Help/advice needed for lifting MSZ EE-630-01 Lathe
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Help/advice needed for lifting MSZ EE-630-01 Lathe

    Good evening PM,

    I work for a tree service and we generally use our crane for tree work, or setting trusses for some of the local construction companies. We have moved some machines in the past, but that was just to bin them for scrap (I shed a tear for a few, I can't deny), however tomorrow I need to lift a MSZ EE-630-01 onto a trailer, and then off again at the destination. I don't want to write off the lathe by damaging the ways, lead screw, or anything else on the machine.

    I've watched Adam's video on lifting, and have looked at the images provided on a few of the threads here in the past. If I can't find any specific information regarding the lathe I need to lift then I will do my best to follow their lead, by blocking it to keep the slings off of the precision parts and have all of the load placed under the bed.

    Is there any reason why the lathe I am lifting should be treated differently, or perhaps do the MSZ lathes have dedicated lifting points?

    If all goes according to plan, we will be lifting the lathe straight up, backing a flat bed under it, and then placing it back down.

    Thank you for your time,

    Shaun

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,624
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    440
    Likes (Received)
    3533

    Default

    The model of the lathe means nothing to me. Pics would be much more helpful, as they would show the length and the relative size of the headstock compared to the rest of the lathe.

    For a short bed lathe, a pick point in front of the headstock is usually the balance. If the headstock is heavy, a bar through the spindle and a sling with a chainfall to the hook is used to level the lathe. Depending on the configuration of the leadscrew and other shafts, you can either block out the sling, use a sling around the webbing, or drop the sling through and use a bar on the bottom of the bed.

    Long bed lathes will use the same pick point in front of the headstock, and a second about or past the center leg. Use a chainfall on the second pick point to allow you to adjust for level.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •