Feather Fill G2(bondo) won't cure
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default Feather Fill G2(bondo) won't cure

    Hello all,
    I have been working on repainting my Bridgeport mill body , knee. I cleaned all paint and bondo off. Then I primed with pro form epoxy. That seems to go well. After that hardened I proceeded to spray 3 coats of Evercoat featherfill G2 from a new can I just bought letting the coats flash off for about 10 minutes as the directions instruct you to do so. The problem is after 3 days I can still scrape the filler off with my finger nail. And it is to soft to sand with out clogging up then sand paper. I have used the proper amount of hardener and sprayed at 71 degrees with 60% humidity. Will this cure or do I need to sand off every bit and start over. Which I really wouldn't want to have to do. Please give me good news!


    Thanks Matt.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Auburn CA
    Posts
    435
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    39

    Default

    I would contact the manufacturer. There are good videos saying sandable in 3 hours. I would also try a paint forum as opposed to a machining forum. It is a paint problem, not a mill problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simmons View Post
    I would contact the manufacturer. There are good videos saying sandable in 3 hours
    I will try calling them tomorrow

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,259
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    985

    Default

    Use a heat lamp on one spot. If the cure is accelerated in that spot then you can work the lamp around.

    They might tell you to lightly sand and apply a thin coat.
    Don't know exactly what you did but just a thought. A flash coat does not equal the thickness of a regular spray coat. I suspect you went on too thick and all you need is some lamp work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    Use a heat lamp on one spot. If the cure is accelerated in that spot then you can work the lamp around.

    They might tell you to lightly sand and apply a thin coat.
    Don't know exactly what you did but just a thought. A flash coat does not equal the thickness of a regular spray coat. I suspect you went on too thick and all you need is some lamp work.
    Would a regular heater work or does it need to be an infrared heater?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Auburn CA
    Posts
    435
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    39

    Default

    A regular heater would work, or a space heater. Don't you have a heat wave there now? What did the excess material removed from the gun or the inside of the mixing cup do? Videos indicate get it out of the gun in 45 minutes or lose the gun. I do not think excess thickness would cause a failure to set with this type of material. The videos spoke of large builds filling pin holes. I assume no reducer is used as you want it thick but if used was it the right stuff?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,259
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    985

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvernon View Post
    Would a regular heater work or does it need to be an infrared heater?
    If it was me I would just use a 100 watt light bulb in one small area and not too close to cause more problems.
    Just warm up the surface and see. If it causes some curing to complete then maybe heating the space over night would solve the issue.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    St, Paul MN
    Posts
    593
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    91
    Likes (Received)
    96

    Default

    Did you add the hardner?? Should be 1 little tube to 1 qt

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmikkalson View Post
    Did you add the hardner?? Should be 1 little tube to 1 qt
    I know I sound like I am a moron. But yes I added the hardener.

  10. Likes Yan Wo liked this post
  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    First mixture was 8oz to 5ml of hardner
    2nd and 3rd was 16 oz to 11ml of hardner

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    4,889
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2637
    Likes (Received)
    2382

    Default

    Assuming it's a styrene type filler with a benzoyl peroxide hardener. How old was the hardener. It can go off. Older resin usually cures more quickly, but if the peroxide in the hardener has decayed, then it won't kick off the styrene hardening.

    If it's a polyurethane or acrylic with an isocyanate hardener, then that ain't the problem.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    So I have decided to remove it and start over. I have scrapped as much off as I can. Now what? I don't want to smear it into the cast iron. The Date on the hardener is from feb 2019

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lino Lakes, Minnesota
    Posts
    186
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvernon View Post
    So I have decided to remove it and start over. I have scrapped as much off as I can. Now what? I don't want to smear it into the cast iron. The Date on the hardener is from feb 2019
    Use acetone to clean up the rest.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ORAGRAG View Post
    Use acetone to clean up the rest.
    That didn't do much. Think I could wet sand blast it off?

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    16,143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvernon View Post
    That didn't do much. Think I could wet sand blast it off?

    try lighting the acetone & bondo soaked Bridgeport on fire.....

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,259
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    985

    Default

    You should have learned by now one thing:

    Don't cover large areas with one big bleeding batch.

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    RC, CA
    Posts
    1,979
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    211
    Likes (Received)
    377

    Default

    FWIW. my limited experience using bondo to finish MDF molds for CF parts.

    Thin layers were always sticky unless I upped the hardener ratio. I was guessing it was because the thin layers didn't generate enough heat to cure well.

    I also found if I bulled my way thru sanding, once I got thru the surface it was hard enough to sand halfway decent.

    It's supposed to not fully cure if it has contact with air, so the next coat will chemically bond?

    Whatever, hated that crap. Never mind the stench. If I ever need to do it again, I'll pay whatever EPOXY filler costs.

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    St, Paul MN
    Posts
    593
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    91
    Likes (Received)
    96

    Default

    Did you figure it out?


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •