Dimensions or info on 1/4 NPS swivel ?
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    Default Dimensions or info on 1/4 NPS swivel ?

    The swivel cap is retained by a piece of wire forced into the hole on the nut face. The wire winds around the circumference of the nut. The nut is retained because the
    internal barrel has a cone type looking end. Once the wire is shoved in the hole it probably cannot be removed.

    Trying to ask about the type of wire and dimensions of the swivel connection.

    dsc_1054.jpg

    dsc_1055.jpg

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    Rather than a swivel it looks like an inverse flare fitting to me.

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    Anybody make this kind of swivel/rotating connection. The one here swivels almost like a ball bearing. The inserted wire does not interfere with the rotation.

    The other method is a plated/crimped on head.
    Last edited by rons; 09-16-2020 at 05:03 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    Trying to ask about the type of wire and dimensions of the swivel connection.
    What are you after exactly? manufacturer, the wire used in the nuts or just type for the fitting you have?
    You need to measure the thread and the tapered sealing surface inside the nut to find out the fitting type.

    German DIN 2353 standard "Heavy" fittings are one type of fittings that commonly use the wire locked nut. I have bunch in my fitting assortments.
    25mm DIN Swivel Nut Elbow, 90 Degree, Steel, DIN 2353 Metric, Hydraulic Adapter - HEAVY

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    Maybe something here will help your search.
    McMaster-Carr

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    What are you after exactly? manufacturer, the wire used in the nuts or just type for the fitting you have?
    You need to measure the thread and the tapered sealing surface inside the nut to find out the fitting type.

    German DIN 2353 standard "Heavy" fittings are one type of fittings that commonly use the wire locked nut. I have bunch in my fitting assortments.
    25mm DIN Swivel Nut Elbow, 90 Degree, Steel, DIN 2353 Metric, Hydraulic Adapter - HEAVY
    I want to make another paint gun pressure fitting without the cheap ChiComm steel plated part (the swivel connector attached to paint gun):

    dsc_0592.jpg

    The change would be to make the shinny SS part (with gauge on top) with a swivel connection on the left end where it attaches to the paint gun thread (1/4 NPS).
    The detail on the way the swivel nut is held in place is what I'm looking for. Also, the existing ChiComm part has the country of origin right
    out in plain view. The sucker has to go. It is degrading to use that cheap $1.50 when I could have got a USA part for 20 times the price.

    What happened is that I built a few of these paint gun attachments and the ChiComm parts were all I could locate. The SS swivel in the first picture
    came to me as four samples from someone I knew months later.

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    that is just a compression flare fitting. with a straight thread. measure and find out. or spend the $5 and get one that is already made at a paint supply place or hydraulic shop

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    If you are simply looking for a swiveling joint how about using a just using a QD fitting there?

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I want to make another paint gun pressure fitting without the cheap ChiComm steel plated part (the swivel connector attached to paint gun):

    dsc_0592.jpg

    The change would be to make the shinny SS part (with gauge on top) with a swivel connection on the left end where it attaches to the paint gun thread (1/4 NPS).
    The detail on the way the swivel nut is held in place is what I'm looking for. Also, the existing ChiComm part has the country of origin right
    out in plain view. The sucker has to go. It is degrading to use that cheap $1.50 when I could have got a USA part for 20 times the price.

    What happened is that I built a few of these paint gun attachments and the ChiComm parts were all I could locate. The SS swivel in the first picture
    came to me as four samples from someone I knew months later.
    OK, so you want stainless steel swivel fitting that rotates easily even when tightened so that the hose is not twisting the paint gun?
    Most? hydraulic swivel fittings lock up when tightened, if you want one that rotates easily look for "rotary fitting"

    Parker for example has ball bearing rotary fittings https://ph.parker.com/us/en/ermeto-d...ary-fittings-1

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    The swivel cap is retained by a piece of wire forced into the hole on the nut face. The wire winds around the circumference of the nut. The nut is retained because the
    internal barrel has a cone type looking end. Once the wire is shoved in the hole it probably cannot be removed.

    Trying to ask about the type of wire and dimensions of the swivel connection.

    dsc_1054.jpg

    dsc_1055.jpg
    That fitting is NPT male to NPSM female. The hole is a weep hole, it's there for leak detection. NPT swill seal to NPSM on the conical face. I use these in various applications to prevent twisting the hose, or to make connections between NPT fittings on filter regulators and inline oilers.

    Like Matt says, it will lock in place when tightened down. If you want it to swivel when tight, that's a different fitting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    That fitting is NPT male to NPSM female. The hole is a weep hole, it's there for leak detection. NPT swill seal to NPSM on the conical face. I use these in various applications to prevent twisting the hose, or to make connections between NPT fittings on filter regulators and inline oilers.

    Like Matt says, it will lock in place when tightened down. If you want it to swivel when tight, that's a different fitting.
    It may be for leak detection. But there is a metal pin that was injected through the hole.

    The metal pin has been pushed so that it circles around the inside shaft about 320 degrees.
    The metal pin or rod has a diameter close to the diameter of the entry hole (.095 approx).

    How that can be done with out gouging out the channel it is riding in?
    How that can be done so that the metal pin is exerting pressure on the swivel nut and tracking in a half-grooves in the barrel and back of nut?
    How that can be done to give a sliding fit like a bearing?

    Those are the questions... looks hard to me because you only get one chance when forcing in the wire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    It may be for leak detection. But there is a metal pin that was injected through the hole.

    The metal pin has been pushed so that it circles around the inside shaft about 320 degrees.
    The metal pin or rod has a diameter close to the diameter of the entry hole (.095 approx).

    How that can be done with out gouging out the channel it is riding in?
    How that can be done so that the metal pin is exerting pressure on the swivel nut and tracking in a half-grooves in the barrel and back of nut?
    How that can be done to give a sliding fit like a bearing?

    Those are the questions... looks hard to me because you only get one chance when forcing in the wire.
    It is indeed mainly structural/assembly related hole and maybe secondarily weep hole. If I recall correctly DIN heavy fittings have part of the wire blocking the hole: they don't even leak from the hole but somewhere else.

    And I have wondered those same questions at some point. It's not like the most obvious way to assemble the fitting after all..

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    It is indeed mainly structural/assembly related hole and maybe secondarily weep hole. If I recall correctly DIN heavy fittings have part of the wire blocking the hole: they don't even leak from the hole but somewhere else.

    And I have wondered those same questions at some point. It's not like the most obvious way to assemble the fitting after all..
    I have looked very closely at the lock wire inside the fitting. It is wound around the inside a little more than 3/4 circumference of the shaft.
    There is a half-circle in the shaft that matches a half-circle inside the nut. The wire must be shot into the hole by a machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I have looked very closely at the lock wire inside the fitting. It is wound around the inside a little more than 3/4 circumference of the shaft.
    There is a half-circle in the shaft that matches a half-circle inside the nut. The wire must be shot into the hole by a machine.
    If you look at the Parker catalog, the very high pressure fittings have that hole. It is described as a weep hole, and it's positioned to cover half of the sealing taper. So as the seal begins to leak, it first appears as fluid leaking from the hole to give you notice that that the connection needs serviced.

    I think what you have is a cheap-as-dirt chicom imitation of a real fitting. They retain the nut with the wire because it's not high pressure, and they don't have the equipment to properly swage the assembly. So they shove a wire in there to keep it from falling apart.

    I have a box of those NPT/NPSM fittings in various sizes- none of them have a hole in the nut. They are all swaged.

    It's not a swivel connection- sounds like you want one of these:

    McMaster-Carr

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post

    I think what you have is a cheap-as-dirt chicom imitation of a real fitting. They retain the nut with the wire because it's not high pressure, and they don't have the equipment to properly swage the assembly. So they shove a wire in there to keep it from falling apart.
    More likely European or German origin. All the DIN heavy pipe fittings that I have are assembled with locking wire. Maybe part of the standard.
    Pressure is not a problem: DIN Heavy (S) is rated for up to 800 bar operating pressure. Wire is located such that you would need to shear it to 2 rings. Not going to happen easily.

    10mm DIN heavy 800 bar, similarly sized JIC flare or NPSM swivel is something like 300 bar.

    Weep hole in high pressure (>10k PSI) fittings is a different animal than the wire insertion hole.

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    Somewhat back on OP's problem: What sort of pressure that paint gun operates?
    Airless high pressure paint gun? something like 3000 to 6000 PSI?

    edit: zoomed in the photo and it looked like bog standard spray gun(air) with 4 bar gauge on the hose.
    That should open up the options considerably.. no need to use high pressure hydroolic parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    If you look at the Parker catalog, the very high pressure fittings have that hole. It is described as a weep hole, and it's positioned to cover half of the sealing taper. So as the seal begins to leak, it first appears as fluid leaking from the hole to give you notice that that the connection needs serviced.

    I think what you have is a cheap-as-dirt chicom imitation of a real fitting. They retain the nut with the wire because it's not high pressure, and they don't have the equipment to properly swage the assembly. So they shove a wire in there to keep it from falling apart.

    I have a box of those NPT/NPSM fittings in various sizes- none of them have a hole in the nut. They are all swaged.

    It's not a swivel connection- sounds like you want one of these:

    McMaster-Carr
    I think you are wrong. It's made in usa. I knew the owner of a hose/fitting store that sold his store and started working for Parker. He located four pieces
    and gave them to me as samples. They cost over $25 each.

    repeat:
    How that can be done with out gouging out the channel it is riding in?
    How that can be done so that the metal pin is exerting pressure on the swivel nut and tracking in a half-grooves in the barrel and back of nut?
    How that can be done to give a sliding fit like a bearing?

    another PM stumper. Nobody made this type of thing before.


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