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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by martin_05 View Post
    I knew someone would go there. Some of us are not inclined to destroy our hands. I understand the bravado. Appreciate it, really. Not for me. Thanks.
    I'm guessing you're a professional fluffer?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Toughen up. Real machinists smooth their fingers out on the grinder before a date, so you won't ruin the girl's nylons. Use coolant if you can.
    Coolant?

    Oy! Now there's a palate-teaser for yah reminiscent of a frine Kalifornikyah vintage row-say whine in a cardboard carton!



    I'd suggest - if even she NEEDS it - she'd be a great DEAL more cooperative with Astroglide... naif



    As to the embedded slivers?

    "AAA" Swiss-pattern tweezers, also the diagonal ones Sushi chefs use to de-bone and de-worm fish... and most of all damned good lighting, not less than 8 X magnifier.

    And plenty of Peroxide and other good antiseptics.

    Folk with challenged immune systems can actually LOSE a finger to infection that wouldn't be any sort of issue atall to the average person.
    .
    Slip-on "finger cot" - the SHORT ones - can be safer than gloves.

    Coating the finger pads with a peelable plastic works well, too.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    Gloves are PPE, no different from eye protection, hearing protection or steel-toed boots. I wear gloves virtually all the time in the shop- to the point where it doesn't quite feel "right" to not wear them.


    A friend of a friend shared your opinion. Then an errant wire on the wire wheel caught his glove and wrapped up his hand.

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    Lathe operator I knew 10 years ago.

    40+ years of experience, mostly one-off jobs, repair jobs etc etc. Skilled and sober, very good machinist.

    Made ONE mistake. Gloves. Strip of sandpaper. And big diameter stock - so the jaws were protruding from spindle.

    Started to polish the stock with sandpaper strip. Spindle grabbed glove. Ripped the thumb of along with 30cm of ligaments, up to elbow. Basically splitted the forearm.

    Injured so badly that couple weeks later had a heart attack and RIP.

    So, destiny is gruel. The poor guy was already half-retired and planned to go to full retirement in 1-2 years.

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    Sorry to inform the uninformed without claiming to be their father ( found that funny, I am your father thing) I had the misfortune of being what we called in the steelplant a first responder, I got 3 nitrile glove accidents, all involving big 80 grit horizontal disk sanders for samples, all gloves caught and pulled fingers onto disk, 1 belt sander accident, same MO.
    They are strong enough to pull your pinkeys in, no question about it, they may break but the microsecond they are pulling is more than enough for the unwanted attention of a rotating machine
    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by boslab View Post
    Sorry to inform the uninformed without claiming to be their father ( found that funny, I am your father thing) I had the misfortune of being what we called in the steelplant a first responder, I got 3 nitrile glove accidents, all involving big 80 grit horizontal disk sanders for samples, all gloves caught and pulled fingers onto disk, 1 belt sander accident, same MO.
    They are strong enough to pull your pinkeys in, no question about it, they may break but the microsecond they are pulling is more than enough for the unwanted attention of a rotating machine
    Mark
    Yabutt ! Alloy Mcgraw sez that common sense shows Nitrile gloves to be safe....

    Right Cheer:
    "Why not answer with Nitrile like one poster did?

    Tons of machinists use them. Nitrile glove accidents aren't sweeping the nation.

    I think people get ridiculous with safety, instead of being logical about it."
    The Logical Song - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I think people get ridiculous with safety, instead of being logical about it."
    "Logical" to me is "many, many" type of gloves used for all MANNER of stuff.

    But OFF they come when running grinder/buffer/wire, lathe, mill, or drillpress.

    No exceptions.

    That IS why we wear them rather than growing them like a horse's hoof, after all!



    Got my share of scars, clear to the bone 5 of 8 fingers and one of 2 thumbs.

    But they all healed.

    And they are all still attached and fully functional.

    Works for me.. so far.... 77th year and counting.

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  12. #48
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    [quote]
    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    I’ve had nitrile gloves catch on a 1HP drain snake MULTIPLE TIMES and wrap my hand up.
    -So the glove somehow caused you to grab rotating machinery?!?

    [...]but my point was that IF a lead screw catches you, your cloths, your gloves, Etc it won’t be pleasant.
    -On your lathes, can the lead screw whip out like a cobra and grab an unwary passersby?

    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    A friend of a friend shared your opinion. Then an errant wire on the wire wheel caught his glove and wrapped up his hand.
    -At what point did the glove cause the fellow to jam his hand into rotating machinery?

    Made ONE mistake. Gloves. Strip of sandpaper. And big diameter stock - so the jaws were protruding from spindle.
    -Again, at which point did the glove cause the fellow to get his hand too close to rotating equipment?

    Quote Originally Posted by boslab View Post
    I got 3 nitrile glove accidents[...]
    -So in each case, the glove is what caused the fellow to slip his hand into the disc? Calling it a "glove accident" is like calling a shooting a "bullet accident".

    None of these cases were the fault of or caused by gloves. That's the point I keep trying to make here. Adam Savage, in an earlier note, got badly injured when he was cleaning the leadscrew on his lathe, by letting it run, and wrapping it with cloth. No gloves involved, he was injured because he put his hands into rotating machinery.

    Every example given here is exactly the same- the glove didn't cause it, the wearer caused it by putting his hands, accidentally or intentionally, into rotating machinery.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    Every example given here is exactly the same- the glove didn't cause it, the wearer caused it by putting his hands, accidentally or intentionally, into rotating machinery.
    Sure. But there's a difference between getting a nasty cut and having your thumb ripped off.

    Although I've got a chinese Owner, so who am I to lecture people on safety ...

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    [QUOTE=DocsMachine;3776956]

    -So the glove somehow caused you to grab rotating machinery?!?



    -On your lathes, can the lead screw whip out like a cobra and grab an unwary passersby?



    -At what point did the glove cause the fellow to jam his hand into rotating machinery?



    -Again, at which point did the glove cause the fellow to get his hand too close to rotating equipment?



    -So in each case, the glove is what caused the fellow to slip his hand into the disc? Calling it a "glove accident" is like calling a shooting a "bullet accident".

    None of these cases were the fault of or caused by gloves. That's the point I keep trying to make here. Adam Savage, in an earlier note, got badly injured when he was cleaning the leadscrew on his lathe, by letting it run, and wrapping it with cloth. No gloves involved, he was injured because he put his hands into rotating machinery.

    Every example given here is exactly the same- the glove didn't cause it, the wearer caused it by putting his hands, accidentally or intentionally, into rotating machinery.

    Doc.
    One wonders..... if we might be blessed with "The Wisdom According to Doc"

    .. as to the dangerous combinations of:

    - pubic hair and re-rolling condoms...

    - scrotums and zippers...

    - long-drop testicles and hinged toilet seats..

    - lower-flying aircraft and higher-flying mountains..

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    Quote Originally Posted by martin_05 View Post
    Today, after several hours of machining mild steel using a fine rougher I got a stubborn little curly steel hair into my finger. It wasn't too deep but it took some work to get it out because it curled-up as it went into the skin. I had to use an x-acto knife to open things up just a tiny bit to be able go grab the thread and get it out.

    Anyhow, no big deal, it did, however, make me think about gloves. I wore two types today, a thick disposable "mechanics" glove for about half the job and leather gloves for the rest. I also handled steel bare-handed a bunch of times. I have no clue when the little steel hair went into my finger. I only noticed it later while typing (it was in my pinky).

    What do you guys recommend for gloves to protect from this kind of thing?

    Someone is bound to suggest I need to develop callouses. I am not a full time machinist or metal worker, that's unlikely to happen and not desirable in my case.


    -Martin

    At the CNC machining program in Tech school, gloves were not allowed when using the manual machine tools.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    At the CNC machining program in Tech school, gloves were not allowed when using the manual machine tools.
    Only on "all manual". eh?

    One hopes that food preparation, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Proctology, and Forensics Pathology courses have different rules?

    Or at least are not taught as a consolidated course?


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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Only on "all manual". eh?

    One hopes that food preparation, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Proctology, and Forensics Pathology courses have different rules?

    Or at least are not taught as a consolidated course?

    LOL. Gloves

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Sure. But there's a difference between getting a nasty cut and having your thumb ripped off.
    -Yessir. And in the rare case of a too-heavy weight crushing the steel-toe cap and amputating the toes, we must state unequivocally that you must not wear steel-toe boots anywhere, at any time, for any reason, around heavy weights?

    That's the absurdity I'm hearing here with those stating an outright ban on gloves.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post

    1-So the glove somehow caused you to grab rotating machinery?!?



    2-On your lathes, can the lead screw whip out like a cobra and grab an unwary passersby?


    Doc.
    Jesus your daft, do as you wish. No one here cares if you get mauled or not we just don’t want to see it happen.

    1: you clearly don’t know how a drain auger works, in order to guide the cable you have to man handle it by hand while it’s running and the cable can/will pinch your nitrile gloves and wrap your hand/arm right the F*#K up in a heart beat.

    I would wear thick gloves to avoid it pinching but occasionally it still would.
    Drain augers that size have a deadman switch for issues like this.


    2: a lead screw can catch a loose shirt/belt/hair/pants/hand/rag/GLOVES or any number of things that it wants to, as you said “this machine had no brain, so use yours”

    I suggest you take that to heart.

    I would NOT “ban” gloves outright, I never stopped wearing them when clearing drains, I always wear them when cleaning with chemicals.

    In the split second knee jerk reaction to yank your hand out of danger gloves can make the difference between learning a lesson VS learning to write with your other hand

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    “That's like saying I can go without safety glasses because I haven't taken a splinter straight to the cornea yet.“
    incorrect, that’s not an accurate comparison, gloves have their places, safety spectacles also have their place.

    It’s more like saying “don’t wear full firefighter gear while running a lathe”
    Or “don’t wear a parachute while deep sea diving”

    Everything has a time/place



    Ps you forgot to load pictures of your lathe this time around

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Only on "all manual". eh?

    One hopes that food preparation, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Proctology, and Forensics Pathology courses have different rules?

    Or at least are not taught as a consolidated course?


    Well the CNC turning and machining centers won't run unless the door is closed. Though there is a way to defeat that, but only needed to use it once, to use emory paper to put a fine finish on some candlestick holders.

    We started on manual surface grinders then automatic, and didn't use gloves with them either. Wouldn't have mattered on the automatic since we just set the values and then hurry up and wait for it to do its thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    1: you clearly don’t know how a drain auger works, in order to guide the cable you have to man handle it by hand while it’s running and the cable can/will pinch your nitrile gloves and wrap your hand/arm right the F*#K up in a heart beat.
    -I don't doubt it. But how is that a condition caused by the glove? It seems equally, if not more so, dangerous to use with a bare hand?

    2: a lead screw can catch a loose shirt/belt/hair/pants/hand/rag/GLOVES or any number of things that it wants to[.]
    -So, to apply the same logic of "no gloves, ever", we must therefore never wear shirts, belts or pants, and never use our hands.

    And apparently I'm the daft one.

    I suggest you take that to heart.
    -Actually, I have. I've been welding and using a gas axe since I was 14, bought my first machine tool in 1994, and been a full-time machinist for twenty-three years now. I still have all ten fully-functioning fingers, all with fully intact nails, I've never so much as needed a single stitch, I use between one and two band-aids a year, and the worst scar I possess is a 3/8" long one at the base of my right thumb, from a bit of sharp sheetmetal in my high school metals class.

    I was told, when welding, not to pick up the hot things, and when machining, to not grab the spinny things. That's served me pretty well over the years.

    In the split second knee jerk reaction to yank your hand out of danger gloves can make the difference between learning a lesson VS learning to write with your other hand[.]
    -Yessir. I am, however, still unclear on how or why that means I should use no gloves on the milling machine (where my hands are generally some twenty inches away from the spinny bits when they are spinning) or the lathe (where, depending on which one I'm using, anywhere from six inches to three feet from the whirly parts) or the bandsaw (which is amply supplied with push sticks and other fixtures) or the drill press, or whatever else I might be playing with.

    Your machine, for some reason, requires you to use it in a dangerous manner. My milling machine, on the other hand, has its handwheels mounted well away from the spindle- ditto the lathe. I rarely, if ever, find the need to attempt to grab the workpiece while it's moving, in much the same way I'm rarely driven to try to grab the leadscrew, sniff the headstock or lick the reversing gears.

    [...]gloves have their places[...]
    -Yessir, and apparently we disagree on where and when. You use them on a machine that requires the use of a deadman switch, because it requires you to grab rotating machinery.

    I use them on machines where one virtually never has to touch the rotary bits while they're in motion, and as such, they add effectively zero additional danger, and conversely, a good deal of additional safety.

    [...]you forgot to load pictures of your lathe this time around[.]
    -I don't have a new one you guys haven't already seen. I passed up a nice 12" Logan the other day, though....

    Doc.

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    There’s no doubt nitrile gloves will break, but they can give you a little tug in the wrong direction, the machines that had them ( herzog twin disk sample preparation grinder) had a notice to not use gloves, use glasses and no loose clothing sign, the gloves bit was ignored, the lady and gentlemen involved did not want dirty hands, gloves are worn for nearly everything in met labs
    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    I’ve had nitrile gloves catch on a 1HP drain snake MULTIPLE TIMES and wrap my hand up.

    when using a drain snake it’s either you play in the poop or you wear gloves.

    Let me tell you RIGHT NOW that nitrile WILL FOR SURE wrap up and yank your hand in.

    You have no idea how strong nitrile is when it tears and winds up.

    It will definitely pull you in.

    Sometimes circumstances require you to work with spinning equipment.

    I seen a video doc about a man who reached into a sheet metal press to flick the part out and his glove caught, he lost his hand.

    I DONT CARE IF YOU WANT TO LIVE HOWEVER YOU WANT. I’m not talking anyone how to live and I wouldn’t want anyone telling me.

    All I was saying is there’s a standard most follow FOR REASON.

    Don’t follow it, no skin off my back jack.
    “ Don’t follow it, no skin off my back jack.”

    The thing is I might have to see when a accident happens to someone easily offended by the whole regimen of established Safety practices. They are very set and based on empirical knowledge.

    I dislike a careless person and do not feel safe around them and I do not like helping such a hard head when they injure themselves knowing they refused to listen like everyone else when told what was required.

    I will hurt someone’s feeling over it if they want to start trouble over it. I have seen people ready to fight over the issue even. The first time someone almost gets injured in some way they should learn from it and change. Plus we need to learn from what happens to others too. Nothing wrong with safety requirements.

    Don’t like them - start your own shop. Don’t expect anyone to agree with lax safety measures in such a shop either. So I suppose what happens here is someone says the gloves are safe and others say they are not and those cite examples of them being unsafe.

    I do not think anyone is lying about ideal safety measures and their experiences with them. I try to keep a open mind and side with safety where I can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Smoked frog ? Never had it that way. There's a dish the Assistant likes and I don't mind, big frog in a sort of broth with a bazillion red peppers and some lotus roots and bamboo slices and other stuff (no doufu, thank god), not too bad. If you eat enough of the peppers it can fry your head
    “ If you eat enough of the peppers it can fry your head ”

    Is that what happened to you? Too many peppers with frog meal? Is that why you hop to conclusions and croak things over?

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