Herbert No.4 Senior non-preoptive / general capstan lathe advice - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Tested the stops today, most are working well enough - except the carriage stop which I don't want to force.

    I'll have a look on the apron for a drain plug tomorrow.


    To Edwin, the capstan is sufficiently useful.. luckily we also rarely make more than 50-100 parts in a run, so it's still the most fun machine. The cnc's have their uses but 20 minutes setting the capstan up, a lot of that spent digging through disused tooling, then getting going for an afternoon, maybe a bit of the next morning, to produce plenty of bits we need.. OTOH, we've live tooling on one of the cnc's and it also gets used for some slotting - all the machines have strengths..
    The Herbert has inspired me to finally get round to making a spacer to fit a Hardinge BB57 turret on my own BB59.

  2. #22
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    The IME carriage apron was usually the one full of shit and not working etc etc - as it's closest (like often underneath) to the workpiece and so coolant flow.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    The IME carriage apron was usually the one full of shit and not working etc etc - as it's closest (like often underneath) to the workpiece and so coolant flow.
    ...and yet another reason to ditch water based coolant and run oil...

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  6. #24
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    I'll see if the lathe will be used more in future.. if so then I'll see whether there's time to disassemble the apron.. we can do most things if only requiring time rather than money.

    Oil instead of water-based coolant is a great idea but I'd rather not for now. It's mostly collet work but oil-based is another level of mess on an unenclosed machine.

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    The IME carriage apron was usually the one full of shit and not working etc etc - as it's closest (like often underneath) to the workpiece and so coolant flow.
    Yes you're right. The coolant will get in along the keyway in the feed shaft that runs through the apron. Even with a specially shaped seal like " Herbert's " provided it'll get in eventually. Draining the sump on a regular basis ( say every 6 months ) is the only way to deal with it.
    On one of the machines I used to repair pretty often the operator insisted on using flood coolant all the time. It kept me in work.

    Regards Tyrone.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Grainger View Post
    I'll see if the lathe will be used more in future.. if so then I'll see whether there's time to disassemble the apron.. we can do most things if only requiring time rather than money.

    Oil instead of water-based coolant is a great idea but I'd rather not for now. It's mostly collet work but oil-based is another level of mess on an unenclosed machine.
    Why would slinging nasty "petri dish" coolant be any less than slinging oil ?

    As discussed last week, movable (use magnets) shields to keep the splash contained to the trough.

  9. #27
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    I'm not opposed to running oil coolant but it can't really be done at work right now.. my own coolant-equipped machines will eventually have oil..
    I'm not really one of the decisionmakers at work, but it may be able to be done in future - once the machine has been seen back running a bit longer.

    We don't yet have anything at work to drain the oil from swarf, so it starts to become a bit more involved and that's a cost we wont have if running water-based coolant. I can offer to make a spinner (or modify an old washing machine) as a homework job but it'll still take some time and chats to warm people to the idea.

    For cheapness, would ISO 46 or 64 hydraulic oil be alright for combined way and coolant oil? - thinking on the Herbert, along with a Hardinge HLV and Deckel FP1. Specific oils are one thing to review but I'm not sure which would be the best viscosity.

  10. #28
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    It looks like I'll probably go with ISO68 for my own machines and possibly eventually the Herbert - though the Deckel will still need a heavier way oil.

    I don't know when or that it will certainly be possible to talk work into using oil coolant on the Herbert - will see in time.

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    I was on a comittee once,reviewing a report"Testicular cancer in lathe operators caused by neat oil coolant fling off".....I recall the staff doctor would nod off and snore loudly at regular intervals......He was a horse vet in WW1,who had qualified after the war as human doctor .Cappy ,they called him.Nice old guy ,but your arm had to be hanging off before he d give you a sickie.

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  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I was on a comittee once,reviewing a report"Testicular cancer in lathe operators caused by neat oil coolant fling off".....I recall the staff doctor would nod off and snore loudly at regular intervals......He was a horse vet in WW1,who had qualified after the war as human doctor .Cappy ,they called him.Nice old guy ,but your arm had to be hanging off before he d give you a sickie.
    As an apprentice I remember seeing signs in the shop warning you of the dangers of getting testicular cancer from getting oil on your overalls. I believe " ring spinners " in the textile industry were particularly prone to catching it.

    Regards Tyrone.

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  15. #31
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    MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM?

    What a choice - rusty lathe or rusty bollox.

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  17. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM?

    What a choice - rusty lathe or rusty bollox.
    If you look up " mule spinners cancer " you'll see what I was referring to. It was very prevalent in this part of Lancashire with it being a centre for cotton spinning.

    Regards Tyrone.

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  19. #33
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    Friend had a car up on the lift, was bleeding the brakes, the fluid shot out (like it does when loosening the bleeder)
    and nailed him in the crotch.....

    Didn't think much of it until a few hours later.....he said he was gonna hurl. It was
    too late to wash it off (but he did try a few times)

    And then in a few days, he said the skin peeled off like from a bad sunburn....


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