not found a more powerful grinder that will work as well at low speeds, but they scream real loud at high speeds, making them not as smooth as Dotco.
    The Cleco grinders will run on a few pounds of air pressure and run slow with power making the burr like a rotary file, so a regulater right at hand is much better then trying to feather the trigger-almost impossible with the powerful Clecos.
    When doing ports, the long burrs are used, to be more precise, the burr needs to be trued when installed in the Erickson DA 300 collet chuck the Cleco grinders use. If the burr runs out more then .002" it will perform poorly, and tend to grab.
    The Cleco grinders have a steel body with flats that will hold the grinder in a vise. With the grinder held in a vise, a dial indicator placed right on the burr, the burr rotated backwards, when the high spot is found, lightly bend the burr in the direction needed, then tap the shank with your Starrett one eyed hammer until true. Enough of a pain in the ass, that I used seven cleco grinders for the different burr shapes, but I shaped everything first with with a 1/2" ball.
    What I just stated was crazy, don't do any of it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    What I just stated was crazy, don't do any of it!
    Good advice, as usual Donie. Especially the not porting heads part!

    My technique with burrs is to mark the die grinder spindle and try the burr in different positions. When it runs smooth, index the burr shaft with a mark. That helps a lot. Truing guided by a DI would be a further improvement, especially with long shanks.

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    I totally agree with Cyanidekid Those paddle switches suck. Not only are they awkward in the hand but set it down on the bench the wrong way and fucks off into low earth orbit.

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    I have used both 20,000 and 100,000 electric die grinders and air motors for deburring, tuning, etc. and I have to agree with @johnfalco on his technique as it works very well for me. While a firm grip is a prerequisite I also have to agree with @BtoVin83 on his classification of tools in the Ouija tool group...

  20. #36
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    I know this is an old thread, but this burr bouncing problem was happening to me, and I learned the value of quality carbide. In the past when it happened, I'd chip the heck out of the burr, but this time I was using a Grobet double-cut cone and beat the living crap out of it with no chipping. I had to extend a slot into a weld. Just thought I'd pass that on.

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