Easy to machine food safe metal for a coffee maker?
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 38
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Easy to machine food safe metal for a coffee maker?

    I'm new to machining and am working on a personal project. I'm making some parts for a manual coffee maker (similar to the Aero Press). I originally was planning on making it out of 304 stainless steel but have been reading about how difficult it can be to machine. Are there any other metals that are easier to machine and are also food safe? The material also will be in contact with coffee which is acidic.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    74
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    11
    Likes (Received)
    51

    Default

    You can machine forms and then stamp 304 in a press. Typically better for foodstuff anyway since the finish will be generally smoother.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Thanks for the tip but I unfortunately I don't have access to a press.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    8,254
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1558

    Default

    I thought brass or copper was the standard?
    Bill D

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    20,929
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16375
    Likes (Received)
    16792

    Default

    Aluminium .......used on countless coffee pots etc for more years than I've been around.

  6. Likes SAG 180, Jersey John, janvanruth liked this post
  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    20,194
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coffeemaker View Post
    Thanks for the tip but I unfortunately I don't have access to a press.
    Well, you need to 'splain what you DO have access to,
    and what this project entails (curved sheets, tig welding,
    machined blocks, etc)

  8. Likes yardbird liked this post
  9. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,111
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    172
    Likes (Received)
    1568

    Default

    There are different rules depending on where the product will be used in the chain as far as consumer/comercial/manufacturing of a food product. My friend and I built industrial coffee equipment for a few years.

    Is this going to be an end use consumer product?

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    5,086
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1331
    Likes (Received)
    2882

    Default

    316 SS is food compliant. A little easier to machine than 304, not much. Depends on what you are actually after, aesthetics and whatnot.

    R

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    I'm a member of a local techshop here in Austin TX. Here's a list of the machines available to me:



    3D Printer #1

    3D Printer #2

    D Printer (PrintrBot #1)

    D Printer (PrintrBot #2)

    Basic Sewing Machine #1

    Basic Sewing Machine #2

    CNC Embroiderer

    CNC ShopBot Alpha #1

    CNC ShopBot Alpha #2

    CNC Tormach

    Computer Classroom

    Conference Room #1

    Conference Room #2

    Conference Room #3

    eat Press

    Industrial Serger Machine

    Industrial Straight Stitch

    Industrial Walking Foot

    Injection Molding Machine

    Laser Cutter #1 (Trotec)

    Laser Cutter #2 (Trotec)

    Laser Cutter #3 (Trotec)

    Laser Cutter #4 (ULS)

    Laser Rotary Attachment

    Lathe #1 (Jet)

    Lathe #2 (Jet)

    MIG Welder #1 (Lincoln)

    MIG Welder #2 (Lincoln)

    Milling Machine #1 (Jet)

    Milling Machine #2 (Jet)

    Mini Lathe Attachment for Tormach

    Planishing Hammer

    Powder Coating Gun and Booth

    Powder Coating Oven

    Quilting Machine

    Sand Blasting Cabinet

    SawStop / Router

    Silk Screen Station

    TIG Welder #1 (Lincoln)

    TIG Welder #2 (Lincoln)

    Vacuum Former

    Vinyl Cutter

    Waterjet (Flowjet)

    Wood Lathe

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Copper or brass would also be really nice looking. Do you know where I can find out if it's safe to make food with it?

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    It's just a one or few off project for personal use. I'm mostly just concerned with it being safe. I'm making it out of metal because I don't like the idea of putting boiling water in plastic.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    5,086
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1331
    Likes (Received)
    2882

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coffeemaker View Post
    It's just a one or few off project for personal use. I'm mostly just concerned with it being safe. I'm making it out of metal because I don't like the idea of putting boiling water in plastic.
    I worked in the food industry a Millenia ago, there are plenty of plastics that can handle it, just look inside basically ANY consumer coffee maker. But a Google search found this for metals;

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...ox5ffn3n1f38ww

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    I worked in the food industry a Millenia ago, there are plenty of plastics that can handle it, just look inside basically ANY consumer coffee maker. But a Google search found this for metals;y

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...ox5ffn3n1f38ww

    Yeah, I'm machining it because it already exists in plastic and I don't want it made out of plastic. It's a personal preference thing.

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    5,086
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1331
    Likes (Received)
    2882

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coffeemaker View Post
    Yeah, I'm machining it because it already exists in plastic and I don't want it made out of plastic. It's a personal preference thing.
    Sweet, check the link provided it's for metals.

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    6,621
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5722
    Likes (Received)
    6150

    Default

    Stainless steel is THE go-to metal for food contact. As for it being difficult to machine proper tools, technique, and cutting fluid help a lot.

    If by chance you have lightweight (hobby type) equipment my advise is to modify your design to use "partly made" parts such as readily available stainless kitchen accessories for the larger parts and modify them.

  18. Likes Philabuster, Bobw, yardbird liked this post
  19. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Stainless steel is THE go-to metal for food contact. As for it being difficult to machine proper tools, technique, and cutting fluid help a lot.

    If by chance you have lightweight (hobby type) equipment my advise is to modify your design to use "partly made" parts such as readily available stainless kitchen accessories for the larger parts and modify them.
    I'm willing to learn but I'm very new to machining. The machine I have access to is a Tormach CNC Mill. I'm not sure if it's a lightweight machine or not. Does that tell you enough to know if it's a lightweight machine?

  20. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Well, you need to 'splain what you DO have access to,
    and what this project entails (curved sheets, tig welding,
    machined blocks, etc)


    3D Printer #1

    3D Printer #2

    D Printer (PrintrBot #1)

    D Printer (PrintrBot #2)

    Basic Sewing Machine #1

    Basic Sewing Machine #2

    CNC Embroiderer

    CNC ShopBot Alpha #1

    CNC ShopBot Alpha #2

    CNC Tormach

    Computer Classroom

    Conference Room #1

    Conference Room #2

    Conference Room #3

    eat Press

    Industrial Serger Machine

    Industrial Straight Stitch

    Industrial Walking Foot

    Injection Molding Machine

    Laser Cutter #1 (Trotec)

    Laser Cutter #2 (Trotec)

    Laser Cutter #3 (Trotec)

    Laser Cutter #4 (ULS)

    Laser Rotary Attachment

    Lathe #1 (Jet)

    Lathe #2 (Jet)

    MIG Welder #1 (Lincoln)

    MIG Welder #2 (Lincoln)

    Milling Machine #1 (Jet)

    Milling Machine #2 (Jet)

    Mini Lathe Attachment for Tormach

    Planishing Hammer

    Powder Coating Gun and Booth

    Powder Coating Oven

    Quilting Machine

    Sand Blasting Cabinet

    SawStop / Router

    Silk Screen Station

    TIG Welder #1 (Lincoln)

    TIG Welder #2 (Lincoln)

    Vacuum Former

    Vinyl Cutter

    Waterjet (Flowjet)

    Wood Lathe

  21. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,208
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4169
    Likes (Received)
    3970

    Default

    The iconic Bialetti Moka has been made since 1933 using aluminum.

    You either have one or know someone who does, even if like me you can't stand coffee.

    Alfonso Bialetti - Wikipedia

    Do it right and maybe you too can be as successful as Alphonso.

    smt

  22. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    20,929
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16375
    Likes (Received)
    16792

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    The iconic Bialetti Moka has been made since 1933 using aluminum.

    You either have one or know someone who does, even if like me you can't stand coffee.

    Alfonso Bialetti - Wikipedia

    Do it right and maybe you too can be as successful as Alphonso.

    smt
    SO that's what they're called! I've never known but that's exactly what I remembered from my childhood, ............Mum told me it had been a wedding present in 1952

    Thanks SMT

  23. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    6,621
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5722
    Likes (Received)
    6150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coffeemaker View Post
    I'm willing to learn but I'm very new to machining. The machine I have access to is a Tormach CNC Mill. I'm not sure if it's a lightweight machine or not. Does that tell you enough to know if it's a lightweight machine?
    That certainly should be able to machine stainless with appropriate depth of cut per pass. The CNC pros here can tell you what cutters to use.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •