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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    ... unlike, say, thread wires (which should get the flank of a perfect 60 degree thread right) thread mics can be easily used with a part still in the lathe.
    Umm, what ? I use thread wires in a lathe all the time. Big bubbles no troubles.

    I won't say I prefer thread wires but they work perfectly and cost a lot less.

    Do your Tesas have those slant lines ? I hate those. Otherwise Tesa is almost as nice as Etalon ...

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    Guess you've never dropped a thread wire in a tray of chips? My own experience: smaller the thread the more the PIA the thread wires.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Guess you've never dropped a thread wire in a tray of chips?
    About the only thing I haven't dropped in the chip pan is the dog

    I still prefer them to the mikes.

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    I know this may be frowned upon, but I have these up to 3"

    Accusize Industrial Tools 0-1'' by 0.001'' Screw Thread Micrometer with 5 Anvil in Fitted Box, S916-C750: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

    More or less, same china brand junk, but unless you are using every day to high tolerance (?) threads they work good enough. Except I bought mine a very long time ago for something like $100 for 3 pairs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    About the only thing I haven't dropped in the chip pan is the dog

    I still prefer them to the mikes.
    I suppose you also use an indicator to pick up edges instead of an edge finder, even though it is +/-.005" dimension...??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    I suppose you also use an indicator to pick up edges instead of an edge finder, even though it is +/-.005" dimension...??
    I had one of those little battery things with the red light. Worked good on anything but plastic ... or wood, I guess. That's about as electronic as I get

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    I know this may be frowned upon, but I have these up to 3"

    Accusize Industrial Tools 0-1'' by 0.001'' Screw Thread Micrometer with 5 Anvil in Fitted Box, S916-C750: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

    More or less, same china brand junk, but unless you are using every day to high tolerance (?) threads they work good enough. Except I bought mine a very long time ago for something like $100 for 3 pairs.
    I have the exact same ones. There is nothing wrong with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Munruh, Looks like what I have left are Swiss-made B&S/Tesa 0-1" and 1-2" with a complete set of US spec anvils (7 pair). Can send pix if you'd like. They're near mint condition and complete including the 1" thread standard. Closest Ebay comparable I could find (the 1-2" only, in fair and paint-marked condition) is this: NICE ! BROWN SHARPE SCREW THREAD MICROMETER 1 - 2 " .001 " | eBay

    One advantage of these is that the anvils are interchangeable with Mitutoyo. I suspect Tesa established the standard, and Mitutoyo followed.

    I'd sell the pair (0-1 and 1-2") for $425, plus whatever shipping and insurance you'd want. Same as the Ebay recently "sold" price for just one mic in lesser condition. Problem is, I don't have a 2-3". Also have a Mahr 0-1", beautiful thread mic, but only with two pairs of fine thread anvils and not as easy to find additions (but others may fit, see below). Somewhere I might have a 0-25mm Mahr with more anvils that can be used, but it seems to be hiding.
    send me photos please.

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    The Mit thead mics are nice, I've them up to 4" with the anvils, and some metrics as well. You can either spend a ton of dough or wait for deals - the old "you want fast cheap high quality, pick two".

    If you want to patiently wait, in the meantime, use thread wires. Low cost and even after you get all the thread mics, still very useful as shop life throws oddballs at your - a Acme, Buttress thread, BA thread, Whitworth etc. thread wires can handle anything. The can be tricky to handle, but lots of ways of helping with that....photos below, redundant for the experienced guys, but I had to pics so what the heck. plastercine, grease and the last is using a bit of inner tube, third wire is hand held

    Mostly, thread fits are to quite a bit looser tolerances that a lot of work we do. Even the most demanding class are to say 1/2 a thou with more commons have a range of a few thou. This means any decent thread wire set or mic will be more than accurate enough.








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    That's a nice simple way to hold the wires - with the plasticine.
    I've only ever had luck with wires over an inch because i have sausage fingers and am clumsy and as previously said, swarf tray and gravity are against me

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    I believe, meaning I could be wrong....but the hard Standards I've used have always qualified slightly large. This insures that you are within the Min. and Max. P.D.

    But it's important to remember that a Pitch Micrometer is essentially a tool for comparison to the hard Standard, not an actual measurement of Diameter. IE. You can use a C-clamp to measure a diameter----as long as it's qualified. In that logic, it doesn't really matter which is the highest quality tool. What matters is your ability to calibrate and qualify it.

    R

    I like Mit. BTW

    R

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    I use wires all the time.
    1) With the mike set too big, position it over the work and slide two wires over the anvil and lift up the mike to hold them in position. Slide the third wire in at the top and take the measurement. Real quick, real easy!

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    I have Mitutoyo thread mikes 0 -1 and 1 - 2 and Shars to 6" there after. The Mitu are maybe 30 years old and the Shars 7. Both are excellently made but vastly different in price. I suspect the Mitu will have a much longer service life compared to the Shars but I haven't used them that much, maybe a dozen times a year. I bought both Mitu and one set of anvils to share between them. The Shars came each with a basic set of V thread anvils for about 1/3 the price of Mitutoyo equivalents.

    If you anticipate daily use in a production setting or the mikes have to be entered in a calibration program, get the Mitutoyo.

    If your use is less frequent and QA requirements are relaxed, get the Shars. They may be import and low in cost but they are very acceptable for everday use in the open shop.

    I caution everyone about disparaging this or that simply because it's imported and low in price. What may have been true a generation ago may no longer be the case today. Chinese precision tools of the 1970's and '80's were lamentable but since then their quality has much improved. Present day Chinese precision tool QA, fit, and finish are orders of magnitude better than days of yore. The last hurdle seems to be metallurgy and heat treating and that's seen recent improvement. But a general improvement in quality is no reason to relax vigilence. Shop carefuly when buying anything you're not familiar with.

    I can't address other offerings because I have no experience with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    I have Mitutoyo thread mikes 0 -1 and 1 - 2 and Shars to 6" there after. The Mitu are maybe 30 years old and the Shars 7. Both are excellently made but vastly different in price. I suspect the Mitu will have a much longer service life compared to the Shars but I haven't used them that much, maybe a dozen times a year. I bought both Mitu and one set of anvils to share between them. The Shars came each with a basic set of V thread anvils for about 1/3 the price of Mitutoyo equivalents.

    If you anticipate daily use in a production setting or the mikes have to be entered in a calibration program, get the Mitutoyo.

    If your use is less frequent and QA requirements are relaxed, get the Shars. They may be import and low in cost but they are very acceptable for everday use in the open shop.


    I caution everyone about disparaging this or that simply because it's imported and low in price. What may have been true a generation ago may no longer be the case today. Chinese precision tools of the 1970's and '80's were lamentable but since then their quality has much improved. Present day Chinese precision tool QA, fit, and finish are orders of magnitude better than days of yore. The last hurdle seems to be metallurgy and heat treating and that's seen recent improvement. But a general improvement in quality is no reason to relax vigilence. Shop carefuly when buying anything you're not familiar with.

    I can't address other offerings because I have no experience with them.
    This and this ^ ... !

    Like the cheapies I linked earlier, if you only use them once in a blue moon they are great. If you use them a few times a week, they are great. If you need to accurately measure threads all day, maybe spring for a better quality brand.... even then, the shop should be responsible for a 'specialty' item like a thread mic...

    I bought some cheap china brand 0-12" calipers some time in the later nineties or early 00's and they still work fine. I don't often need to measure past 6", but when I do these are pretty good. Just recently checked them with a 6" standard (4+2 gage block) and they were spot on....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post

    The can be tricky to handle, but lots of ways of helping with that....photos below, redundant for the experienced guys, but I had to pics so what the heck. plastercine, grease and the last is using a bit of inner tube, third wire is hand held







    Thank you Mcgyver! I will implement one or two of those suggestions next time I use my wires! Been used to fumbling around holding them by hand and didn’t want to buy the plastic holders. Like the grease and inner tube ideas...


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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    Why didn't you post in the proper "meteorology" section ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Why didn't you post in the proper "meteorology" section ?
    Ain't nobody got time for the bullshit that comes with posting in there

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Ain't nobody got time for the bullshit that comes with posting in there
    Yes,agreed, but it goes where it's supposed to go.

    Plus, it's the OP's time for "the barrel".

    management is turning a blind eye to the problems down there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by basalt View Post
    I use wires all the time.
    1) With the mike set too big, position it over the work and slide two wires over the anvil and lift up the mike to hold them in position. Slide the third wire in at the top and take the measurement. Real quick, real easy!
    When I use thread wires i put the two wires over the thread and spread one end apart slightly wrapping masking tape around the wires leaving a tail where the tape ends. this leave a little slack so the wires a free to align and the extra tail makes them easy to find when you drop them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    That's a nice simple way to hold the wires - with the plasticine.
    I've only ever had luck with wires over an inch because i have sausage fingers and am clumsy and as previously said, swarf tray and gravity are against me
    And here I thot was the ONLY newbie kid, 1959 or 1960, fool enough to fumble about using them horizontally?

    "Young Karl" (55'ish or so was "young", we had two Karls) didn't say a word to me nor even give me puzzled look nor SE grin, either one.

    Saw me struggling, stepped over, grabbed sumthin' handy, slapped it across the ways, stood the jump of gummy stuff on it, wires vertical..... and moseyed back over to his bench.

    Be damned.

    Didn't need three hands and fumble-f**king about after all.

    Unless mebbe I had threads as weren't the same horizontally as vertically?

    Mind - it were only a 9" swing Iron-bearing cone-head lathe...

    Even so.. the concept kinda "scales"?

    Let yer thread wires "stand tall" for not being so hard to use after all, and yah gets a "free".......hand.



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