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    Default greasing teflon

    i have a steel shaft in (pure) teflon bushings. is it advisable to use grease on them? the idea is mainly to keep dirt out, but i wonder how it would influence friction and if it even might be harmfull to the material. (shaft moves by about 20°.)

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    You must have a Kluber distributor in your area, why not contact that company and get a recommendation from an engineer?

    I would caution that I'd want the steel polished as best as possible in the contact area, pure Teflon isn't my choice for a wear resistant seal. As to dirt ingress, how exposed is the shaft and seal? If it's in a dirty area, some sort of secondary shield may help.

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    Grease is unlikely to damage the Teflon directly, but it would probably have higher drag from the viscous friction. If dirt is an issue, I think the grease might make it more likely to carry dirt into the gap as it gets churned by the rotation. Is rust likely on the shaft? That is one situation where using grease may be better than not. Metal shafts running in Teflon bushings or seals often show a reduction in friction and wear after an initial break-in period that allows a film of Teflon to transfer onto the metal surface.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    i have a steel shaft in (pure) teflon bushings. is it advisable to use grease on them? the idea is mainly to keep dirt out, but i wonder how it would influence friction and if it even might be harmfull to the material. (shaft moves by about 20°.)
    If the movement is rotation and only 20 degrees, can you add a bellows clamped to the bearing and the shaft for a 100% seal?
    Also, consider an Igus or similar engineered bearing.

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    Oils and grease won't affect PTFE (in this lifetime); chemical resistance (to about everything) and high-temp use are it's distinguishing properties, with low friction a "bonus". Grease will likely attract and trap more debris than the bare bearings. If some lubrication is wanted for some reason, I'd use way-oil (e.g. teflon sheet on hardinge lathes, etc).

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    Roulon is a better choice and no lubrication. Keep it dry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    i have a steel shaft in (pure) teflon bushings. is it advisable to use grease on them? the idea is mainly to keep dirt out, but i wonder how it would influence friction and if it even might be harmfull to the material. (shaft moves by about 20°.)
    Perhaps the speed/RPM would be a factor in making a decision, adding seals of some sort.

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    lots of options for seals, but it would complicate the situation considerably. so friction could increase with lube? ill keep them dry, iguess.

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    Grease is likely to attract contamination and increase wear.

    Teflon bearings, and other Teflon impregnated plastics, work by transferring material from the bearing onto the running surface of other component. You can't get material transfer if it is covered in grease, this can either defeat the purpose of the Teflon or increase the time required for break-in substantially.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Roulon is a better choice and no lubrication. Keep it dry.
    Rulon, yes I too think this would be superior.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    lots of options for seals, but it would complicate the situation considerably. so friction could increase with lube? ill keep them dry, iguess.
    The grease could be employed simply to keep the shaft from rusting.

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    From what I've heard so far, I think dry with a dust boot sounds like your best option. Dry without a dust boot is probably next best. Teflon is pretty soft so any contaminants will probably embed themselves and not cause too much harm unless it's really dirty.

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    The word from the Graduate was "Plastics"

    Today the word has been refined to be Teflon. Black graphite dust on white Teflon. If you just use some oil or grease just see how long it will stick.
    But in my experience the Teflon is slippery enough.

    Plus:
    The graphite on Teflon will make it look black. If it was a grease or oil the surrounding dust/dirt in the air can stick to it.
    For graphite dust it should not be so bad.
    Last edited by rons; 07-23-2021 at 06:19 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxcarPete View Post
    From what I've heard so far, I think dry with a dust boot sounds like your best option. Dry without a dust boot is probably next best. Teflon is pretty soft so any contaminants will probably embed themselves and not cause too much harm unless it's really dirty.
    Any dust or grit that gets impregnated into the Teflon will act as an abrasive on the shaft.

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    Just a comment

    Grease can not ATTRACT anything. Certainly not dust or grit.

    Grease on a surface can HOLD particulate contaminants that land there..

    Grammar police signing off! [-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    Any dust or grit that gets impregnated into the Teflon will act as an abrasive on the shaft.
    That's true of any bearing material, but due to the larger hardness gap between teflon and your average shaft (compared to bronze for example), the effect is reduced.

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