Is it generally agreed that safety glasses are a must on the lathe and mill? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    Squirming while you watch a close up of a doctor trying to fish a chip out of an eyeball will clench you right up - and ought to tighten your opinion about the benefit of safety glasses.
    I saw a safety film where they showed a doctor using a high powered magnet to get a chip out of at eye.

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    Safety glasses anywhere in the shop anytime anything is spinning. Had it drilled into me by the shop manager at the university who had a zero-tolerance policy on safety specs. First offense, out of the shop for the day. Second offence and you were done for the semester.

    I'm only that little bit more lax here because I'm the only one in the building making UFOs (unintended flying objects).

    Another thing to take seriously is clippers. I was trimming down some plastic parts at my desk a few years ago and barely registered a black blur coming towards me. Suddenly, I now have what amounts to a grain of nylon glass-fiber-reinforced rice lodged under my lower eyelid. Knowing that panic causes more problems than the problems themselves I calmly walk up to the kitchenette and start rinsing my eyeball. Drew a bit of attention as it was an engineering office so eyeball rinsing is definitely out of the ordinary. When I could still feel it in there I went to the mirror and pulled my eyelid down as far as it would go, and looked up, there it was, sitting right at the corner. I calmly asked for a pair of tweezers from a local bystander and plucked it out, much to my relief and none the worse for wear. Now when I'm holding the dog for nail trimming and my wife goes in for the clip, I reflexively close my eyes when I see her hand squeeze.

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  4. #43
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    When I was working for a workers compensation insurance company in the past, I would review accidents in my general area of work. The most common accidents were eye injuries. Many shops were failing even to provide safety eye wear. One of my jobs was to visit shops and encourage the owners to provide and require safety eye wear.

    One should always wear eye protection when operating metalworking machinery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just a Sparky View Post
    Work gloves are debatable. It depends on the circumstances. Running a straight wire wheel on a bench grinder? Yeah, I definitely want them. They've saved me from a few cumulative weeks of pain and bleeding.
    A friend was doing just that, and one little wire hooked his glove. It wrapped his whole hand up into the wheel until the motor stalled.

    Never, ever wear gloves around rotating equipment, no matter what. Those little nicks and burns are a small price to pay for keeping your hand.

  6. #45
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    Do you really need to ask? WTF....

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    Sign in a place I worked years ago...

    WE CAN SUPPLY SAFETY GLASSES BUT NO EYES

    Dennis

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    Having spent a day in the hospital staring up while a Doctor took a knife to my eyeball to scrape out a metal chip, safety glasses are a must with me. I was lucky then, no reduction in sight, but it could've easily been much worse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DouglasJRizzo View Post
    Having spent a day in the hospital staring up while a Doctor took a knife to my eyeball to scrape out a metal chip, safety glasses are a must with me. I was lucky then, no reduction in sight, but it could've easily been much worse.
    Isn't it great when they pull so hard, they move your eyeball ? "PLEASE KEEP LOOKING AT THE LIGHTBULB SIR"
    Had that Dr. tell me he used "the hockey stick" on me....

    And then there's the "drill"...actually it's laid on the side, and is more of a polishing
    tool. (found out the last time I had it done)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    As I get older I scare myself as I realize I am looking over the top of my subscription glasses to see the tool cutting.
    My father had a sign in the home basement shop. You can get used to safety glasses. You can never get used to a glass eye.
    Bil lD
    This is one of my biggest problems. Due to aging, close up clarity has dropped significantly. However being extremely nearsighted I can see close up looking over my glasses. This is also why I haven't considered Lasik correction. I wouldn't have the clarity at all for close reading, inspection.

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    Neither are directly eyeball related, but a couple things as a kid stuck with me related to general safety around machines.

    When I was in grade school in rural Wisconsin, a friend got wrapped in a PTO shaft and killed. I didn't see it but it made an impression. In high school I occasionally made beer money by helping my father on weekends with autopsies when the regular assistant wasn't available. Standard pay was $100 for about about 2 hours work, in the late 70's. First autopsy I assisted with was a guy who'd tried to use a gasoline tractor to pull out a stuck bulldozer. Tractor flipped on him and gas ignited. You could see his charred thigh bones which I noted in horror to my father, who simply checked the chart and commented that the guy had been admitted to hospital three days prior to dying.

    I've never been risk adverse, motorcycles, training horses, flying single engine IFR. But stupid is stupid, and safety doesn't mean no risk. It means not being stupid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodge View Post
    This is one of my biggest problems. Due to aging, close up clarity has dropped significantly. However being extremely nearsighted I can see close up looking over my glasses. This is also why I haven't considered Lasik correction. I wouldn't have the clarity at all for close reading, inspection.
    I wear contacts for distance correction as I'm terribly near-sighted. Now that I'm old enough, my distance accomodation is also shot, so I need reading glasses for near work. Fortunately, I found a brand of safety glasses I like that come with bifocal-style reading patches. So now I can look up or look down, but I've got Z87+ protection either way.

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    I’ve made two trips to the ER for something embedded in my eye. One was totally random (wind blew some debris in my eye on the street), one was totally my fault (using burr on white gold setting without eye protection, rare lapse).

    Both trips were VERY memorable. First time, doc just flicked it out and that was that. at Bellview hospital around 11 pm in about 1974.

    Second time was the gold sliver, upper west side in the ‘80s, late on a weekend night. Waiting area full, usual suspects, man ranting with bloody shirt wrapped around his hand, ( It’s broken goddamit! I gotta see a doc NOW!).

    Triage nurse asks what is wrong, I calmly say I’ve got a piece of metal stuck in my eye, her eyes got really big, and she says, “right this way!”

    The usual questions, have you had a tetanus shot? I say I’m not worried about it getting infected, they ask why, well that piece of metal was red hot 5 min before I started setting the stone.

    Eye doc on call shows up, “oh yea itÂ’s in there” starts dragging a cotton swab across it ( without anesthetic) Yup, that really f****** hurt..“Well that didnÂ’t do it”

    “Ok, now we are going to have to get serious” unwraps a tool roll.. all kinds of sharp pointy objects, straight out of the torture scene from a movie. Still gives me chills.

    “going to put some astringent drops in, that will numb it slightly”
    Well, thanks buddy.. He says “going wait for that to take” leaves me sitting there staring at the torture implements.. comes back in, “ok here we go” clanking around the tools (clearly this guy was a bit of a sadist).. leans back my head, gets comfortable.. looks in my eye again.. “huh. Looks like the drops loosened it up, I don’t see it.. yep, it’s gone... never been so relieved.

    In retrospect, he might have been fucking with me, and he had gotten it out already..

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    There are 2 kinds of machine tool users: Those who wear safety glasses and those who've been lucky thus far.

    Best Regards,
    Bob

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    Most likely that his daddy taught him to squint with both eyes while turning and milling. Eyeballs are less of a target. The daddy must have told this guy that
    squinting is natural when you get to be a old geiser, so get in the practice early ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    I saw a safety film where they showed a doctor using a high powered magnet to get a chip out of at eye.
    As I write, I have in my Wunderkammer a 'Firlene Eye Magnet/Made by Gowllands in England' should anyone need to borrow it.

    Also, a note upon glass eyes. Decades ago, I built a full-sized fortune teller arcade machine (think "Big") I used a mannikin head and wanted its eyes to move back and forth, so I tried to find a source of glass eyes. I managed to find an ancient local oculist who had a wooden, velvet-lined compartmentalized tray that held 144 eyes--all sorts of sizes, shapes, colors, shades of white, shades of bloodshotedness, etc. I couldn't find two that matched, so I asked him if he had such. He looked at me as though I were a pinhead, and said "Who would ever need TWO glass eyes!"

    Yet I soldiered on, but after 90 seconds or so of staring at a tray that was grossly staring back at me, my stomach did a somersault, and I asked him to pick me out two that were close.

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  22. #56
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    If you want this kid to learn the importance of safety glasses, have him turn some brass or bronze on the lathe without them. I have pile of unknown grade brass I use about once a month. And the red hot chips the size of a grain of sand it makes goes everywhere including down your shirt! The first thing I ever made on a lathe 40 years ago was bronze and I had no glasses on. I learned my lesson very fast after a trip to the emergency room.

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    Yes, without question.

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    I’ve been lucky, only 2 eye surgeries, one I ended up doing myself, embedded shrapnel from exploding refractory, magnet useless, swan Morton scalpel to de skin it, ophthalmology was a fail but I could still damn well feel it, mirror lights action, it came out, relief, fortunately eye drops from hospital in hand
    Second was a bit worse, 9 stitches around eye socket, painful
    No you don’t have to wear glasses, why bother, it’s more fun getting eye surgery, plus this, don’t touch or scratch your eyes without washing your hands!
    I put the swarf in myself, scratching, it was stuck to my hand plus catching the flu is easier if you keep rubbing with dirty paws
    Btw an empty eye socket is an ugly thing, very cringe inducing
    Lathes, glasses always, gloves never
    Mark

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    I've worn safety boots every day of my life for the last 44 years, saved my toes once when I slid on some Diesel when on BSA going down a steep hill in the pouring rain. Toecap was worn through. toes weren't.

    I've only worn safety glasses for 20 odd years. Didn't do that much work which wanted them and the factory didn't insist until then. Since I'm very shortsighted, i've got prescription ones and wear them all the time. I've progressed from reading and distance, to two sets of bifocals to some very good varifocals. I did once get some grinding grit past them and went to the hospital to have it picked out after highlighting it with fluorescein. I've got frames with better side, top and bottom shielding now.

    They have saved one of my eyes.
    I was replacing the zigzag springs in an armchair in the living room and one of them slipped off the retaining clip. These are 24" long springs that are under a tension of about 50lbs. It carved a trench in the right hand lens of my safety glasses and shook me up somewhat. Without them I am completely certain that I wouldn't have that eye any more.

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  27. #60
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    Take him a pair of safety glasses. I have done all sorts of things without protection, I have used a lot of my luck and don't know how much is left.

    I had to get a piece of something removed from my left eye years ago, I had run a abrasive chop saw for 8hr and was in my car to go home and some grit fell off my eyelash in my eye. I couldn't get it out and went to the ER after a 1hr drive home. The dr took a air puffer thing and blew a lot of grit off my eyelashes before he got the FOD out of my eye. It scratched up my eye real bad I still see blurry lines from that one.


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