Favorite Adjustable Machine Light?
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  1. #1
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    Default Favorite Adjustable Machine Light?

    The light on my Bridgeport took a shit the other day, didn't realize how bad I needed it. Looking around at replacements, and there are a LOT of options.

    Looking for something that articulates a bit, and can run off 120v wall power. Would like to stay under $200 if possible.

    Suggestions?

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    a lot of LED shoplights now are cheap and quiet powerful, in addition to run cooler and consume much less energy. For $200 you can easily lit up entire area like it's high noon, enough that you don't need a spot light. My beef with spotlights are shadows and constantly peering around it, adjusting the damn thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mach2 View Post
    I’ve been using led bulbs in these with much improved lighting

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    Good lighting on a machine? This has worked out very, very well on my floor stand, drill press:



    Why?

    1. It is all LED so power and heat are minimal.

    2. The two adjustable lights are a somewhat broad source, about 3 inches in diameter. This helps to soften the light so you can see features in the work better. Point sources of light can be harsh and make viewing of small details more difficult.

    3. I have an Edison base, LED bulb in the recess in the head casting where the original, OEM light is located. Using a standard form factor bulb there also provides a somewhat broad source.

    4. These three LED lamps are at roughly 120 degree angles around the quill axis. This provides light from three directions so that your hands and other things on the table do not block all of them at any one time. Most of the time, at least two of the lamps are not blocked by any obstacle. This was inspired by my experience with photographic copy stands which often have four lights placed two on each side and two front and two at the back (the light comes from the four corners). This provides very good, flat lighting. I compromised with three since the DP already had the one at the rear.

    5. I can adjust the two front lamps as needed, but this is not really needed very often. The three direction light sources work very well.

    6. And the two lights were only $15 or $20 at a local home supply store.

    I added a duplex outlet on the wood tool shelf that is fastened to the column. It is behind the column. It is wired to the built in switch so that all three lights come on with the front light switch.

    I tried some smaller LED lights on my mill and do not like the result. I am presently looking for some lights similar to the ones on the DP for it and plan to use a three position arrangement like the drill press. Or perhaps even four of them in the four corners.

    The ring lights around the quill are also good, but can interfere with some accessories, like those clamps for holding a DTI on the rotating OD of the quill. I prefer to keep that area as clear and open as possible. And the light from them drops off as you get away from the quill axis.

    A bit more about the value of broad lights: I worked in TV and have seen many lighting problems. Broad lights are a common answer to lighting problems and many studio lights are made this way. Many TV sets are lit with dozens of individual lights, often using two or three lights for each individual position where a person will be. Many professional lights even have "barn doors" and internal stops to limit the extent of the light to exactly where it is needed. This works, but when someone or something moves a foot or two away from that exact spot where those lights are set, the quality of the light goes downhill rapidly. OTOH, I once was a TV news set lit with just two really big, broad lights set on the left and right sides. They were about 15 KW each and about 6 or 8 feet wide. The lighting was totally excellent all the way across a set that was around 25 feet wide. Broad lights work. Broad lights ROCK!

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    I am using LED lights.

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    This is an old LED light bar from my jeep. It was too broad for the jeep but perfect for my mill. I think it was about $40 on amazon. Bought a $15 power supply and wired it direct to the mill so when it's on the light is on. Shadows aren't a problem because it's 32" long. There's tons of different sizes and shapes of LED offroad lights that are cheap. The radiant heat aspect is pretty minimal also, both in the beam of light and around the housing as well, unlike halogens. They're water resistant also, so coolant hasn't been an issue. I also did one a long time ago with a 4 Led square pod attached to a cheap mag base so its adjustable and portable, and powered it with an old laptop power supply.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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    A 4' 2 lamp LED on each side of the head parallel to the ram is the best I have used.

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    I got these for all my machines a while back and run 200w bulbs in them, put the light right where it's needed:

    Sewing Machine Flexible Gooseneck Working Lamp Light 747465098714 | eBay

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    Simple ole articulating desk-lamp with an led spot/flood (one on right and left), really easy to adjust anywhere, and to mount just need any block with a 1/2 dia hole. The older Luxo ones are good quality, but any will do. I hate goosenecks, they always spring around from where you adjust them, particularly if you have to really contort something, plus they will not "extend" like a tension-arm articulating lamp. Also, the ones where you have to loosen clamps to adjust are a pain, I always move the lighting angle around all over the place using the BPT.

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    Sunnex. They last forever and you can actually get parts for them when and if they break. I have them all over the shop and a bunch at home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by car2 View Post
    Simple ole articulating desk-lamp with an led spot/flood (one on right and left)....
    Yep - same here, though I added a small magnetic-mount 12V LED lamp under the ram, right behind the spindle to fill in the shadow in the back of the tool.

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    Headlamp! It's always shining where I'm looking.
    Tired of buying AAA's so I just ordered a pair of rechargeables off Amazon.

    I have an LED lightstorm over my lathe and nothing over my mill. The mill is a Fray, so the head is not always in the same place. Headlamp!
    Magnetic flashlights on both machines. Usually one hanging on the tailstock, pointed at the chuck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arc-On View Post
    The light on my Bridgeport took a shit the other day, didn't realize how bad I needed it. Looking around at replacements, and there are a LOT of options.

    Looking for something that articulates a bit, and can run off 120v wall power. Would like to stay under $200 if possible.

    Suggestions?
    Not adjustable but a really great light
    VISION 3.5 LED RING LIGHT 126 LEDS CNC R8 KNEE MILL BRIDGEPORT PROTOTRAK IP68 | eBay


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