Hamilton Varimatic problem
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  1. #1
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    Default Hamilton Varimatic problem

    Hello, I just pick up a Hamilton Varimatic sensitive drill press and while I'm tearing it apart in attempt to clean it, I'm struggling on removing the shaft in the image. The lever is not smooth and free flowing and I'm certain it's due to the gummed up grease that has collected dirt and shavings over the years.

    I've lost two night on trying to figure it out, but I'm now needing to enlist some help.

    lever_shaft.jpg

  2. #2
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    Taper pin? Did you measure both ends? That's what I do when I don't know which end to hit with the punch.

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    BTW, I've always wanted one of those, because the variable speed mechanism is much sexier than a VFD to me.

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    My Hamilton has no pin. Then again, mine has a piece of acme threaded rod instead of a rack, so rotational position doesn't matter. The threaded rod has pin spanner holes in the bottom end so the top hex nut can be tightened without the threaded rod spinning. I think the acme rod is OEM.

    On my Varimatic, the rubber in the variable speed cone has gone hard, so the drive slips. I read somewhere on PM that there is an outfit in the Carolinas, I think, that still sells the parts.

    The variable speed mechanism uses angular contact bearings to absorb the thrust. On mine, those bearings are very noisy. As I recall, there was no way to get them out without damaging them, plus they are very expensive angular contact bearings. So mine stays noisy.

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    I'd price those bearings, for some folks $2K isn't much to restore a lathe, for instance, and to others $10 is robbery, so for that reason you might do well finding out for yourself.
    I've found them (Hamilton's) in CL, and for around $200, plus shipping probably less than $100. But I don't need one enough to justify spending the money.

    You guys are fortunate. VFD's are like fake plastic hubcaps compared to mechanical variable speed mechanisms. Totally boring. (from a guy who ripped a varidrive out and replaced it with a VFD, but it's too easy and not elegant)

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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    Taper pin? Did you measure both ends? That's what I do when I don't know which end to hit with the punch.
    Here is an image of each side of the upper unit where that shaft enters. I'm not certain if these are what's keeping me from removing the shaft or not. But since both pins have little mushroom heads, I'm afraid punching them would do no good.pins.jpg

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    There is a parts drawing here, and it shows no pin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by indychuck View Post
    Here is an image of each side of the upper unit where that shaft enters. I'm not certain if these are what's keeping me from removing the shaft or not. But since both pins have little mushroom heads, I'm afraid punching them would do no good.pins.jpg
    Wire wheel the paint and grime off, looks like a Dowel Pin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by redlee View Post
    Wire wheel the paint and grime off, looks like a Dowel Pin.
    Here are some images with the paint scraped with a wire wheel and other images that may help determine how to get the shaft out.


    s6.jpgs1.jpgs2.jpgs3.jpgs4.jpg

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    another image

    s5.jpg

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    Why not just free up the spindle bearing and extract the rack and cross-piece upward as one unit for cleaning? Maybe you have to pull the pinion first.

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    I just looked at mine- it does not have a pin.
    Looked at google image search and second image shows one with a pin.

    http://vintagemachinery.org/photoind...es/17464-B.jpg

    I also ran cross this site, but have not persued all its several links.

    One that I did has a great deal of information in its 104 pages. You might try contacting the author.
    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/2853/6560.pdf

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    I also see no reason to remove that pin, it may be one of those straight knurled pins. Perhaps you can find out what the bearing numbers are and find out what the cost is.

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    If the pin is holding the part in that needs to come out then it must come out, use a little heat and punch or drill and tap and use a slide hammer or drill it out.
    Try punching it, use something heavy on the other side with a hole absorb the shock. It looks like a straight pin to me.

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    I just spent most of two days driving rivets out of smoke jumper polaski's for a customer. I found early on that the internal pressure would cause the rivet walls to collapse on the drill bit and stop it from turning, or, if really tightened in the superchuck, break and spit painful shrapnel at high velocities.

    I finally found the best procedure, drill almost all the way through with a drill about 1/2 the diameter of the rivet, in stages to evacuate all the chips, and using MolyDee. Then over to a solid vise and with a punch slightly smaller than the hole drive them out. The heads were drilled off first with a larger drill.

    The rivet areas were drenched in Kroil two days earlier to boot. It was a dirty nasty job, I took it on because I didn't want to ask anyone else to do it.

    That's an extreme example, but drill almost all the way through with a drill sized a few thousandths over 1/8", Kroil too of course, and drive it out as someone holds a mass against the opposite side, or set it on a steel bench top.
    But I'd try a hammer and punch first with Kroil, again, to be effective it has to have mass behind it or you will just jar the poor thing.


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