Dykem steel red and blue not drying consistent
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default Dykem steel red and blue not drying consistent

    Lately I've been having issues with dykem not drying consistent on aluminum and steel, I've tried smooth facemilled rough end mill and scuffed with Emory. Acetone cleaned and denat alcohol too...anyone else have these issues?

    15709803688951913709617.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails kimg0292.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    494
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    115

    Default

    That looks like what auto painters call "fish eye". Generally caused by not clean enough or left over abrasives on the surface, silicone is especially bad and hard to get rid of. Can't say I get that when I use Dykem.

    Ed.

  3. Likes Dualkit liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. George, Utah
    Posts
    856
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    386
    Likes (Received)
    544

    Default

    I agree with Ed. That's always a cleaning issue. I use acetone too, but even with that you may have to swap or fold the towel, cloth etc and go over it twice or more to get a good cleaning. In my experience, a shiny surface is not an impediment to Dykem (I use the aerosol) if it is really clean.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    I agree with Ed. That's always a cleaning issue. I use acetone too, but even with that you may have to swap or fold the towel, cloth etc and go over it twice or more to get a good cleaning. In my experience, a shiny surface is not an impediment to Dykem (I use the aerosol) if it is really clean.
    Yeah it's only the last few months I've had the issue, maybe I'll do some experimenting at tomorrow. I remember it used to almost look like anodizing. Probably operator error lol

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    mays landing NJ
    Posts
    500
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    450
    Likes (Received)
    137

    Default

    Shake the can once in a while. I had problems with the blue that was solved by shaking the can. I generally use red because it seems to me that red goes on evenly as opposed to blue.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike 44 View Post
    Shake the can once in a while. I had problems with the blue that was solved by shaking the can. I generally use red because it seems to me that red goes on evenly as opposed to blue.
    I've swished it around, I'll try shaking the bejesus out of it.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,181
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3305
    Likes (Received)
    1718

    Default

    I've had to add a little denatured alcohol to old layout die to thin it down a little bit so it will dry better.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    I've had to add a little denatured alcohol to old layout die to thin it down a little bit so it will dry better.
    We bought staining fluid once by accident...it's like paint.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Lately I've been having issues with dykem not drying consistent on aluminum and steel, I've tried smooth facemilled rough end mill and scuffed with Emory. Acetone cleaned and denat alcohol too...anyone else have these issues?

    15709803688951913709617.jpg
    This is not a "new" problem. First try a known-uncontaminated container (I use a dauber as often as a spray, so YMMV).

    Otherwise, your surface is almost certainly contaminated with something residual, and hard to get off - Silicones one of the worst, but not-only. Waxes and emulsifiers and their modifiers in coolants, too. Even fingerprints after eating tasty-gummy "dried" friut. Think vegetable oils, Glycerin, etc.

    Try Xylol / Xylene or the Toluene-ish ready-mix widely sold for clearing graffiti and painting mistakes - "Goof Off".

    You may need two steps, different solvents - even hot water and a touch of surfactant or caustic - until you figure out what it is and how it is getting there, hopefully stop it at the source going forward.

    Smooth surface is not an issue. No abrasives needed. Try your Dykem on a clean mirror or window glass. If it didn't coat, they couldn't sell it. We'd DIY artificial bird shit or use one of the lesser-known, and often cheaper brands. Which DO work, also, BTW. DAMHIKT.

    3 colours worth. It's "Made in the USA" (not-only, but at least not "Pee Are Sea" China..) ... product-patriotic!


  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    We bought staining fluid once by accident...it's like paint.
    No joke, there are actual paints that work a treat in a pinch as a substitute, white Dykem sub especially. Thin, even, coat, fast dry, good adhesion, and even clean scribe lines.

    Downside is what with a protective nature and more (also protective) pigment, they can be a right bitch to REMOVE, relative to Dykem, hence costlier, overall, even if the paint was leftover, AKA "free"!

    DAMHIKT!

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    Well today when I go in I'm going to apply these suggestions and see what happens. I've resorted to using a sharpie magnum marker for marking, it has its advantages but it's one major disadvantage is on really smooth surfaces it tends to rub off a bit.

    Thanks for all the suggestions so far!

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    So I cleaned really well with acetone, shook the new bottle didn't shake the old bottle and these were the results

    1571051740711959120497.jpg

  14. Likes Gordon Heaton liked this post
  15. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    Guess I wasn't cleaning it enough.

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    285
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17
    Likes (Received)
    24

    Default

    Cleaning is the key. I don't use a lot of Dykem so I drop a 1/4 -20 nut in the Dykem bottle to help mix when I shake it.

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Guess I wasn't cleaning it enough.
    To be fair.. Acetone has taken-over lots of the roles of "older" solvents as their serious nastiness has become better understood. Deadly "Carbon Tet" was still in use in my youth, carburettors routinely cleaned with "wood alcohol" in an open washbasin pan with a chip-brush, bare hands.

    Trichlor replaced the Carbon Tet, was thought to be so safe we scrubbed coal dust and paint off our bodies, swabbed the floors of an Oxygen plant with ordinary GI string mops of it, washed our uniforms in it to prevent oil build up MOST unwanted anywhere near pure O2, read "explosive human torch".

    And then? Many, many 55 Gal drums of it later, they ban Trichlor by the tiny half-ounce for cleaning typewriters as it causes brain cancer? And here I am on PM?



    Meanwhile, back in the shop... Acetone is one of the few we actually produce small amounts of within our own bodies, so it is at least "thought to be" one we are equipped by nature to better shed, metabolize, or neutralize, with lower risk of damage.

    While it is not a BAD solvent, neither is it exactly a "great" one for all common contaminants.

    Ignorant WATER is actually the nearest most "universal" of solvents known. It makes sense to use it when we can because it takes very little added chemistry, sometims nothing more than HEAT, to get it to do all manner of useful stuff with a higher degree of safety than hydrocarbon solvents, even if the residue wants special handling.

    Being nearly full 75 years into careless use of chemicals - Trichlor only one of many - and "statistically" already f**ked up well beyond "dead", several times over, and "too long" ago, I still use what I have always used, whatever best suits the need.

    That's not the same as a "recommendation", I AM a lot more CAREFUL at it at least.

    "Brake Cleaner" seems to have become the first "go-to" on PM? Would you believe I only use on... ta da.. brakes? And even then, sparingly. Very! And "not always", even so.

    YMMV but "more care and planning, fewer chemicals, aerosols least of all" seems wise as well as frugal.

  18. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    48
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Default

    Try a Blue Sharpie next time

  19. Likes sfriedberg liked this post
  20. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aliva View Post
    Try a Blue Sharpie next time
    OK. I'll bite. How d'yah make a BLUE sharpie lay on a RED dye?


  21. #18
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    186
    Likes (Received)
    1133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aliva View Post
    Try a Blue Sharpie next time
    I do that now, I have a couple blue magnums. As I said earlier my only problem is it rubs off easily, especially with cutting fluids. But I do often use it especially when I'm in a hurry.

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    OK. I'll bite. How d'yah make a BLUE sharpie lay on a RED dye?

    I'd guess lies to pollsters, so may of 'em are wannabee "reds" in a different sense but - different flavour of circus animal acts, up in the great North Woods - so y'all don't even have Democrat and Republican parties anyway, do yah?

    Yah.. and you are the better for it, PET French bread "True Dough" for a PM or not.

    Guess you'd have to know your fizzy cola's?

    You get a red sharpie

  22. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I do that now, I have a couple blue magnums. As I said earlier my only problem is it rubs off easily, especially with cutting fluids. But I do often use it especially when I'm in a hurry.



    You get a red sharpie
    We did. Problem is he'd rather play an arsehole than lie down and bleed dry most days.

    Bigger problem is it seems to be doing the average citizen more good than harm.
    The issue to follow is that we have always been in national SURPLUS of arseholes.
    Going to be a right bitch telling 'em apart, going forward.

    You know dogs?

    Whole country could "come to a bad end" off the back of suspicious cold-nosing?

    Guess we earned that. Long as they are sniffing each other they ain't shagging we chik'ns, so we'll just have to make the best of that.


  23. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,065
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4291
    Likes (Received)
    1828

    Default

    I am with the Sharpie crowd whenever practical. For anything less than 10 square inches, I don't even bother looking for the cans of Dykem, and for anything 10-25 square inches there's a pretty high hurdle. Just grab a fat chisel-point Sharpie (blue, green, red, or black) from the cabinet and give it a quick manual going over. Instant dry, thin film, nicely transparent (except for black).


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •