HELP NEEDED! Unknown Lathe Type
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  1. #1
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    Default HELP NEEDED! Unknown Lathe Type

    d5f7fe87-ac63-44fd-abfe-a9c415d7f584.jpgI have this lathe in the shop I work at and none of us know what kind it is or how it works to itís full abilities. I have picture I can send via txt. If you could private message me your number and Iíll send them over. It would be much appreciated! The main problem is that I cannot get my saddle to move.

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    Are the half-nuts engaged by accident?

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    See I don’t even know what those are. It’s mainly just me working on it and I know very little

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    The lever that engages the carriage for threading. It's the handle on the far right of the apron.

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    A picture of the headstock would help id the maker.
    Bill D

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    It’s an American tool works lathe

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    You could also check to see if the carriage feed lever is engaged.
    Some lathes also have a clamp or lock to clamp the carriage to the ways. You could look into this also.

    These are the simplest things I can think of off hand without standing in front of it.
    Google a lathe lever diagram and it should point you in the general diretion of where to look for these things.
    All lathes are pretty much laid out the same.

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    Thumbnail is immediate fore runner of the earliest ATW - note NEITHER of the two shafts across face of bed are screws

    If yours is similar, lets focus on apron controls - the apron hangs down from the saddle

    Central knob engages feed - right tight engaged, left loose not engaged

    Extreme right hand lever may select between long feeds and cross feeds

    Lever up by cross slide engages half nuts on lead screw - which is out of sight between ways

    Look down in there - if you don't see a big screw where the chips also fall, we are barking up the wrong tree

    Good generic old lathe info here if needed:

    http://campkahler.com/files/How_to_R...he_SB_1of2.pdf

    http://campkahler.com/files/How_to_R...he_SB_2of2.pdf
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails d-e.jpg  

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    If you see a square headed bolt on top of the carriage, check to make sure it is loose. They often would put a lock bolt on the carriages. It could also be the levers that engage the feeds that are not allowing it to move. Once you figure it out, I would strongly recommend you find someone nearby to help you get started. Do some research on SAFE operation of a lathe and don't operate it while trapped in a corner with it. Don't let the size fool you, they can be dangerous to operate. Especially if you have little experience.

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    I would call it an engine lathe. Looks like it was designed to be driven by a flat belt. Possibly from an overhead line shaft in a factory. In the days before small electric motors were common. I would guess 1920 or earlier.
    Bill D


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