Going south while unloading a Cincinnati 202-12
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 62
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    North Carolina
    Posts
    17
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default Going south while unloading a Cincinnati 202-12

    Hello,

    So as the title says things went to hell today while unloading our 202-12 off our trailer with a forklift. I was trying to get it closer to the side of the trailer to get more of the forks under the mill when I'm not sure exactly what happened but it ended with the base of the mill on the trailer and the rest on my driveway. Plenty of superficial damage and broken handles what I'm trying to determine is the extent. I had all the ways locked down for better or worse and my cursory look at them didn't show any major damage. The variable speed switch is broken and will not move. The spindle will extend about 2 inches and then seems to jam. I haven't tried pushing it hard because I didn't want to break anything more. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I'm really hoping I didn't just destroy our mill along with our trailer. Thanks for any help or suggestions,

    TwinDad

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    740
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    590
    Likes (Received)
    603

    Default

    Suck up the loss and have it professionally done next time. I'm sure the cost of the damage done will far outweigh the cost of having it done for you.

  3. Likes tdmidget, BT Fabrication, chet liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    6,624
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10477
    Likes (Received)
    3162

    Default

    Good job!!!!!

  5. Likes crazygoat, digger doug liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    20,176
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Steel forks bearing directly on the steel underside of the machine ?

    slippery at best.

  7. Likes Hardplates, GregSY liked this post
  8. #5
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,638
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    824
    Likes (Received)
    1002

    Default

    Sounds like a classic case of dirty muffler bearings.

    Did you try hitting it with a hammer?

    Judging by the vast amount of details you've provided I'm gonna say the bigger hammer route is your best bet.

  9. Likes digger doug, Garwood, Mtndew liked this post
  10. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    20,176
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    Sounds like a classic case of dirty muffler bearings.

    Did you try hitting it with a hammer?

    Judging by the vast amount of details you've provided I'm gonna say the bigger hammer route is your best bet.
    Shirley we could work in some "Light hydrocarbons" into this trainwreck….

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    514
    Likes (Received)
    75

    Default

    moving with professional riggers don't seem so expensive now..........

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,561
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1790
    Likes (Received)
    1724

    Default

    Talk about a case of piling on... Sheesh, poor fellow probably feels bad enough as it is. I'm glad no one got hurt. About the only thing to do is start disassembling and check piece by piece.

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    ny usa
    Posts
    698
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    310

    Default

    Pictures will help to assess the damage. (and see how bad you fucked up)
    Anyway, shit is done, so now you have to deal with it.

    Never lift or move with steel forks on steel machine (as you have learned). Cut some wood to put on the forks. (I have oak planks cut to fit my forks, if you give a shit).

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    20,176
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ekretz View Post
    talk about a case of piling on... Sheesh, poor fellow probably feels bad enough as it is. I'm glad no one got hurt. About the only thing to do is start disassembling and check piece by piece.
    g.i.g.o...…..
    Last edited by digger doug; 01-08-2021 at 07:30 AM.

  15. Likes GregSY liked this post
  16. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    924
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1108
    Likes (Received)
    666

    Default

    TwinDad -

    I'm with eKretz - just glad nobody got hurt. If it is a Cinel 202-12 I have one as well. Weighs in at about 3,700 pounds if my memory is working this evening. Post some pictures and let's see what things look like.

    Dale

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    68
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    16

    Default

    That is why I always use a sling attached to the forks above the machine and pull up because most are top heavy. What is done is done. Thank God no one was hurt. Call your insurance company and see if the damage is covered before you take everything apart.

  18. Likes steve45 liked this post
  19. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    1,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1402
    Likes (Received)
    939

    Default

    or in some situations, a couple of decent clamps on the end of the forks to keep things from slipping off...

  20. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    5,690
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    202
    Likes (Received)
    1944

    Default

    So far I have moved my mill twice with a fork lift without any damage. Perhaps I should say a prayer of thanks.

    I hope is is still in the same place when I am moved to my final resting place. Or can I take it with me?

  21. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Manchester, England
    Posts
    9,084
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1480
    Likes (Received)
    6028

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Talk about a case of piling on... Sheesh, poor fellow probably feels bad enough as it is. I'm glad no one got hurt. About the only thing to do is start disassembling and check piece by piece.
    Another vote for this. " Let him who is without sin cast the first stone ". At one point in my career I moved machines for a living and I dropped two machines. One was a wood working planer/thicknesser and the other was a old but fancy drill grinder. I re-built them both with the help of a very good cast iron welder. The planer/thicknesser lived to fight another day but a workmate later managed to do a better job of dropping the drill grinder than I did and it went to our " elephants graveyard ".

    I came within an ace of allowing a huge slotter ( vertical shaper ) to fall over when working with an helper. I turned my back on him and the job to reset our winch and he did something really silly whilst I was concentrating on what I was doing. What I learnt then was don't turn your back on the job even with when you're working with experienced guys.

    I had another close shave when I was lying down a really big cross rail and boring head off a large vertical boring machine. I allowed the overhead crane driver to rush the job when I should have told him his fortune.

    I probably didn't sleep too well on the nights after those incidents. Dropping a machine isn't to be taken lightly, wether it's your machine or that of a customer. I expect the OP felt the same as I did and it's not a nice feeling.

    Best thing to do is take it all apart and assess the damage.

    Transporting machinery on forklifts can be hazardous especially if the cast iron machine base is sat directly onto the steel forks. Timber on the forks and lash the machine to the forklift mast is the way to go.

    Regards Tyrone.

  22. Likes Billtodd, duckfarmer27, Kjelle liked this post
  23. #16
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,638
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    824
    Likes (Received)
    1002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Talk about a case of piling on... Sheesh, poor fellow probably feels bad enough as it is. I'm glad no one got hurt. About the only thing to do is start disassembling and check piece by piece.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Another vote for this. " Let him who is without sin cast the first stone ". At one point in my career I moved machines for a living and I dropped two machines. One was a wood working planer/thicknesser and the other was a old but fancy drill grinder. I re-built them both with the help of a very good cast iron welder. The planer/thicknesser lived to fight another day but a workmate later managed to do a better job of dropping the drill grinder than I did and it went to our " elephants graveyard ".

    I came within an ace of allowing a huge slotter ( vertical shaper ) to fall over when working with an helper. I turned my back on him and the job to reset our winch and he did something really silly whilst I was concentrating on what I was doing. What I learnt then was don't turn your back on the job even with when you're working with experienced guys.

    I had another close shave when I was lying down a really big cross rail and boring head off a large vertical boring machine. I allowed the overhead crane driver to rush the job when I should have told him his fortune.

    I probably didn't sleep too well on the nights after those incidents. Dropping a machine isn't to be taken lightly, wether it's your machine or that of a customer. I expect the OP felt the same as I did and it's not a nice feeling.

    Best thing to do is take it all apart and assess the damage.

    Transporting machinery on forklifts can be hazardous especially if the cast iron machine base is sat directly onto the steel forks. Timber on the forks and lash the machine to the forklift mast is the way to go.

    Regards Tyrone.

    While I can certainly sympathize with making a mistake as I've made oodles of them in my time, what I find deserving of sarcasm is a post that basically reads, I dropped my machine, the quill only moves 2", what's wrong with it?

    No pictures, no detailed description, nothing to help anyone even begin to guess what's wrong. Maybe the purpose of the post was to vent cause clearly the OP hasn't put any effort into helping someone help him.

    Just my thoughts on the situation

  24. Likes Mtndew, digger doug, GregSY liked this post
  25. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,561
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1790
    Likes (Received)
    1724

    Default

    I get that, but once (or even twice, but 6! Times?) is enough... It's obvious that the machine is probably as hurt as his pride. And yes, some photos would be helpful.

  26. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    ny usa
    Posts
    698
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    310

    Default

    I waaaannnnnaaaaa seeeeeeeee the brokednesssssssssssssssssssssss!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  27. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  28. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    941
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    531
    Likes (Received)
    639

    Default

    Unfortunately looks like getting bashed on his first post was not the sort of advice he was looking for. I'm with Ekretz, the piling on was a little heavy handed.
    Hodge

  29. Likes James H Clark liked this post
  30. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    941
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    531
    Likes (Received)
    639

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    While I can certainly sympathize with making a mistake as I've made oodles of them in my time, what I find deserving of sarcasm is a post that basically reads, I dropped my machine, the quill only moves 2", what's wrong with it?

    No pictures, no detailed description, nothing to help anyone even begin to guess what's wrong. Maybe the purpose of the post was to vent cause clearly the OP hasn't put any effort into helping someone help him.

    Just my thoughts on the situation
    Pictures can be a little challenging for first time posters. More so if using your phone.

  31. Likes neilho liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •