Drill and End mill sharpening machine - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    The best way to have them resharpened is to accumulate perhaps 50 of a size and send them to a high-quality sharpening shop. The problem is length variance if that bugs you set up.
    Good to layer them so ODs don't get damaged.
    That's a good course of action if you have many multiples of the sizes you're sending out. Depending on the usage you might need a couple hundred of each size to be sure there are enough in stock to make it through the turn around time. We did that at the shop I worked in and it usually took a week or two for the turn around. Sharpening services prefer larger lots (we usually sent out 100 of each size, and at least 5 sizes at a time. Small lots were used as fill ins and would be put to the bottom of the list. If you only sent out 50 at a time the turn around could be closer to a month.

    I knew I wouldn't be sending out enough drills from my own shop to become a "preferred" customer and get a quick turn around. I originally purchased a DD750 Classic to sharpen around 50 drills a month. It did ok for a few years, then it started wearing to the point it took more time than I was willing to spend fiddling with it to get the correct geometry. I did sharpen those I was running short on, but knew the machine's time was limited.

    By the time I gave up on it I had well over 500 drills that needed sharpening. I was at a crossroads as to which way I should go when the Black Diamond came along. It took a day or so to clean it up before I could use it. I spent the next few days sharpening all the drills that had accumulated. It was a mind numbing job, so I only spent a couple hours a day on it. Since then I spend about an hour a month sharpening anything within its range.

  2. #22
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    Another vote for Black Diamond if you are a small shop, but only if you find one with the collets you need or have access to same at reasonable prices. That Ebay listing doesn't list any collets with it.

    Even then, buying new drill bits in bulk probably makes more sense, especially if you only need a few sizes.

  3. #23
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    I bought a new Darex.


    We had a job where there were many parts made from Ferralium 255 – FG46. They needed an axial hole with an extreme depth to diameter ratio. I bought some extra-long drills and added a very-high pressure coolant pump to the Mazak quick-turn 200 lathe. After playing with the drill point geometry, I found settings that worked pretty well. I would re-sharpen the drills for each new part, and they would then run unattended.


    The model I got was the Darex XT-3000 drill sharpener with their automated sharpening attachment along with CBN and diamond wheels. Not cheap, but I believe it made the job in this case. The drills were too expensive to be throw-aways.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    Not sure messing about with end mills is worth the bother, plus you end up with undersized end mills. Drills might be worth it, but be sure you know how much time you're spending. If you're doing thousands of parts, you should be buying the best quality carbide drills you can get, in bulk, so you get a good price. That will affect the economy of sharpening. Sharpening might only make sense when looking at the single piece price of a drill, or if they're biggins.
    Yes I very much agree. One also might consider the shops where these machines have been consistently used and whether they are in fact worth it. The very best move with that many holes would be first to use better drills right off the bat. Sharpening carbide is tricker even by hand in fact especially so. Even the right cobalt or brand name or quality drill starting out is very worth while. You are thinking in that vein already considering tool life for a big job with lots of drilling. Good job on that you are thinking well.

    Too keep in mind what most shops do now and under what circumstances. A shop can have those machines and still have machinists putting dull tools back in the crib. Many will not bother to even sharpen one drill. I have mostly hand ground those where feasible which for me was quite often because I have done it frequently.

    Bear in mind why we call it perishable tooling too to keep perspective.

  5. #25
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    The dedicated sharpening shop is much more efficient to sharpen end mills with having people quick and good at that task...and many charging less than the manufacturing rate.

    Sharpening/making specials can be an asset for a manufacturing shop but sharpening commons is usually not cost-efficient. IMHO.

    A small Tc grinder and a person who knows how to use it can whip out a special that might take a week or more to get..and big bucks.

    Agree, an old-school machinist can often hand-make a special but it won't be as good as one made on a Tc grinder...and a surface grinder can make specials but not as quick as a Tc grinder.

    A small TC grinder can whip out simple drills as good as a drill sharpener. A 12* slant V block is a simple fixture for a faceted drill point..then hand back off the heal..and it can make specials like step drills, odd size counterbores, bottom drills mostly made quick and easy out of a standard low priced cutter.

    I think the likes of a KoLee or Cincinnati #1 or #2 is a handy machine. It can also be used as a cut-off machine using a parting/cut-off wheel so deserving its floor space... with care it can be a quick setup to precision cut off for precise length or angles so can be very handy.

    If I found the time and had a camera set up I could make a video of the simple sharpening set-ups that many of us old-timers know...no, I'm not going to do that.

  6. #26
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    michgan, its easier said than done. if you dont use such a machine every day (like me) you walk up to it and start wondering how it actually works. at least thats what happens when i try to do something my deckel S1. it has 7 axis. brain training.

  7. #27
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    Here's my solution for drills

    Sterling Drill Grinder: Perfect grinds every time - YouTube

    My Sterling drill grinder does a fantastic job for me.

    For end mills, I have a Darex.

    A lot of guys say "send it out". Maybe that works best for a production environment. Not for a small shop like mine.

  8. #28
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    Any discussion of drill tip grinders should include the ultra low buck General Tools 825.
    Basically it is swing grinding drill fixture so can only do conical grinds. That means the drill front faces are two cones in space that intersect to make the geometry you want.
    This grind is by far the most common metal cutting drill tip.
    No S points, multi facet or helical winslow type here. The dirt simple and loved drill tip.

    It is cheap, no bearings in the swing, super light construction but once one learns how to use it makes a much better point than hand grinding.
    This thing looks like a toy for sure so maybe it falls under the do not talk about and home shop things.
    First time I saw one I was you have to be kidding me as I had a $600,000 Ewag grinder that most certainly must be better and faster.
    Bob


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