Help me set this up. Sharpening carbide bits. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpster_diving View Post
    Curious. Why no to the green silicon carbide wheel? Because of the availability of diamond wheels?
    Green wheels are a cheap holdover from the 1960s when the diamond cartel and the synthetic diamond makers had a HAPPY STANDOFF AND BOTH WERE GETTING RICH. tHIS lasted until the Chinese got in the game.The last green wheel that I saw in St louis tool shops was in the 80s. Edwin Dirnbeck

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwin dirnbeck View Post
    Believe it or not,he COULD BE ON TO SOMETHING.fIRST, arange the grinder so that the swarrf is thrown AWAY FROM OPERATER. SECOND,the center of the grinding wheel should be on the center of the drill press spindle,BUT,BUT ofset toward the perifery of the carbide in such a manner that the wheel is forcing the perifery of the carbide toward the center of the carbide rotation.THIS WIL MINIMIZE PERIFERY CHIPPING.If the diamond wheel is course and only around 1/8 or less wide ,and the carbide is rotatine you WILL have a vbery efisient and free cutting situation. There will be very little recuting of chips. Yes,grinding makes chips,they are just smaller.Raising and lowering the quill whilst grinding might also help material removal.The picture is not very clear and most dont know what the bit looks like AND THE DRILL PRESS looks cheezy,so most think this is not worht considering.One reply mentioned grinding carbide with a green wheel,I dont know if this was ment to be a joke,but IN 2019 NOBODY SHOULD EVER BE USEING A GREEN SILICON CARBIDE WHEEL. Rather than attack this guy ,take a close look at what he is trying to do. Edwin Dirnbeck
    Thank you for the constructive reply. Green teeth is also a specific brand name for the actual stump cutting teeth. The wheel Iím using is supposed to be a diamond wheel, I believe itís actually considered 80 grit. Sharpening like this isnít my original idea. No less than 50 YouTube videos on doing so, and wheels made specifically for this easily found on Amazon.

    Each tooth has a cost of $10-15. They may last an hour, they may last a couple weeks. Depends on how many rocks I hit while grinding. 30 cutters on my wheel xís. The cost to replace a full set is around $400. Yes, I can have them rebrazed, but that isnít any cheaper than buying new. So finding a decent way to sharpen myself on rainy days is necessary, as I have hundreds of used sitting in buckets.

    Btw, I am aware of the heath hazards associated. My drill press sits on wheels, and I roll it outside. Plus a fan blowing. Iíd still Like some advice on drill press speeds. One gentleman mentioned 100 RPM. Thatís a little slower than Iíve been going, but Iíll give it a shot.

  4. #23
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    I know my photo sucks, I’m new here and haven’t figured out a better way yet...
    So, here is a YouTube video that shows the process. Hopefully this is allowed?

    YouTube

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  6. #24
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    The diamond wheel running straight to the sides and true to the OD is critical for diamond wheel life. You may have to true up the wheel mount flange face and locate for least OD run out to be very good.. any bounce or wobble will eat up your diamond wheel.that reason for slow part(teeth)rotation is again trying to reduce chatter/wobble/vibration ..all diamond wheel killers.
    A wet diamond wheel last a long time. Dry the part and wheel get hot/ pull out diamonds before they are dull / bounce around adding stress.
    I have a ball way long travel Cincinnati TC grinder that has a weight pull feed device so I could make a similar set-up with high precision grinding and so likely more cost efficient ..Might give that a shot next summer. I could set it for perhaps .020 take off per run and sharpen with perhaps a 120 7"or 8" surface grinder wheel.
    A piece of corrugated pipe around such a set-up catches most coolant to go back into your bucket.Washing soda and water makes a good coolant that is safe enough to dump.
    Agree I don't think a green wheels would be good for the job.

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  8. #25
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    Kanman,
    One should at least say welcome to the PM board.
    It's sometimes up front brutal, do not take it personalty.
    Bob
    PS. that video is not only allowed but surley validates what you are thinking.

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  10. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMasochism View Post
    Dude, you gotta lay off the meth.
    No meth for me,I am high on life.
    The guy probably should have posted this on the other forum. There are many tens of thousands of stump grinders out there.Each has 10 or more bits.They don't need to be super sharp or pretty .They get rounded off on the ends . If a fast cheap regrinder was available,the professionals could touch them up every week or so just like the lawn guys,who sharpen blades before they are trashed.There are many special purpose sharpening machine for maintaining equipment. These machines don't need to be built like a heavy machine tool.Edwin Dirnbeck

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  12. #27
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    Yeah, after "getting it", and seeing the video..... That red roo sharpener is an angle grinder attached into a sheet metal box. After the 2 kilo weight, and the adder weight, OK, OK, this is some rough sharpening, and after all the "tooth" is gonna go grubbing in the dirt.

    Seems like it will work. Only isue is whether that grinder motor you have is gonna have the oomph to do the grinding. The angle grinder sure bogged down a bit. Might take longer, but if it is a day you can't work, I guess that's not an issue.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Here is a small grinder (thank carbide bob for the suggestion) that would be much better that that bench grinder clamped to the drill press table.

    30" Blanchard Rotary Surface Grinder, 30 " Electro Magnetic Chuck | eBay
    Thanks for that ebay link Rob. I have a very similar grinder and always wondered how the flat belt was supposed to be configured.

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    likely it would be hard to make profit running such a big machine as that Blanchard for sharpening small work.
    3/4 hp is good/OK for running a diamond wheel up to 8" diameter IMHO.

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    After watching the video I'm going to have to retract my previous statements. The "teeth" are round, not square like the ones I had to work with, and I better understand what you're trying to do. I have to agree that re-sharp beats a day without work or spending $400 for new. Others have given good advice per set-up, direction, and speeds. After watching the video and reading posts from the OP I just wanted to acknowledge that my previous statements should be ignored. Hope this works well for you, good luck.

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  17. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Thanks for that ebay link Rob. I have a very similar grinder and always wondered how the flat belt was supposed to be configured.
    I saw that looking at that sellers other items a few weeks ago. Holy moly, without knowing the belt layout you would go crazy trying to figure that one out! I'm glad it helps.

  18. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpster_diving View Post
    Curious. Why no to the green silicon carbide wheel? Because of the availability of diamond wheels?
    Because they aren't a whole hell of a lot harder than the carbide. Think trying to grind concrete with another rock. You might be able to get there eventually but the result won't be pretty and it will take a dog's age. Diamond cuts through carbide like butter in comparison.

    The last memories I have of using green SiC wheels on carbide were that the wheels needed to be kept freshly dressed to do much of ANY cutting and that grinding carbide pretty much resulted in the wheels slowly destroying themselves in a cloud of dust floating in the air as all the dull abrasive grains were sacrificed.

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  20. #33
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    I used to performance test diamond wheel for a number of manufacturer and also used green wheels for spin grinding and back off of solid carbide mill cutters. I wish I had kept all the test data but all tossed.
    Seemed green wheels took about as much wheel as carbide removed so nowadays with manufactured diamonds at such low prices there would not be much if any savings in using green wheels. The natural/real diamond wheels were a lot better than manufactured but not really worth the price. They cut better/less drag on Hp and gave a better surface finish IMHO.
    I think the Op's grinder is Ok with true set-up of the wheel at start and running wet.

    I would dress the wheel mount hub and knock the wheel <.002 at start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Thanks for that ebay link Rob. I have a very similar grinder and always wondered how the flat belt was supposed to be configured.
    Yes . . . something of redeeming value with the added bonus of humor


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