Drilling out a carbide bit??? S#@t F@*K
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default Drilling out a carbide bit??? S#@t [email protected]*K

    Drilling a 0.046" 2-flute carbide bit into an unobtanium component. Broke off as it just started to exit 1/4" material.
    Hard to explain, but there is a hood over the exit hole, so I cant punch it back out in reverse.
    Is there some kind of 'super' drill-bit that I can drill through the carbide bit/plug? Largest bit I can use, largest ID I can go to, is 0.050"

    I have scoured the interweb, and came up empty handed. EDM wont work because of the overhang/hood.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,175
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    69
    Likes (Received)
    1241

    Default

    EDM should be able to sink an electrode anywhere you got a drill in. Personally, I just take a punch (core pin or ejector pin smaller than .046 should work)and try to bust up the brittle carbide. Just keep tapping away with a small hammer and punch, and blowing the chips out of the hole with air. Try not to booger up the sides of the hole too much with your punch.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Weeks View Post
    EDM should be able to sink an electrode anywhere you got a drill in. Personally, I just take a punch (core pin or ejector pin smaller than .046 should work)and try to bust up the brittle carbide. Just keep tapping away with a small hammer and punch, and blowing the chips out of the hole with air. Try not to booger up the sides of the hole too much with your punch.
    Ejector Pins on order....Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    7,712
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    385
    Likes (Received)
    6430

    Default

    They can be drilled with a diamond plated pin, a high speed spindle attachment and lots of coolant but I try to break them first as above unless I'm really worried about screwing up the hole a tad.
    Bob

  5. Likes Racer-X, Joe Miranda liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    7,376
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1740
    Likes (Received)
    5127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    They can be drilled with a diamond plated pin, a high speed spindle attachment and lots of coolant but I try to break them first as above unless I'm really worried about screwing up the hole a tad.
    Bob
    Yup, I've done that using the regular mill spindle, but granted that was a ~14mm drill, so easier to accommodate the low rpm. Slow feed, helixed in at about .0007"/turn, used two pins for ~.75" of broken drill.

    If the "hood" is too thick to punch through you can try using a 1mm diamond pin with a tiny helix from that side, you should only have to go a little before you break through to the full hole. Diamond doesn't like cutting steel, but keep the bit cool and well flushed and it'll last for a little while.

    If it shows signs of burning, stop and replace, then keep going. Don't let bits of broken diamond embed into the part, that's bad (you'll need a laser as a truly last resort).

  7. Likes Racer-X liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    496
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    115

    Default

    If the bit was coming though as it broke I would have it upside down blowing air in the exit side and tapping it on the side with a small hammer. Might shake it loose and blow it out.

    Ed.

  9. Likes Racer-X, Billtodd liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    257
    Likes (Received)
    546

    Default

    How much access do you have inside the "hood" if any and what tolerances/ finish do you have to hold?

    JR

    Edit
    I know you said unobtainiun but can you say the material or at least it's properties?

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    4,501
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1188
    Likes (Received)
    2480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    If it shows signs of burning, stop and replace, then keep going. Don't let bits of broken diamond embed into the part, that's bad (you'll need a laser as a truly last resort).
    THIS is good information, so you cannot burn out diamond? Sorry not an EDM guy.

    R

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    7,376
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1740
    Likes (Received)
    5127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    THIS is good information, so you cannot burn out diamond? Sorry not an EDM guy.

    R
    I think compacted diamond (PDC) can be EDM'd when the binder is eroded, but diamond pins use particles of natural or synthetic diamond, which I think can't be burned as they're high-temp insulators. If someone knows different please correct me.

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,083
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    903

    Default

    Diamond is kind of amazing. It is carbon, but a non conductor of electricity, yet conducts heat better than copper!

  14. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    4,501
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1188
    Likes (Received)
    2480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    Diamond is kind of amazing. It is carbon, but a non conductor of electricity, yet conducts heat better than copper!
    https://youtu.be/cJX1REQB12o

    Thought it was funny, yes I understand, that is fascinating.

  15. #12
    Johnny Larue Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Racer-X View Post
    Drilling a 0.046" 2-flute carbide bit into an unobtanium component. Broke off as it just started to exit 1/4" material.
    Hard to explain, but there is a hood over the exit hole, so I cant punch it back out in reverse.
    Is there some kind of 'super' drill-bit that I can drill through the carbide bit/plug? Largest bit I can use, largest ID I can go to, is 0.050"

    I have scoured the interweb, and came up empty handed. EDM wont work because of the overhang/hood.

    i'll bet a RAM EDM can get that out...if theres room for a drill then theres room for an electrode...use tungsten/carbide rod...or tungsten copper if you have it also....and I have done this before too....put in a heated jewelry cleaner that buzzes and put drill upside down with room for it to come out so raise job up...let cleaner vibrate pieces out and or whole drill...the heat of the cleaner will enlarge the hole sometimes and the vibration will shake it out

    PS...I have RAM EDM'ed crystal before also...but its very exacting and you must determine which way the crystal grains run...it took 3 days to go about .05 deep and it was a tungsten electrode with steel settings....example ON 003 OFF 025 MA 01 I.P 1.5 SV 04 and so on

  16. #13
    Johnny Larue Guest

    Default

    here is an old school way that is similar to jewelry cleaner method


  17. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    wales.uk
    Posts
    1,155
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    124
    Likes (Received)
    174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    Diamond is kind of amazing. It is carbon, but a non conductor of electricity, yet conducts heat better than copper!
    I read that diamond is actualy transparent to heat, it offers zero resistance, fascinating.
    Mark


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •