Gauge Making: O1 Steel Bending & Repercussions?
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  1. #1
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    Question Gauge Making: O1 Steel Bending & Repercussions?

    Gauge Making: O1 Steel Bending & Repercussions?

    The French Government has decided to close Universities, presumably in the hope that the kids will take the opportunity to 'up skill' (because they are not getting this in their formal education).
    ... and by good fortune, this coincides with my son 'waking up' to the fact that he really needs to gain practical skills.

    Consequently, it will be my pleasure to teach him how to mark off, accurately drill & file, and how to sharpen tools ... drills in particular.
    The plan is that this will culminate in him making his first tool ... why not a gauge?

    The gauge in question, is likely to be a drill gauge.
    He won't be able to use this gauge in a formal work environment, however the task, and end product, will be useful for many reasons.

    The concept is currently in the planning phase.
    3mm x 40mm seems to be meaty enough for the task (by required length).

    Gauge Concept


    A plate containing tool angles, and an 80 degree bent plate, containing a variety of drill bit seats that will enable cutting edges to scribe their height
    ... this to enable both cutting edge heights to be determined.

    Probably also, a pointed screw, for locating centred drills.

    Proposed Method

    Create the required gauges, and seats, with the material flat.
    File a groove along the bend point, to 1mm depth.
    Clamp the piece to a cast bench, over an off cut of the gauge plate, that has has been cut to (say) a 70 degree knife.
    Likely, heat the bend area with a butane torch, and bend to the required angle.
    In this way, the drill seats will direct the drill bits towards the plate, for edge height calibration.

    Bending Method

    I'm thinking that with the plate being grooved, and heated; the bending could be done with a piece of steel, being hammered tight to the bend radius
    ... this to keep the radius tight, and prevent an excessive radius from forming; to leave both elements of the plate flat.

    We do not have access to a high temperature oven.

    Questions

    Can anyone forsee difficulties, or offer advice on the heating and bending, and or the need for further heat treatment (understanding our limitations)?

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    Blacksmithing a sharp inside corner without necking the outside of the bend will require some practice, and a much hotter temperature than you will get from an air/butane torch.

    I would suggest cutting the gage from plate.

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    Agree with the above post. A functional gauge for a student project is a good idea but bending for the angle is going to be difficult and likely disappointing for a student. Sawing out of plate can give a sharp inside corner far easier than bending. Using a file for the angle and inside corner is an easier skill to acquire and allows multiple attempts at getting the angel correct. Bending will likely need to have far more material removed to get the angle correct.

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    I thought I was a professional blacksmith until I did a journeyman/mercenary metals tour at a shop that upset every corner. I knew why it was called upsetting, but after hundreds of various interlocking parts I grasped why it is called upsetting. I think forging would be cooler than any gauge making, but that is off track. go ahead and bend it, acetylene torch with crazy tight and hot heat (cheating but helps) and strike hammer with face slightly down when contacting material, and pulling towards you as it hits. This is not upsetting a corner but will give you a sharp (relative) inside corner. the outside (hammered side) will become thinner and have a radius.
    Have about 1/4 or less of the hammer face overlapping your 'anvil'. Afterwards file, chisel, magic hammer aka grinder are your friends.

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    maybe this for starters?
    YouTube

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    A grinder, even a simple bench grinder would do such a project like a drill angle gauge.. and finish with a file if needed...Someone said hack-saw and a file finish, also a better idea than a blacksmith job.. ..
    Bending .118 x 1.57 inch flat stock is not a very good process.
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 03-17-2020 at 02:33 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Blacksmithing a sharp inside corner ... will require some practice ... I would suggest cutting the gage from plate.
    Quote Originally Posted by AD Design View Post
    ... bending for the angle is going to be difficult and likely disappointing for a student.
    Quote Originally Posted by janvanruth View Post
    maybe this YouTube (training module) for starters?
    Quote Originally Posted by memphisjed View Post
    ... go ahead and bend it, acetylene torch with crazy tight and hot heat
    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    A grinder, even a simple bench grinder would do such a project
    Thank you to everybody for weighing in on this training concept

    While I appreciate that michiganbuck's use of a grinder might be a possibility ... this project is primarily focussed on developing precision engineering skills.
    Ideally, as a 'place it on the desk, and see all eyes go to it'.

    In such a scenario, the gauge must be 'to point'.

    Perhaps, as memphisjed describes, with an oxy-acetylene torch, we might stand a chance.
    However, we do not have access to such a torch, without going out of house.

    I put this project up, to gain considered views, because I knew that the unknown area would be the bending.

    Upon reading the fresh eyes perspectives of gbent and AD Design ... these concerns clarified.
    Clearly, the repercussions were visualised.

    In prototyping, we are naturally gung ho ... it doesn't matter, because everything done is a learning process.

    However, the thought of making the entire gauge (flat) ... an enormous effort ... to have it fail (imagine) ... caused me to seek forewarning.

    AD Design was cock on re 'dissapointing for the student'.
    Hey; and for me.

    Actually; a simple statement of "don't be daft" would have been perfectly within spec

    Sometimes, as intelligent, highly skilled individuals, we can make stupid errors.
    Thankfully, we have a community that can remind us of our fallibility

    Regarding janvanruth's link.
    I found this to be a very good primer.

    Evidently, due to time constraints, much was glossed over.
    However, the instructor knew his stuff.
    Such a pleasure to view a YT vid, where the instructor provides correct basic instruction.
    Such a shame that it's views are incomparable to 'angle grinder' videos.
    Vis a vis 'push listings' ... it does make one think about the wisdom of how well our knowledge distribution is being utilised.

    Hahaha ... but he 'jibbed out' at the gauge angle marking
    You can imagine ... I was very much interested in how this would be achieved.

    That, and the stamping (the horror).

    I'm guilty of crap stamping.
    Hey ... he talked about stamping your entire name.

    I struggled with my initials.

    I have a vice that I made, that I've used almost daily, for decades.
    The only thing that I'm not happy with, is my stamped initials

    For the gauge...
    At this moment in time, I'm thinking to leave it blank.
    Perhaps initials, but probably just blank ... in the hope that the shop where he gets internship, has a lever arm engraver, or some high tech option.

    He simply doesn't have the time to acquire the hand engraving skill (unless someone has a better idea).

    I'm thinking that a square broached guide plate would be ideal, but that would be another project.

    Instead, I'm thinking about the task of joining the cut plates.

    We previously found, what looks like, an aluminium kickstart lever (at the recycling centre).
    At the time, I figured that it must be there for us ... hence we grabbed it (win).

    It can be filed to triangulation.
    This could then form the buttress to the (say) 80 degree angled plate (for the drill bit seats).

    Both gauge plates can then be drilled and chamfered for screws, and the aluminium tapped, to take the screws.
    In this way, both plates can be joined (in a spectacularly beautiful fashion)

    Thanks again for the cautions.

    The gauge plate is now on order - 3 x 40 x 250 mm @ £18.66 delivered.
    That's £8.55 + £7.00 transport + £3.11 VAT.

    He'd better not screw it up


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