Form or cut tap for chasing tight threads in nickel plate brass?
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  1. #1
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    Default Form or cut tap for chasing tight threads in nickel plate brass?

    I use a lot of nickel plated brass hardware on my banjos, and often internal threads need to be chased because they are too tight. Threads range from 6-32 to 10-24. sometimes 8-26 (custom made taps)

    I've been using cutting taps, but wonder if I should be using forming taps? Seems the nickel should be tough on cutting edges. I really like the form taps for stuff I make, especially in blind holes.

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    I'd try a forming tap, since the threads are already cut in and you just need to "loosen them up".

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    Sometimes you can loosen up a thread that small by wrapping steel wool around the tap and going at it a few times.

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    If it were me, I'd use a cut tap to chase the threads.

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    if you're already having custom taps made, why not have them ground to an H5?

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    Short piece of threaded rod in a cordless drill plus some clover compound. Clean up is a pain.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by adh2000 View Post
    Short piece of threaded rod in a cordless drill plus some clover compound. Clean up is a pain.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    True. I used that technique on a big threaded hole in a welded part. Turned sorta oval shaped after welding. I needed it to turn smooth and didnt have a tap that large. Couple minutes with some aluminum oxide compound and a bolt and it's butter smooth.

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    Tbanks for the replies. These are parts sorta like fancy acorn nuts that I'm buying, not my tap that's causing trouble. Cut tap chases them just fine.

    If I start making these myself, I'd drill and form tap after plating. Better threads and no crap stuck in the blind holes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Tbanks for the replies. These are parts sorta like fancy acorn nuts that I'm buying, not my tap that's causing trouble. Cut tap chases them just fine.

    If I start making these myself, I'd drill and form tap after plating. Better threads and no crap stuck in the blind holes.
    Right. In something like brass, especially with an already cut tap, and especially especially in a bind hole, a form tap aughtta be quicker since you aren't making chips. Plus wear isn't much of a concern.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
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    Use an oversize plating tap when tapping the hole, saves the effort of recapping
    Mark

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