Is it generally agreed that safety glasses are a must on the lathe and mill? - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 88
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    26,602
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6038

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    ...
    “going to put some astringent drops in, that will numb it slightly”
    Well, thanks buddy.. He says “going wait for that to take” leaves me sitting there staring at the torture implements.. .
    Yep. Second longest two minutes of my life, waiting in the ER room, staring at the single sterile hypodermic needle on the bench, waiting for the doctor.

    I insist on safety glass use now for anyone in my home shop. I had picked up a nail in the car tire a few years ago, my teenage daughter was helping to fix it. (1) there was no jack in the car - big wakeup. (2) got the tire off, removed the nail, got out the plug kit.

    The reamer to clean out the hole and get some rubber cement in there would not go into the hole, the tire was pretty collapsed. So we inflated it a bit, and got the reamer in there and worked it out a bit. She removed the reamer and (surprise) a jet of rubber cement shot out right into her eye. (fok says I, a trip to the ER today) and when all was said and done, she had neat smear of dried rubber cement right across her closed eyelid. Reaction times *that* fast.

    Now, glasses are mandatory for anyone working in the shop, anytime.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    70
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    Were I used to work, (retired now). No glasses, 1st time caught you geta warning, 2nd 2 days off no pay 3rd time 1 week off no pay, 4th time fired. End of story

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    10,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    572
    Likes (Received)
    8311

    Default

    It can be so hard to make employees wear safety glasses.
    All those safety videos and nasty pictures have very little effect.
    One has to turn it into a habit. That takes time and effort.
    Bob

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    32
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    It can be so hard to make employees wear safety glasses.
    All those safety videos and nasty pictures have very little effect.
    One has to turn it into a habit. That takes time and effort.
    Bob
    The contractors at my plant have one shot, get caught without PPE and get canned


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    5,835
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    205
    Likes (Received)
    1999

    Default

    I am not going to comment on the safety glasses issue. They are eye savers. Period!

    But I have to say something about wearing gloves: to me, gloves anywhere near a machine with a rotating spindle are a danger. Just look at the photos and videos of people who got wound up in a machine.



    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    I was speaking with a young guy in a shop near mine who is just starting out on the lathe.
    I stopped by the shop and he was busy making a part and no safety glasses.
    I know his dad works in machining so just asked sort of offhand if his dad had talked to him about safety.
    He said yes his dad had squared him away with dos and don’t practice.

    I’m surprised- I never go anywhere near a lathe or mill without safety glasses.

    One hit chip in the eye and that’s it- you might not get past the damage.
    This guy isn’t my employee but I hate to see people putting themselves at risk.
    But- I’m not real experienced with how things roll in manufacturing.
    I am just rolling along with what I figured out in my own shop.

    What’s the deal- everyone think safety glasses are required in the lathe?
    Not management putting stickers on machines- what really happens.
    Safety glasses or not so much.

    One thing the kid did say- in his last job management made everyone wear gloves when using the drill press- weird.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    6,802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1165
    Likes (Received)
    3810

    Default

    When I was...18 or so, I started in a shop and was running a DoAll bandsaw. The saw were always kept in top shape with high quality, sharp blades. I had on those canvas and leather Blue Mule leather gloves, and the teeth cuaght one and started to pull my hand in, fast. Luckily, I had good reflexes still, and the glove was ratty, so I pulled back hard and the gloves ripped apart. That was my learning experience!

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,374
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3507
    Likes (Received)
    682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    I was speaking with a young guy in a shop near mine who is just starting out on the lathe.
    I stopped by the shop and he was busy making a part and no safety glasses.
    I know his dad works in machining so just asked sort of offhand if his dad had talked to him about safety.
    He said yes his dad had squared him away with dos and don’t practice.

    I’m surprised- I never go anywhere near a lathe or mill without safety glasses.

    One hit chip in the eye and that’s it- you might not get past the damage.
    This guy isn’t my employee but I hate to see people putting themselves at risk.
    But- I’m not real experienced with how things roll in manufacturing.
    I am just rolling along with what I figured out in my own shop.

    What’s the deal- everyone think safety glasses are required in the lathe?
    Not management putting stickers on machines- what really happens.
    Safety glasses or not so much.

    One thing the kid did say- in his last job management made everyone wear gloves when using the drill press- weird.
    Yep safety glasses are a must do. Gloves around any machine running are not good. Even running a CNC and closing the doors can have issues if someone instinctively might forget they are wearing them and almost acting in reflex.

    I do not wear gloves and measure parts ever unless I might use a tape measure for something. I have had a couple of times where a chip got into my eye badly. I learned something each time basically that even when wearing them the chips can and do come over and under safety glasses. The quality and close fit of them are critical and so I never left it to what a employer might just provide. Most of the time they are cheaply made.

    I have seen too where shops encouraged everyone to buy their own and made it mandatory for employees to choose their own. Who paid how much was always secretive as these could approach $500.00 easy yet they were very fly.

    Gloves,long sleeves, loose clothing all of it is dangerous and I always wear a cap and use the bill as a shield over the top of my safety glasses. Also I buy antifog lens cleaner and have a couple of new pair in the toolbox to use.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    4,683
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2313
    Likes (Received)
    2906

    Default

    Speaking of which- what safety glasses folks using?

    I am using some pretty basic/cheap ones but they do have small side shields- yeah- I wear a baseball cap and tuck my head down a bit when chips are really flying.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,374
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3507
    Likes (Received)
    682

    Default

    Nuevo by 3M are good for me.

    3M Nuvo Safety Glasses, Clear Anti-Fog Lens| Rockler Woodworking and Hardware

    They are spec for OSHA. This one is likely not the best price if you shop them. I know the link says woodworking and they would work ok for that yet they are right for either.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    227
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    89
    Likes (Received)
    62

    Default

    Case in point I was doing some turning tonight and had a nice heavy curly-Q spring off and strike my safety glasses squarely in front of my left eye.

    I don't think anything more needs to be said.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    what safety glasses folks using?
    I'm in love with the Pyramex Iteks. They're comfy. Most safety glasses bug me but I love those so much I buy them by the dozen. Don't know what I'll do if they ever stop making them.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    19

    Default

    We used to ban contacts under safety glasses if someone was using chemicals. Seems to make sense. Chemicals get under the contacts and you can not get them out. Then a study was actually done and, looking at various accidents, they discovered that contacts under safety glasses was safer with chemical splashes than no contacts.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    6,802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1165
    Likes (Received)
    3810

    Default

    I've never understood safety glass discussions.....they all seem centered around 'generic' safety glasses and ignore the need for prescription lenses....when a huge number of people wear glasses.

  13. Likes Trueturning, CAMasochism liked this post
  14. #73
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,374
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3507
    Likes (Received)
    682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I've never understood safety glass discussions.....they all seem centered around 'generic' safety glasses and ignore the need for prescription lenses....when a huge number of people wear glasses.
    You are right. These online outfits who make good safety glasses (build your own) are great. Prescription lenses are no problems. Hope you are fine there in Texas my friend don’t mind the haters during the big storm.

    I found when I started to need glasses at work I had not a clue my eyesight was going at around age 40. Funny too a friend in QC gave me a print and told me to read it and proved to me that I has vision issues. He told me that for vanity’s sake I was being in denial about the whole need to get checked. I managed well with readers and a couple of years later prescription glasses. I still had to use readers and bifocal readers because nothing I saw at vision centers protected my eyes as the chips had wide spaces to get into my eye.

    Zen i does great yet they are expensive. They protect the eyes well and for a machinist they should have access to proper safety glasses as a right I believe. If a company is unable to help with that then so be it.

    Maybe it should be supported on a government level then. Workers at the very least should have access to OSHA approved safety equipment. After all these are people’s eyes. Since employers should be concerned when they hire people they need to be diligent enforcing compliance and making it easier for their employees to use them.

    A employer tolerating scratched up company bought junk should change their whole outlook. When someone blows out a eye then that costs in society regardless of if the person was stupid or not to get hurt.

    Believe me a company can ride here on a complete transformation in a company to enforce it. I have instituted those measures myself.

  15. Likes GregSY liked this post
  16. #74
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    4,683
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2313
    Likes (Received)
    2906

    Default

    Same guy today- 1/16" cut wheel chopping 3/16"x3" channel with a right angle grinder using the squint method.
    Sparks and debris flying everywhere and I don't want to be within 20'.
    Oh well- this is just how the guy rolls..

  17. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    10,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    572
    Likes (Received)
    8311

    Default

    Safety glasses, who needs stinking safety eye-wear..
    Bob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_20170408_183228_865.jpg  

  18. #76
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,244
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    696
    Likes (Received)
    718

    Default

    This one isn't about safety glasses of the normal kind but about protective glasses used around laser markers and/or cutters. I was responsible for designing and building production laser markers for bone screws. Fiber laser from Trumpf. It was mandatory to wear protective glasses around this machine as well as the windows being laser protected. Our safety manager asked me to find a video or pictures that would reinforce the point to always wear eye protection when working on this machine. I found pictures of an eye that had been struck with a beam. The front of the eye looked normal but as the pictures pulled back, it showed that the eye had exploded. The beam enters the eye and makes the liquid boil and turn to steam thus creating a mess. He showed these during a plant wide safety meeting. Needless to say a few people walked out and we never heard a peep about people not wearing protective glasses.

    Another aspect of working with lasers. If it strikes your skin, it might look like a pin prick on the outside. Inside though is where the real damage takes place. The point being to NOT take it for granted.

    Paul

  19. Likes dalmatiangirl61 liked this post
  20. #77
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    AR, USA
    Posts
    1,017
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ksimolo View Post
    We used to ban contacts under safety glasses if someone was using chemicals. Seems to make sense. Chemicals get under the contacts and you can not get them out. Then a study was actually done and, looking at various accidents, they discovered that contacts under safety glasses was safer with chemical splashes than no contacts.
    Is it safe to assume that you then started requiring contacts be worn under safety glasses while working with chemicals?

  21. #78
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    19

    Default

    In some respects, that would have been the logical thing to do

    But since we require full goggles if working with significant amounts of dangerous materials, it would not be any safer. But it was very surprising that they were found to be safe.

  22. #79
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    1,742
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    77
    Likes (Received)
    1006

    Default

    I rarely wear safety glasses at the lathe normally because I wear prescription glasses and usually am doing smaller jobs at slow speeds. The exception is when high RPMs are involved, which for me is rarely the case. However, if I am running a 13" inch lathe at high RPMs, then I would wear safety glasses as an added measure of protection. If I did not wear glasses, I would wear safety glasses for any operation where I thought there was a danger to the eye. I do not believe in wearing various items of safety gear blindly no matter what. I think employees should make intelligent decisions about safety and wear appropriate gear where a real threat exists. Wearing gear when no real threat exists or imagining threats to exist when the chance of it is negligible I think is a bad practice. Some people will imagine fantasy scenarios that are 1 in a billion and use such imaginations to justify various pieces of gear and I think that shows a poor mentality. The equipment should match the operation. The only employees I have had who have injured themselves in the past (not at my shop) are not-so-coincidentally the same ones who use excessive amounts of safety gear. Nowadays, if I see an employee who is paranoid about safety and wearing glasses, hats and gloves everywhere, I get rid of them.

    Generally I advise the use of glasses only when high RPMS are involved, or it is a big machine with a lot of energy.

    My experience with stuff getting in peoples' eyes is that it is usually happening because they are doing something stupid. Once I had neighbor get something in his eye because he was doing something stupid with a grinder. My feeling about this is that it is better to teach workers how not to do stupid stuff, than to try to armor them up against stupidity. No amount of protective gear in the world will protect your workers when they are doing something dumb. Furthermore, nearly every serious accident I can think of offhand would not have been helped by safety gear. In fact, most of the accidents I know happened in other shops because the guy was wearing too much stuff.

    In my own shop I have never had an accident and the reason for that I watch everything that happens and never allow bad practices or risky behaviors to arise.

  23. #80
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    19

    Default

    I only buy prescription glasses as safety glasses, usually with removable side shields so I can wear them when out in public.

    Safety glasses are not meant as the first line of defense. They are worn as backup because unexpected stuff happens and people have brain farts. I can not imagine totally unprotected eyes in a shop. Even more so if someone else is also working in the shop - you have no control over what they do.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •