Drilling holes with a jig bore
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  1. #1
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    Default Drilling holes with a jig bore

    The cost of a jig bore is low compares to a good drill press.
    For small, sub 1/2” holes is a jig bore suitable?
    In particular for small holes, sub 1/4 is it a good mix between a sensitive drill and a drill press?
    I can always buy a big cheap beater drill press for hogging holes, but the cost for a good precision press is well above a solid used bore.

    Any how, the summary is...
    If I get a small jig bore will I also need a really good small sensitive drill pres.

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    Why don't you get a cnc mill? It will do everything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by converterking View Post
    Why don't you get a cnc mill? It will do everything.
    Not really..quick holes in un fixed or lightly retained parts aren’t good on a CNC.
    The 10 second hole becomes a two minute process.

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    I'd hardly refer to my 15,000 Lb Jig Bore as sensitive, but it was enough so to not break 3/32 tip of center drill in 364 spots that I later turned into grooves with a 3/32 carbide ball end mill.

    This repair job is in service
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p1000456sm.jpg  

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    I have a cnc bed mill that still has a manual quill. I don't have manual mills anymore, the bedmill does everything that I don't want to run in a vmc.

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    Jig borers are very accurate but slow to operate. For bog standard drilling work you want a good drill press.

    I suppose it depends if you're tinkering around in your own time or trying to make some money. If your shop is a hobby style shop get a jig borer, if you're working to make a living get a drill press.

    Just my opinion.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Answer is yes. I've drilled many small holes on jig bores and bridgeports. For really tiny drills I like to use a finger chuck.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chuck.jpg  

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    I used to use my BP for all drilling. Sold the 1/2" DP. But a few months ago I found a Burgmaster 6 spindle Turret Drill press. Its the smallest one, Max drill size is 1/4, and now use it every chance I can. Position accuracy is up to operator, but really handy for a string of holes, then countersink , Tap.

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    I have a Moore #3 that would make a dandy small drill press. I think my largest chuck is 1/2" capacity. In some ways its better than a drill press, as the counterbalanced head is much easier to move up and down than the table on a drill press.

    The biggest drawback of a Moore is the tool retention method prohibits reversing the spindle. Taping would require a tapping head. The weight could be another drawback, but if its within the capacity of your forklift weight is immaterial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    I have a Moore #3 that would make a dandy small drill press. I think my largest chuck is 1/2" capacity. In some ways its better than a drill press, as the counterbalanced head is much easier to move up and down than the table on a drill press.

    The biggest drawback of a Moore is the tool retention method prohibits reversing the spindle. Taping would require a tapping head. The weight could be another drawback, but if its within the capacity of your forklift weight is immaterial.
    Nothing a big drill press wouldn’t bridge.
    I keep looking at the “sensitive drill presses” but a 1-1/2 Moore is the same price and has a hell of a lot more capabilities.


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