Hamilton Varimatic Drill Press Question
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  1. #1
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    Default Hamilton Varimatic Drill Press Question

    I’m a new owner of a Hamilton Varimatic Drill Press. The operating handle is on a ratchet device held in by a spring loaded threaded, two part assemblyas shown in the pics attached. Can another user of this press tell me what the function is of this spring/screw assembly? Is it just to adjust ratchet tension and lock it? Why is there a ratchet in the first place?
    31c38093-bc48-4c66-9c33-5097740f8e8d.jpg
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    Many drill presses have three feed handles because it is a convenient way to let the operator select the best-positioned handle for each job.

    Some drill presses and vertical mills with quills have a single handle. They usually have a means of changing the handle position to one appropriate for the job at hand. Less common, but still seen, is a single handle on a ratcheting device. I have seen antique drill presses with ratcheting down feed levers. There was a recent thread about such a ratcheting handle sold as an aftermarket attachment for Bridgeport mills. Perhaps you would like to read the comments.

    M-head quill speed handle

    Larry

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    I have one. As Larry says, the ratchet is for setting the handle position and the screw can adjust how easy it is to ratchet or to lock it.

    How's the rubber cone drive on yours? Mine's quite good for such an old machine. I put in all new bearings. Mine came with a brand new Albrecht chuck installed by the previous owner, and cost about as much as I paid for the whole machine. I only use it occasionally, but I do use it.

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    Thanks guys,
    I have other one armed drill presses and never had an issue sonInguess I was over thinking the technology on the Varimatic. Still kind of surprised folks thought it necessary to adjust the ratchet tension.
    I just got mine cleaned up. Surprisingly the cone drive is in excellent shape. Once I find the lube points and get her lubed up I check what my runout is. Unfortunately my press came with a jacobs chuck and not the Albrecht!
    I’ll have to keep my eye on the Bay for a 0-3/8 Albrecht! I need to check but I thing my spindle is threaded and not a 0 taper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathans View Post
    Thanks guys,
    I have other one armed drill presses and never had an issue sonInguess I was over thinking the technology on the Varimatic.
    The proper chuck size is 0" to 3/16" not 3/8". See also 0"- 5/32" max.

    Day Job had a whole row of the pre-vario version. We used ours as often with number 60 to 80 drills as with the smaller out of the 1 to 60 sizes.

    - A "setup man" would tool and adjust them.

    - We peons @ 88 cents an hour would spend 8 hours a day making holes in PCBs. Some were as small as a kidney bean, sliced, and similar shape. "High-tech" at the time. But 88 cent an hour min wage was a tad further back than yestidday afternoon, weren't it?



    "Occasional" user might not notice.

    8 boring hours in a row went best if the handle was in an optimal position. "Production" worker-bee had lower error-rate, broke fewer drills, had higher throughput, ergo lesser fully-burdened cost per hole and met the schedule more reliably.

    That simple.

    BTW.. much as I respect the Adolf Muehlmatt/Hamilton?

    I bought an Electro-Mechano instead.

    It has no old memories of 88 cent an hour serfdom attached to pop-up each time I lay eyeball onit!

    Last edited by thermite; 08-29-2021 at 06:23 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathans View Post
    I’ll have to keep my eye on the Bay for a 0-3/8 Albrecht! I need to check but I thing my spindle is threaded and not a 0 taper.
    3/8 seems way too large. No way would my Hamilton turn a 3/8 drill and actually cut. You’d also lose a couple inches of headroom. Mine has a 1/8” Albrecht, which seems about right. I have other machines for bigger tools.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    My bad. I meant 3/16! Tjermite, thanks for the slice of history. You must be a tad older than I. My minimum wage was $1.65!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathans View Post
    My bad. I meant 3/16! Tjermite, thanks for the slice of history. You must be a tad older than I. My minimum wage was $1.65!
    PA min-wage, actually. Federal at the time (1959-60) was already a dollar, went up to a buck twenty-five, soon after, but didn't initially have much coverage outside of Federal Contractors. I had gotten ahead of it by then on merit, but still.

    Money was just "different" in ways the online inflation calculators don't really address... back when the US dollar actually still had VALUE rather than debt, taxes, smoke, and steamed-up mirrors.

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    Yuh termite, what will history say about you?
    The poor misguided fool pretended to be a machinist and got caught!

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    Yuh termite, what will history say about you?
    The poor misguided fool pretended to be a machinist and got caught!
    Jack of all Trade, Master of None.
    Prodigious Wanker


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