Enco 100-1588 repair
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default Enco 100-1588 repair

    Our high school has a '92 Enco 100-1588 10x54" mill. One of the students called me over, saying is was vibrating a lot. The head was quite warm. After pulling it apart, I found that the top motor pulley was cracked. Inside the cover was coated with belt dust.

    2020-01-29-22.34.24.jpg

    The set screw was long gone. I've got a new pulley on the way. I later discovered that the motor shaft is a mess. Look like someone took an angle grinder to it!

    2020-01-30-19.56.38.jpg

    The journal at the faceplate has about a thou runout. The low portion of the shaft, where the bottom pulley slides up and down, has about 4 thou runout. I haven't priced out a new motor yet. I'm sure its not cheap, assuming it available. I was surprised when MSC said they had the pulley.

    Is the 4 thou runout too excessive?

    The keyways are not the best either:

    2020-01-30-19.30.09.jpg

    While I have the thing apart, I plan to replace all the bearings except for the spindle bearings. Both belts will be replaced as well.

    The spline on the top of the "worm coupling shaft is pretty worn. Not sure it really need replacement though. We almost never use it in low speed.

    This is the top shaft,

    2020-01-30-20.15.01.jpg

    And the bottom:

    2020-01-30-20.59.33.jpg

    Any comments, suggestions etc are greatly appreciated. I'm not a machinist, just a high school robotics mentor who doesn't know not to take stuff apart! My main worry right now is the motor shaft runout.

    Oh, one last thing. where is a good source for replacement bearings? They are mostly 6xxxZ. I assume MSC is going to charge me a lot more for them. As you can guess, we don't have an unlimited budget!

    Thanks for your help,

    Andy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    marysville ohio
    Posts
    9,790
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2807
    Likes (Received)
    6490

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ariyama View Post
    Our high school has a '92 Enco 100-1588 10x54" mill. One of the students called me over, saying is was vibrating a lot. The head was quite warm. After pulling it apart, I found that the top motor pulley was cracked. Inside the cover was coated with belt dust.

    2020-01-29-22.34.24.jpg

    The set screw was long gone. I've got a new pulley on the way. I later discovered that the motor shaft is a mess. Look like someone took an angle grinder to it!

    2020-01-30-19.56.38.jpg

    The journal at the faceplate has about a thou runout. The low portion of the shaft, where the bottom pulley slides up and down, has about 4 thou runout. I haven't priced out a new motor yet. I'm sure its not cheap, assuming it available. I was surprised when MSC said they had the pulley.

    Is the 4 thou runout too excessive?

    The keyways are not the best either:

    2020-01-30-19.30.09.jpg

    While I have the thing apart, I plan to replace all the bearings except for the spindle bearings. Both belts will be replaced as well.

    The spline on the top of the "worm coupling shaft is pretty worn. Not sure it really need replacement though. We almost never use it in low speed.

    This is the top shaft,

    2020-01-30-20.15.01.jpg

    And the bottom:

    2020-01-30-20.59.33.jpg

    Any comments, suggestions etc are greatly appreciated. I'm not a machinist, just a high school robotics mentor who doesn't know not to take stuff apart! My main worry right now is the motor shaft runout.

    Oh, one last thing. where is a good source for replacement bearings? They are mostly 6xxxZ. I assume MSC is going to charge me a lot more for them. As you can guess, we don't have an unlimited budget!

    Thanks for your help,

    Andy
    The shaft is toast, time for a new motor. To bad you bought a new pulley, you could have saved the old one by making a steel ring and pressing it on, as long as the bore is good.

  3. Likes Newman109, eKretz liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    1,888
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1221
    Likes (Received)
    899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    The shaft is toast, time for a new motor. To bad you bought a new pulley, you could have saved the old one by making a steel ring and pressing it on, as long as the bore is good.
    haha! how COULD the bore be any good?? virtually impossible.

    try H&W machine repair for the bearings, they seem to sell them for reasonable prices.

  5. Likes TDegenhart liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    The shaft is toast, time for a new motor. To bad you bought a new pulley, you could have saved the old one by making a steel ring and pressing it on, as long as the bore is good.
    I thought about doing that, but the bore is no good. I can feel that it is deformed, at least at the top. I suppose I would have had to press a collar on it to know for sure, but it didn't seem likely to me. I'm the only one there to look after the machines. I want to make sure it will continue run for a long time, even if I'm not there to fix it.
    Last edited by ariyama; 02-03-2020 at 01:21 AM. Reason: typos

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    haha! how COULD the bore be any good?? virtually impossible.

    try H&W machine repair for the bearings, they seem to sell them for reasonable prices.
    I will give them a call, thanks. Their videos have helped me a lot, even though the Enco mill is a bit different.

    Thanks.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    1079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ariyama View Post

    Oh, one last thing. where is a good source for replacement bearings? They are mostly 6xxxZ. I assume MSC is going to charge me a lot more for them. As you can guess, we don't have an unlimited budget!
    I have gone with Motion Industries for bearings. I could call the local office in my city and they would get the bearings on their regular daily
    truck delivery from the warehouse.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    South Bend, In
    Posts
    2,699
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    183
    Likes (Received)
    275

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by ariyama View Post
    Our high school has a '92 Enco 100-1588 10x54" mill. One of the students called me over, saying is was vibrating a lot. The head was quite warm. After pulling it apart, I found that the top motor pulley was cracked. Inside the cover was coated with belt dust.

    2020-01-29-22.34.24.jpg

    The set screw was long gone. I've got a new pulley on the way. I later discovered that the motor shaft is a mess. Look like someone took an angle grinder to it!

    2020-01-30-19.56.38.jpg

    The journal at the faceplate has about a thou runout. The low portion of the shaft, where the bottom pulley slides up and down, has about 4 thou runout. I haven't priced out a new motor yet. I'm sure its not cheap, assuming it available. I was surprised when MSC said they had the pulley.

    Is the 4 thou runout too excessive?

    The keyways are not the best either:

    2020-01-30-19.30.09.jpg

    While I have the thing apart, I plan to replace all the bearings except for the spindle bearings. Both belts will be replaced as well.

    The spline on the top of the "worm coupling shaft is pretty worn. Not sure it really need replacement though. We almost never use it in low speed.

    This is the top shaft,

    2020-01-30-20.15.01.jpg

    And the bottom:

    2020-01-30-20.59.33.jpg

    Any comments, suggestions etc are greatly appreciated. I'm not a machinist, just a high school robotics mentor who doesn't know not to take stuff apart! My main worry right now is the motor shaft runout.

    Oh, one last thing. where is a good source for replacement bearings? They are mostly 6xxxZ. I assume MSC is going to charge me a lot more for them. As you can guess, we don't have an unlimited budget!

    Thanks for your help,

    Andy
    I have a N.O.S. motor from a MSC mill that looks like it could be the same.
    Send me an email with the specs and we’ll figure it out.
    Ted
    [email protected]

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    17,261
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Another company supplying aftermarket parts for the clones is High Quality Tools, in cleveland, ohio
    High Quality Tools, Milling Machine Parts | HQTInc.com

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    The shaft is toast, time for a new motor. To bad you bought a new pulley, you could have saved the old one by making a steel ring and pressing it on, as long as the bore is good.
    I stand corrected. There is a lip on the end of the bore, but it is on the outside. Sadly the students destroyed the snap gauge I needed to check it properly. With the calipers it looked to be spot on the 1.1 inch diameter of the of the motor shaft. That does not seem possible given the crack. Of course I have no idea how much runout there is. Still, I'll feel better having a new pulley in there. If it were my own machine, not the school's, I might go that way.

    What would the acceptable runout be for the motor shaft?

    Looking at it more closely tonight, I see the keyways have severely worn sides. So runout is not the only issue.
    Last edited by ariyama; 02-03-2020 at 10:16 PM. Reason: typos

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default Worn splines

    The the splines the ends of the upper and low coupling shafts are a bit worn; particularly the lower one:

    2020-02-03-21.12.06.jpg

    The upper coupling shaft:

    2020-02-03-21.13.07.jpg

    You can see the wear were they mate ( they are upside down - lower coupler is on top ):

    2020-02-03-21.14.23.jpg

    I think the lower one should be replaced. Upper seems OK.

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default Experience is what you get....

    Yeah, I screwed this one up. I was trying to get the coupler shaft out of the worm housing. The rubber mallet wasn't doing it. Over to the arbor press.

    Then the "oh crap" moment, when I realized I bent what I think is a "spring shim" on the part diagram. I wedged in hard enough that the only way to get it out was to cut it. The damage was already done!

    2020-02-03-21.11.33.jpg

    Experience earned

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    2,827
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Despite the peanut gallery ,such things are a simple repair for anyone with a lathe.....skim the motor shaft till its true,sleeve the break in the pulley boss ....bore the pulley boss until the bore is clean .....make a split bushing for the gap, and find or make a wider key and fit it ....press it all together with loctite used liberally.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default If I had a bigger one

    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Despite the peanut gallery ,such things are a simple repair for anyone with a lathe.....skim the motor shaft till its true,sleeve the break in the pulley boss ....bore the pulley boss until the bore is clean .....make a split bushing for the gap, and find or make a wider key and fit it ....press it all together with loctite used liberally.
    John,

    If I had a big enough lathe, I would tackle it. The school only has toy lathes. Hmm, I might be able to do the motor at home in my 10" unmentionable. I'll disassemble the motor tonight and see if its possible. Guess I can't make it much worse. I could tig weld the keyway and mill back to size. There is a splined adapter that is keyed on the inside. If I enlarged the keyway in the shaft, I'd have to do it it on that as well, potentially weakening it. Tigging the shaft would likely warp it more tough.

    Thanks.

    Andy

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    2,827
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Have a look at an advice bulletin for green loctite and loctite key repair. ...there are lots of suggestions for fixing just such a situation .

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Have a look at an advice bulletin for green loctite and loctite key repair. ...there are lots of suggestions for fixing just such a situation .
    John,

    Loctite 660? Found some videos on it. Looks pretty good.

    Thanks,

    Andy

  18. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default Motor shaft

    We pulled apart the motor tonight. After we pressed the bearings off, I checked the journals. Well under a thou runout. I didn't have a tenths indicator handy, but I would guess about half a thou. That gives me a good reference surface. I think it worth trying to turn it down, build it back up with the tig welder, and any down to size. If I fail, I end up getting a new motor, which I was going to have to do anyway. Either way I'll learn something in the process!

    The next step is figuring out what filler metal to use.

    (photo taken after the fact)
    2020-02-04-19.47.48.jpg

    This is the splined collar that goes on the shaft. Pretty beat up, and loose on the shaft. I'll try to get a replacement.

    2020-02-04-20.54.02.jpg

    There is a plastic mate to that that fits in the bottom pulley. That is quite worn too. Another thing to replace.
    Last edited by ariyama; 02-05-2020 at 01:08 PM. Reason: typos

  19. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. George, Utah
    Posts
    1,032
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    564
    Likes (Received)
    686

    Default

    Did you see post #7? I'd start there for the motor problems!

  20. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    316
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    Did you see post #7? I'd start there for the motor problems!
    Gordon,

    Yes, I contacted Ted and he kindly measured his motor. It looks like a close fit, I'd need check my numbers again. His motor is a 2HP, while mine is 3HP. I'll proceed with the repair for both the challenge and the experience. In a commercial setting it might not make sense, but for the school, we have more time than money.

    Thanks,

    Andy

  21. Likes Gordon Heaton liked this post
  22. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    N. GA- 33.992N , -83.72W usa
    Posts
    3,818
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    888

    Default

    if the flange and shaft fit i wouldn't be too critical of 2hp vs 3hp . in the 90's , there were many machines
    boasting optimistic hp ratings which included "peak"
    and "15 minute duty cycles" . even a real BPT today isn't completely innocent of the practice .

    putting a slightly smaller hp motor might be to advantage- less wear and stress on an old
    machine , which was already junk the day it left the factory .

  23. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Beaverdam, Virginia
    Posts
    8,113
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    913
    Likes (Received)
    3899

    Default

    As for bearings if you haven't bought them yet sometimes you can find great deals on Ebay for high quality precision bearings. I scored a matched set of spindle bearings, name brand that are $400 a set at the cheapest from bearing suppliers for $35.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •