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    Default Gloves

    Today, after several hours of machining mild steel using a fine rougher I got a stubborn little curly steel hair into my finger. It wasn't too deep but it took some work to get it out because it curled-up as it went into the skin. I had to use an x-acto knife to open things up just a tiny bit to be able go grab the thread and get it out.

    Anyhow, no big deal, it did, however, make me think about gloves. I wore two types today, a thick disposable "mechanics" glove for about half the job and leather gloves for the rest. I also handled steel bare-handed a bunch of times. I have no clue when the little steel hair went into my finger. I only noticed it later while typing (it was in my pinky).

    What do you guys recommend for gloves to protect from this kind of thing?

    Someone is bound to suggest I need to develop callouses. I am not a full time machinist or metal worker, that's unlikely to happen and not desirable in my case.


    -Martin

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    Quote Originally Posted by martin_05 View Post
    Today, after several hours of machining mild steel using a fine rougher I got a stubborn little curly steel hair into my finger. It wasn't too deep but it took some work to get it out because it curled-up as it went into the skin. I had to use an x-acto knife to open things up just a tiny bit to be able go grab the thread and get it out.

    Anyhow, no big deal, it did, however, make me think about gloves. I wore two types today, a thick disposable "mechanics" glove for about half the job and leather gloves for the rest. I also handled steel bare-handed a bunch of times. I have no clue when the little steel hair went into my finger. I only noticed it later while typing (it was in my pinky).

    What do you guys recommend for gloves to protect from this kind of thing?

    Someone is bound to suggest I need to develop callouses. I am not a full time machinist or metal worker, that's unlikely to happen and not desirable in my case.


    -Martin
    No gloves within 3' of a rotating spindle.

    Hobby or Paid, we all break the same way.

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    Gloves = lost fingers or worst near a spinning object

    I use the cheapest rubber gloves when dealing with fluids because they break just putting them on so they wont pull me in.

    If you want a good way to remove splinters, use the plier type toe nail cutters. They allow you to dig deep and cut at the same time.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Edit: No gloves near rotating spindles.

    Otherwise, I like open cuff leather gloves, like TIG gloves for general use, like handling sharp stuff while I'm deburring it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
    Gloves = lost fingers or worst near a spinning object

    I use the cheapest rubber gloves when dealing with fluids because they break just putting them on so they wont pull me in.

    If you want a good way to remove splinters, use the plier type toe nail cutters. They allow you to dig deep and cut at the same time.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    I keep a stack of neodymium magnets in a little plastic bottle at my workbench for pulling out metal spinters. Works great on eyes and on hands if the metal hasn't really bedded in.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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    These are great when you're not working around moving parts
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00D3...b_b_asin_title

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    I bought my wife a food slicer, ans she did get sliced by one 50 years ago working in a restaurant, but in amazon while pricing them I noticed that they sell chain mail gloves for use while using one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by martin_05 View Post
    What do you guys recommend ...
    Toughen up. Real machinists smooth their fingers out on the grinder before a date, so you won't ruin the girl's nylons. Use coolant if you can.

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    Gloves are PPE, no different from eye protection, hearing protection or steel-toed boots.

    I wear gloves virtually all the time in the shop- to the point where it doesn't quite feel "right" to not wear them.

    I still have all ten fully-functional fingers, all ten nails, no significant scars, etc. thanks to the one simple precept- I keep my hands away from the spinny stuff.

    The black nitrile gloves have saved me from hundreds of very similar steel splinters, as well as the occasional sharp edge and even an errant Xacto once or twice.

    I'll wear leather gloves when handling sheetmetal and other sharp or dirty material, if I have to grind something, etc. I'll wear heavy gauntlets for stick welding and light leathers for TIG welding. I wear soft cotton for buffing, heavy plastic for cleaning things in solvents, and thin latex for painting.

    And I go through a box of black nitriles about every month to six weeks or so. On the mill, on the lathe, on the surface grinder, especially on the turret lathe- with it's flood cutting oil- on the CNC, at the drill press, etc.

    Never been injured because I'm not so colossally stupid as to try and grab the chuck or the drill or the endmill or the grinding wheel or whatever. Those things can't leap out and grab you- you have to reach in to them. Any injury was not 'caused' by the glove, it was caused by the idiot sticking his hand where it shouldn't have been.

    But, thanks to regular glove use, I have no callouses, no cuts- I've used exactly one band aid so far this year, I slipped with an air sander while wearing the wrong glove- and at the end of a day after soaking my hands in WD-40 or cutting oil or greasy solvent or whatever, I peel 'em off, wash my hands with a little regular soap and hot water, and I'm ready to eat.

    Gloves are intended to protect your hands just as goggles are intended to protect your eyes and muffs are intended to protect your ears. Use the right gloves for the right application, and you'll be fine.

    Doc.

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    That's nice, but accidents happen. The old "I'm safe so I can't get hurt" only goes so far.

    The old truths are still truths....no gloves.

    I also don't wear them near saw blades, not just spindles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    No gloves within 3' of a rotating spindle.
    Why would I wear gloves near a rotating spindle? In fact, why would my hands be anywhere near a rotating spindle?

    This happened while handling parts before/after machining. No way for the spindle to spin-up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Toughen up. Real machinists smooth their fingers out on the grinder before a date, so you won't ruin the girl's nylons. Use coolant if you can.
    I knew someone would go there. Some of us are not inclined to destroy our hands. I understand the bravado. Appreciate it, really. Not for me. Thanks.

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    Every manual, new and old forbids gloves around machinery.

    It doesn’t have to spin to get you in a predicament.

    Ever noticed on some of the used machinery for sale there’s giant warnings posted reading

    “ABSOLUTELY NO GLOVES WHEN USING THIS MACHINE”

    If a loom of thread jumps off the lathe and catches a glove it very well may end up pulling you in, loose clothes have caught the end of the spindle (opposite the chuck) and crushed men to death, lead screws have wound (parts of) men up just ask Adam savage.

    It’s all about safety, “it was going good, until it went bad”

    No one sees “it” coming.

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    Quote Originally Posted by martin_05 View Post
    I understand the bravado.
    If you're really tough, you don't bother with shoes ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    If you're really tough, you don't bother with shoes ...
    I wore boat shoes with no socks welding ONCE, bad mistake.

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    The Toft brothers were sugar cane farmers and started the Toft Cane Harvester business,neither ever wore shoes in their lives ,and could walk on milling chips without noticing.

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    You couldn't pay me enough to wear gloves of any type around rotating things in the shop. NO THANKS!. I have all my fingers and plan to keep them.

    Look up some of the photos of the accidents if you must. It only takes a second or less.

    I have pulled a number of steel and other types of splinters from my fingers. Key idea here is that my fingers are still there to pick up those splinters. Magnifier, X-Acto knife, sharpened tweezers, alcohol pads and bottle, and bandages: all standard shop supplies. I am a pretty good one handed splinter surgeon. The hard part is holding the magnifier in the needed position.

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    I don't use gloves when machining. I tend to use gloves when handling steel stock, especially the square stuff.

    Of late I've developed the habit of always using nitrile gloves when cleaning or degreasing with solvents. Now I'm into my 60s It takes much longer for my skin to recover from being degreased.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    That's nice, but accidents happen. The old "I'm safe so I can't get hurt" only goes so far.
    -Yes, yes, that's the common response. "It hasn't hurt you YET, therefore stop using them while you can!" or some such supercilious twaddle.

    No, sorry. That's like saying I can go without safety glasses because I haven't taken a splinter straight to the cornea yet.

    I make my living with my hands, both as a machinist and an artist. Gloves are designed to protect your hands. Gloves do not themselves have some kind of magnetic attraction to rotating devices- YOU, the glove wearer does that.

    If YOU keep your hands away from the spinny bits, it doesn't matter if you're wearing leather gloves, opera gloves, hockey gloves or your Michael Jackson Signature Edition Sequined Glove.

    Gloves have saved me- as they're designed to do- from countless cuts, abrasions, burns, sparks, slivers, slices and pokes, as well as countless doses of solvents, paints, oils, sprays and any manner of other noxious fluids.

    And of course have caused no injury of their own, because I don't go running my fingers into sawblades, try to stop heavy drills by grabbing the chuck, or try to grab the part in the lathe for some reason, while it's still spinning. In short, I'm not an idiot.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Ever noticed on some of the used machinery for sale there’s giant warnings posted reading “ABSOLUTELY NO GLOVES WHEN USING THIS MACHINE”
    -The more relevant one is "This Machine Has No Brain, Use Your Own".

    If a loom of thread jumps off the lathe and catches a glove it very well may end up pulling you in[.]
    -Entirely possible. In that case, it can catch your bare hand as easily as it catches a glove- which is why you try to prevent the condition, not pointlessly ban an item of PPE.

    lead screws have wound (parts of) men up just ask Adam savage.
    -Savage was wearing no gloves of any kind, and still got injured, because he stupidly stuck his hand into rotating machinery. Is that really the point you wanted to make here?

    Doc.

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