Has anyone pulled the headstock off a Colchester round head?
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    Default Has anyone pulled the headstock off a Colchester round head?

    I'm in the middle of restoring a 1968 Clausing Colchester Master Mk1.5, the lathe is pretty much stripped to the castings but I have yet to unbolt the headstock from the bed out of the fear of alignment issues. I'm curious if it's worth the hassle to remove, and the consequences/difficulty of getting it back in alignment once it's reinstalled. I'd appreciate any insight.

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    Yes. A mid 1950 era Colchester Dominion. That's the Canadian version of the round head Triumph. Don't recall why I did, but was no issue to re-align. Not sure if same design as the smaller Master, but probably similar.

    Why do you need to remove the headstock?

    L7

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    Quote Originally Posted by lucky7 View Post
    Yes. A mid 1950 era Colchester Dominion. That's the Canadian version of the round head Triumph. Don't recall why I did, but was no issue to re-align. Not sure if same design as the smaller Master, but probably similar.

    Why do you need to remove the headstock?

    L7
    Easier to clean and paint the bed. Also makes it feasible to lift the bed off the cabinet without a hoist. I don't need to do it, but it would make things easier.

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    I did a 1968 Colchester some years ago. I found no need to pull the headstock, and felt it was more sensible to leave it 'as is'. I didn't want to risk all the things you mention for no reason. I was able to clean it up just fine and ran it for 15 years before I gave it to a friend who is still using it. Pic from 2004....


    disassembled.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I did a 1968 Colchester some years ago. I found no need to pull the headstock, and felt it was more sensible to leave it 'as is'. I didn't want to risk all the things you mention for no reason. I was able to clean it up just fine and ran it for 15 years before I gave it to a friend who is still using it. Pic from 2004....


    disassembled.jpg
    Well, that's exactly what my lathe looks like right now, haha.

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    It was a lot of years ago (1995) that i stripped and rebuilt my old Chipmaster for a bed regrind but remember no dramas so it must have been cake.
    By memory there's 4x bolts to hold the headstock on (1x each corner) and a 1/2" dowel at the chuck face end for the head to swivel around, when clocking it back in.

    What i do remember is though...rebuilding the tailstock...
    I had split it, and the base part i'd machined and sunk in some 1/8" ground flat gauge plate to raise the centre line back up (as it was worn and low).
    I assembled it all back together and clocked it using a mag base on the spindle and the dti in the taper.
    It read 0>10 thou high, so i split it and then surface ground 9.5 thou off the gauge plate.
    Reassembled and it was low...
    Stripped it and sunk in a new piece of ground flat gauge plate, re-checked everything, and this time ground HALF the amount what the clock said
    Perfecto!

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    The roundhead Master and Student have 6 bolts from under the bed.....take off the clutch/switch bits,if they are still there, remove the quadrant ,undo the 6 socket head screws ,and lift off the head.No tricks,nothing hidden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    The roundhead Master and Student have 6 bolts from under the bed.....take off the clutch/switch bits,if they are still there, remove the quadrant ,undo the 6 socket head screws ,and lift off the head.No tricks,nothing hidden.
    Now when I reinstall it, how exactly do I get it on there straight, or do I just need to spend a few hours with a dial indicator and an allen wrench?

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    Yep ,thats it.....at least they are easier than the Bantams,because you leave the motor operational for test cuts.......before doing that ,I would check the spindle bearing adjustment.....not saying do anything to it,but check for play....The rear bearing is originally self adjusting via springs,so only the front pair.


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