HELP! thread gage removal
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN, USA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Question HELP! thread gage removal

    I've been given the task of calibrating some of the Thread Gages at the shop where I work. I'm having trouble trying to remove the GO thread from a double-sided thread gage (pic1).
    Normally on this type of handle, the tapered end of a special drift-punch (pic2) is used to remove the GO thread, then the reverse side of the punch us used for removal of th NO-GO thread.
    My problem is that the back end of the GO thread doesn't extend into the handle far enough for the drift punch to hit it (pic3). Any suggestions?




    Thanks in advance,
    TheInspector

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,698
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14229
    Likes (Received)
    14249

    Default

    Drop a small ball bearing in through the side hole to take up the distance,* insert drift and hit

    *A little grease will hold it in place.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tyler, Texas USA
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    +1 on the BB. Used that trick a number of times. It will sit in the grinding center on the gage member ok with a spot of grease.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    657
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    498
    Likes (Received)
    446

    Default

    Same thing I'd suggest x2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,671
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    40
    Likes (Received)
    4223

    Default

    The handle is aluminum. Dip it in 300 degree F hot oil. Expansion of alum Vs Steel will release the plug.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tyler, Texas USA
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Before I learned of the BB trick, I just set them under an incandescent light for a while.

    Forrest's hot oil reminded me. Hot oil would certainly be quicker.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN, USA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wells View Post
    +1 on the BB. Used that trick a number of times. It will sit in the grinding center on the gage member ok with a spot of grease.
    suggestions on type of grease? we have about 50 different types here. (or does it even matter, as long as it's semi-sticky?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tyler, Texas USA
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    The grease is entirely uncritical except for it's sticktion.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    10,215
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    58
    Likes (Received)
    5696

    Default

    A brief visit with a torch, I use that to remove collets from my little mill, works every time...I keep a Benzomatic handy for that purpose.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN, USA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default sticktion

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wells View Post
    The grease is entirely uncritical except for it's sticktion.
    Sticktion is a word now. we should all add it to Wikipedia as follows:
    sticktion (adj); the ability of a given product to make something stick.
    see also: coefficient of friction

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tyler, Texas USA
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Opposite of lubricity, maybe? Or would it be Teflonicity?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Newcastle, Australia
    Posts
    595
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    136

    Default

    Note that "stiction" (sic) is already in use;

    Stiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN, USA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Lightbulb Solution

    so, i was unable to find a ball-bearing of the proper size that I could pound on, but I cut the short end of an allen wrench down and used it in a similar way. no time for pics, sorry.
    thanks for the suggestions, guys.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN, USA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Thumbs up insufficient

    Quote Originally Posted by plannerpower View Post
    Note that "stiction" (sic) is already in use;

    Stiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    sweet coincidence, but the existing definition is insufficient.
    we all need to add an additional one.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tyler, Texas USA
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Slightly different word. Static + friction is stiction. It's more fun to make a new one for grease. Anyway.....don't get too serious here.

    Inspector...you got the late shift, eh? Glad you found something that worked.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •